Bulbs forum: Cardiocrinum giganteum...WOW!!!

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Name: UrbanWild
Kentucky (Zone 6b)
Kentucky - borderline of 6a & 6b
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UrbanWild
Feb 18, 2017 1:35 PM CST
Has anyone grown Cardiocrinum giganteum? What a stunner!
Always looking for interesting plants for pollinators and food! Bonus points for highly, and pleasantly scented plants.

"Si hortum in bibliotheca habes, nihil deerit." [“If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.”] -- Marcus Tullius Cicero in Ad Familiares IX, 4, to Varro. 46 BCE
Oxford UK (Zone 8a)
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longk
Mar 1, 2017 12:31 PM CST
I grew this way back in 2006. It bloomed and that was it! My mistake I think was to buy a flowering sized bulb as they are monocarpic (depending upon your source) and so my bulb had no chance to produce offsets (I suspect that the seller had removed all offsets prior to dispatch). Read the PBS page on Cardiocrinum and they say that they're not monocarpic but that the basal plate survives but there was no sign of that happening on mine. Maybe it was poor care on my part but if I try again I'll buy a bulb that is a year or two away from flowering.

@magnolialover or @pardalinum may have thoughts on the above as I'm not even approaching being an expert.

Well worth the effort of growing it in my opinion though. Mine stood near ten foot tall.
Salvia and anything unusual
Name: Connie
Willamette Valley OR (Zone 8a)
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pardalinum
Mar 1, 2017 1:17 PM CST
I have never grown it though the temptation has been great... I agree that purchasing a bulb a couple of seasons from flowering would be better. Plenty of time to settle in and propagate prior to blooming.

Ed McRae in his book "Lilies" states: "After flowering the main bulb dies, but under good conditions it will have produced a number of offsets that will flower in a few more years". It likes light shade, summer moisture and rich humus soil.
Name: UrbanWild
Kentucky (Zone 6b)
Kentucky - borderline of 6a & 6b
Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Native Plants and Wildflowers Miniature Gardening Organic Gardener Frogs and Toads Dog Lover
Birds Vegetable Grower Spiders! Hummingbirder Butterflies Critters Allowed
Image
UrbanWild
Mar 2, 2017 9:38 PM CST
I read somewhere that it produces seeds fairly well.
Always looking for interesting plants for pollinators and food! Bonus points for highly, and pleasantly scented plants.

"Si hortum in bibliotheca habes, nihil deerit." [“If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.”] -- Marcus Tullius Cicero in Ad Familiares IX, 4, to Varro. 46 BCE

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