Ask a Question forum: Freesia disease identification (pic)?

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Name: Jai or Jack
WV (Zone 6b)
Om shanti om.
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Jai_Ganesha
Feb 13, 2017 12:25 AM CST
Here are some leaves I cut off of several freesia plants I have been growing for months.

I'm about 90% sure of the culprit(s) but I want to ask other people to chime in because I am not an expert in freesia by any means.

Thumb of 2017-02-13/Jai_Ganesha/c27977

I have been treating with a fungicide, virucide, and insecticide for two weeks and I have noticed an improvement. But I decided to use all three because I was not completely certain of the cause(s).

I appreciate any and all feedback.
Keep going!
Name: Elaine
Sarasota, Fl
The one constant in life is change
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dyzzypyxxy
Feb 13, 2017 10:17 AM CST
Jai, it's really better to treat your plants with the right method, once you ID the cause of the problem first. Just "nuking" everything can do more harm than good, and even if you do stop the problem you won't know which treatment was the one that worked. Try one at a time in future, a week or so apart.

For indoor plants, the most common culprit is insects, specifically spider mites. You can test to see if you have them by just running a leaf between your thumb and finger gently. If you see a reddish/orange or rusty stain on your fingers, spider mites are at work. A spray of mild soapy water solution at 1/2tsp. dish soap per quart works great. You need to repeat the treatment every 4 or 5 days for a couple of weeks to get any succeeding generations that may hatch as the soapy water will not kill a bug still in the egg.

What I'm seeing also is some burnt tips on the leaves, which might have been caused by too much fertilizer - did you fertilize a week or two before the symptoms showed up? Have these Freesias bloomed yet? Once they bloom, the foliage will mature, grow a new bulb then start to die back naturally so you can expect these to pretty much disappear over the summer anyway. You can put the pot outside in a dry, shady spot and bring it in to force new blooms next winter.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Name: Jai or Jack
WV (Zone 6b)
Om shanti om.
Container Gardener Region: West Virginia Multi-Region Gardener Garden Photography Amaryllis Zinnias
Gardens in Buckets Annuals Houseplants Plant and/or Seed Trader Birds Garden Ideas: Level 1
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Jai_Ganesha
Feb 13, 2017 10:40 AM CST
The virucide, fungicide, and insecticide are actually the same treatment. I went with something that covers a broad range of elements instead of more limited ones on purpose. Sorry, that wasn't clear.

I don't mind using any products that are harsher than they need to be so long as they work. Nope, I had not fertilized until planting and then again maybe two-ish months before these symptoms started.
Keep going!
Name: Elaine
Sarasota, Fl
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Herbs Orchids Birds Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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dyzzypyxxy
Feb 13, 2017 10:57 AM CST
Don't mean to be pedantic here, but the 3-in-1 treatment still doesn't let you actually discover what was wrong. I sure hope you wore protective clothing including gloves and a hat and glasses when you used it, too. Ick. Not for indoor use, I don't think.

If you try one treatment for one thing eg. treat for insects first with the soapy water - then if it works you know what to watch for in future and you can prevent it or treat it sooner. It's also way WAY cheaper than spending $14 at the garden store on the chemical nuke. If it doesn't work, you move on to the next possibility. Baking soda in water is a good preventative for fungus on indoor plants. Nothing you use will reverse leaf damage so preventing new infestation or infection is what you need to work at.

Also, the insecticide in the shotgun formula is most likely a systemic - something that's taken up by the plant and then poisons the bugs when they feed on it. Many bugs are already resistant to a lot of systemics for the same reason our human diseases have become resistant to antibiotics. If you treat with the stuff repeatedly, and a few bugs survive the first treatment, they are then resistant and when they breed all the new bugs are resistant too. So your expensive chemical then becomes ineffective. Go the simple route first - always! It's just as effective, not as toxic to you or your environment, less expensive and the bugs don't develop resistance

Have your freesias bloomed yet? Only asking because you can expect the foliage to die back a month or two after flowering and there's nothing you can do about that.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Name: Jai or Jack
WV (Zone 6b)
Om shanti om.
Container Gardener Region: West Virginia Multi-Region Gardener Garden Photography Amaryllis Zinnias
Gardens in Buckets Annuals Houseplants Plant and/or Seed Trader Birds Garden Ideas: Level 1
Image
Jai_Ganesha
Feb 15, 2017 12:00 AM CST
No, they haven't bloomed yet. I will try to take a picture of the plants when I get home. They're much healthier-looking now than these scraps suggest.
Keep going!

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