Roses forum: Blackspot resistant rose

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Name: Ann
Central Texas (Zone 8b)
Halcyon
Feb 19, 2017 11:54 AM CST
Hello , I'm a new member zone 8b and would like to share with the you the most black spot resistant rose I've ever owned. I feel obligated to share this one since so many people have given up on roses due to black spot. Apricot Candy is her name and I've owned this one for over 12 years. About five years ago a terrible case of black spot took over all my roses and by the end of the summer I didn't have a rose that had a green leaf on it ! I'm still fighting the disease on a few of my roses (Pinata) to this day. Any hoot, Apricot Candy shrugged off the disease with just a few lower leaves showing signs of black spot. I didn't really think much of it (traumatized, hysteria and lack of sleep) at the time, since I was in total defense mode --raking, defoliating, and spraying like a mad woman. A few years went by and I happened to go to the local nursery in late August and I went straight to the roses looking for clearance deals. All the roses had varying degrees of black spot from everyday, overhead watering and lack of air circulation. When there in the back row I spotted 3 beautiful Apricot Candy roses with their shiny, leathery , green leaves intact. The clouds parted, the birds sang, and a radiant sunray shown down from the sky and I knew-- it was a sign to buy 3 more!

AC is a grandiflora yet, I've been seeing her sold as a HT online and In one of the nurseries here (not the one I bought it from). I'm sure it is the same rose--it looks the same in the pics ? For me it grows 5' x 4' and it is heat resistant as well.















Name: Carol Sandt
Lancaster County, Pennsylvania (Zone 6b)
Peonies Butterflies Region: Mid-Atlantic Hibiscus Daylilies Xeriscape
Hostas Roses Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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csandt
Feb 19, 2017 4:05 PM CST
Halcyon said:Hello , I'm a new member zone 8b and would like to share with the you the most black spot resistant rose I've ever owned. I feel obligated to share this one since so many people have given up on roses due to black spot. Apricot Candy is her name and I've owned this one for over 12 years. About five years ago a terrible case of black spot took over all my roses and by the end of the summer I didn't have a rose that had a green leaf on it ! I'm still fighting the disease on a few of my roses (Pinata) to this day. Any hoot, Apricot Candy shrugged off the disease with just a few lower leaves showing signs of black spot. I didn't really think much of it (traumatized, hysteria and lack of sleep) at the time, since I was in total defense mode --raking, defoliating, and spraying like a mad woman. A few years went by and I happened to go to the local nursery in late August and I went straight to the roses looking for clearance deals. All the roses had varying degrees of black spot from everyday, overhead watering and lack of air circulation. When there in the back row I spotted 3 beautiful Apricot Candy roses with their shiny, leathery , green leaves intact. The clouds parted, the birds sang, and a radiant sunray shown down from the sky and I knew-- it was a sign to buy 3 more!

AC is a grandiflora yet, I've been seeing her sold as a HT online and In one of the nurseries here (not the one I bought it from). I'm sure it is the same rose--it looks the same in the pics ? For me it grows 5' x 4' and it is heat resistant as well.

@Halcyon, Apricot Candy sounds fabulous! How would you describe its fragrance? (Fruity? Lemon? Citrus? Licorice? Etc.) The NGA info just says "Moderate."















Carol Sandt
"Hope is the simple trust that God has not forgotten the recipe for manna.” - W. Paul Jones in "Trumpet at Full Moon"
Name: Ann
Central Texas (Zone 8b)
Halcyon
Feb 20, 2017 9:05 PM CST
Hi Csant,. I'd say she is a moderate tending to towards a little apple. When she blooms this spring I'll send some pics. I wish the breeder would cross this rose and pass on those good traits. Have a good day.
Name: Steve
Prescott, AZ (Zone 7b)
Region: Southwest Gardening Roses Irises Lilies
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Steve812
Mar 5, 2017 11:48 AM CST
I've battled blackspot for decades in Texas, New Jersey, and Arizona. IMO things were worst in NJ. I found very few HT roses did well. Midas Touch, Electron, Big Purple, and Olympiad, I think, were the only HT roses in my garden at the end of a decade of rose gardening; the rest (probably upwards of two dozen cultivars) died of black spot. Some, like Don Juan, bloomed once or twice before dying. Most did not. Gardening in AZ has proven little better, though I might add Folklore. Hybrid musks Felicia and Buff Beauty did well. Seafoam, New Dawn, and Playboy did well. So too, the climber Zephyrine Drouhin. I was happy with the David Austin roses Sophy's Rose, Mary Rose, Mary Webb, and Tess of the d'Ubervilles. I had some middling success with Scarlet Knight and Tournament of Roses (both grandifloras). I believe the multiflora element in them gave some protection, but I believe they succumed. The Griffith Buck rose Carefree Beauty was wonderful. (By contrast, Carefree Wonder made me wonder why it was named that.)

Griffith Buck roses generally have done well for me. I grow April Moon and Prairie Star here in AZ. Quietness, a glorious rose, collapsed from drought one year, although I suspect some gopher activity might have been involved. In any case, these roses have been pretty clean; and I would try any any Buck rose without hesitation. Similarly, many of the roses in the Canadian Explorer series are quite resistant.

I found Radler's Knock Out to be completely free of black spot. It was nicely branched and it tolerated some shade. I was surprised to find the blossoms lightly fragrant. I found the raspberry red bloom to be remarkably garden friendly. It's not a good cutting rose, perhaps; but it can be a wonderful garden plant. If I gardened in a place like PA or OH, and could grow just one rose, this would definitely be on my short list.

Here in AZ I garden in an arroyo. During the monsoons in July and August the air can get really damp and blackspot is an issue. I have been reminded how some of the early David Austin roses were blackspot magnets in NJ, and have had to sequester Winchester Cathedral because two years in a row it seems to have started the plague and infected the surrounding six or ten roses. Cressida, when I grew it in NJ, was probably worse. These two roses are, however, far more vigorous than most HTs and grandifloras, so they recover. Golden Celebration is right on the cusp. It is almost as prone to blackspot and not quite so vigorous. I was only just able to keep it alive in NJ. Here in AZ it's still a problem but BS does not create an existential crisis for the plant every single year as it did in NJ. I suspect Princess Alexandra of Kent might be as bad.

Crocus Rose and Lady of Shallott seem to me to be at the other end of the spectrum, hardly ever showing a spot of disease. I'm pleased with Claire Rose and Abe Darby in terms of disease resistance. Graham Thomas has been pretty clean. So, too, Ascot a HT with a cupped blossom resembling a DA rose and bred in Germany.

As a general rule, roses bred by Kordes or other German breeders (see Pallatine Roses as a source) tend to be less blackspot prone than roses bred by California breeders. Kardinal is a notable exception. I did lose it to blackspot. Bright yellows, reds, and oranges tend to be the most prone to black spot, but Berolina, Europeana, and South Africa have proven to be almost completely disease free in my experience.

Grande Dame, bred by Carruth and introduced by Weeks, seems completely free of black spot here in AZ. It's the only Carruth introduction that has not failed by one measure or another in my garden. (Apropos of nothing, it's also among the most resistant to our strange freeze-thaw cycling of all hybrid teas I've tried here. It does, however, grow into a great hard-to-control jumble and has not been very generous in bloom. For this it is on my shovel-prune watch list.)

Some minis do well. I don't think I've ever seen blackspot on Red Cascade, Gourmet Popcorn, Magic Dragon, or Rise 'n' Shine. Cupcake might not be quite so clean.

Some of the classic polyanthas are quite clean: Marie Pavie, Phyllis Bide, Caldwell Pink, Katherina Ziemet for example. Ditto some of the classic gallicas: Desiree Parmentier and Felicite Parmentier. The china rose Hermosa lacks fragrance but it has never shown any proclivity to black spot. Many rugosas have good blackspot resistance. A number of the wichuriana hybrid climbers such as New Dawn, City of York, and Rene Andre seem just about as immune. Wichurianas, though, can be a little more prone to powdery mildew.

As mentioned above, most hybrid musk roses seem to be pretty clean, although Ballerina always seems to suffer from black spot until the rose is well established. The climbers Zephyrine Drouhin, Ilse Krohn Superior, Red Eden, Chevy Chase, Malvern Hills, and Mme Alfred Carriere seem to be almost completely unaffected by black spot. There can be light spotting on old leaves that have come through the winter having not dropped from the plant.

Floribundas are a mixed bag. I've been completely wowed by Cherry Parfait, Day Breaker and Rainbow Sorbet. I've been disappointed by Sunsprite. Sunflare did well for me in NJ. I've never been able to get Iceberg to grow, so I don't know whether it's any good. Europeana certainly is. Pink Parfait has its moments. I have a whole bed of the vaunted Julia Child, and it succumbed to BS last year. Very disappointing. Harsh measures will be taken this year. I began spraying in February.

Marchioness of Londonderry seems immune. That's a great rose in an understated sort of way. It's an ARE offering bred in Northern Ireland more than a century ago. In general, the roses found at Antique Rose Emporium are pretty resistant to blackspot because much of the early stock was collected from Texas graveyards where roses grew untended for decades. The Earth Kind line of roses found there are reputed to be exceptionally disease resistant, even by ARE standards. The only rose that will survive the whole long list of insults (deer, javelina, blackspot, drought, poor soil, and so on) afforded by my unfenced front garden is Pink Pet, sold at ARE as Caldwell Pink.

In gardening, it seems to me, nothing is ever completely certain. Only a miniscule portion roses in commerce are completely resistant to all insults. Some roses prove completely free of rust or powdery mildew on the West Coast where these afflictions are common. These same roses may be found to be instantly defoliated by blackspot when planted more than 200 miles east of the Pacific Ocean. Similarly, roses found to be resistant to blackspot throughout the eastern 3/4 of the nation might be gobbled up by powdery mildew the moment they are planted in a zip code beginning with an 8 or 9.

I hope these guidelines and examples prove some help.
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Keeper of Poultry Farmer Roses Raises cows
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
porkpal
Mar 5, 2017 1:50 PM CST
I believe there are different strains of blackspot in different locales. I grow mostly old garden roses now, and they resist blackspot admirably, but I have tried modern ones in the past. A lot of the roses Steve has found to be fairly free of disease have not done well here - notably New Dawn, Europeana, and even some Knock outs. Sunsprite, on the other hand is one I can grow here. (I've never been able to grow Iceberg either!) Anyway I hope you get some answers from rose growers near you. That would be the the most promising advice.
Porkpal
Name: Ann
Central Texas (Zone 8b)
Halcyon
Mar 7, 2017 2:52 PM CST
I've never had problems with powdery mildew but then again, I never had BS until my last horrible bout which I continue to battle to this day. My Earth Kind Mrs. Dudley Cross gets a horrible case every year since then and Perle d' Or is not immune either. Crepuscule warded it off like a champ after I sprayed, but will get a mild case in the lower leaves. I have a suspicion my well water is also a factor. I had such a horrible case of BS that all my roses except AC had yucky yellow/orange diseased canes I had to prune out. I was lucky to go so many years without it rearing its ugly spotted head Smiling but once you get it that badly it is an every year defensive program to keep it in check .

tantefrancine
Mar 15, 2017 5:23 AM CST
I went to a Seminar in Maryland last year about roses without chemicals. The speaker, Peter E. Kukielski wrote a book, available also in Amazon, about 150 roses all labeled:
Disease resistance (1-60)--and explained that 55-60= superior resistence
Bloom (0-30)--21-30= profuse number of blooms
Fragrance (0-10) 7-10=very strong fragrance
Overal rating (1-100) --9-100 superior rose

I like the book very much. I do not have anything to do with P.E. Kukielski, I am not trying to advertise for him. He was the curator for 8 growing seasons of the New York Botanical Garden and renovated the garden and replanted new roses as New York does not allow using chemicals sprays in public gardens. I try to find this fact in the book, but I cannot find it.

On March 19th, there will be a program by the Potomac Rose Society called Growing Great Roses: March 19, 2017. 2:00 pm. Behnke Nurseries, 11300 Baltimore Ave, Beltsville, Maryland 20705. Free and open to the public. There will be another seminar in June about disease resistant roses, also sponsored by the Potomac Rose Society.
Long Island, NY (Zone 6b)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
MargieNY
Mar 16, 2017 11:04 AM CST
Ann, I think what you have to decide is whether you want to pursue treating the infected roses OR discard and replace them with something more resistant to diseases in your area.
Please read post 1387876
Maybe check out Tyler Rose garden.
http://www.visittyler.com/tyle...
Apparently you have some earthkind roses being tested in Texas also
http://aggie-horticulture.tamu...

I use OxiDate 2.0 (please note how OxiDate is spelled using upper and lower case letters) to CONTROL blackspot.
http://www.biosafesystems.com/...

I use the concentrate formula that gets diluted but it apparently comes in a ready to spray formula.
http://www.arbico-organics.com...

and a ready to use formula:
http://www.arbico-organics.com...

It's like a super strong hydrogen peroxide (OMRI)
Spray on leaves, canes, soil and ALL surrounding plants - start in early Spring - continue into Fall about every 10 - 12 days.
Note: these are merely suggestions. Good Luck
Name: Steve
Prescott, AZ (Zone 7b)
Region: Southwest Gardening Roses Irises Lilies
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Steve812
Mar 16, 2017 5:33 PM CST
I'm trying Actinovate this year, a bacterium that is supposed to work as a wide spectrum fungicide. I like the fact that it doesn't leave a strong chemical residue and that the fungicide can affect change in places not reached by the spray itself. It's available in one tiny size from Gardeners Supply and in an agricultural size from AM Leonard. I have also used potassium bicarbonate, sold as Green Cure and available through Amazon, and had success with it. Not much hazard with either, if one follows the precautions on the label. I still see signs of both blackspot and powdery mildew almost every summer, but I can respond to it and keep it in check.

I started spraying in February. I had some roses still clinging to last summer's leaves, and I wanted to get ahead of a blackspot problem that hit most of my yellow flowered roses last year. I'm hoping new leaves will stay healthy well into old age. Getting started early can be important because if infection establishes in young leaves, the plant is seriously weakened. It's a little less serious in leaves that approach the end of their natural lives.

Although I spray, I am a strong advocate of removing roses that persistently exprerience health problems. Cultivars prone to disease are best removed since doing so can improve the health of other roses. The first line of defense is resistant varieties. Sadly some of us rosomanes need a second line of defense to fend off flare-ups.

Name: Ann
Central Texas (Zone 8b)
Halcyon
Mar 20, 2017 8:19 AM CST
Margie, I think you are right, even if I replace the diseased roses with the same (disease free) variety. I will definitely try this OxiDate 2.0 because sometimes your roses are like family members ...some are a lot of trouble, but you still hang in there ! Thank you so much for the urls .
Name: Ann
Central Texas (Zone 8b)
Halcyon
Mar 20, 2017 8:30 AM CST
I just bought the book and a great price on Amazon ! I don't live in your neck of the woods but if anyone attends please pass on the highlights. Thanks,
tantefrancine .

tantefrancine
Apr 4, 2017 4:36 AM CST
I am starting to compile in one note book all the strong fragrant roses from the several books about roses that I have. I found out that there are 2 kinds of Cinderella roses. The one found in the books that I have is described as miniature, or even as micro-miniature blooms. The one that is described by Kukielski is a Shrub rose, or described as Floribunda with bigger roses hybridized by Kordes (2003). Palantineroses has it listed, but too late to order now. Just to warn people who wants to buy Cinderella rose to get the right one.
Kukielski mentioned in the seminar, everyone has different reactions to scents. I found that out myself. Several roses that I have purchased are supposed to have strong fragrance, but to me, they are not fragrant at all.
Name: Carol Sandt
Lancaster County, Pennsylvania (Zone 6b)
Peonies Butterflies Region: Mid-Atlantic Hibiscus Daylilies Xeriscape
Hostas Roses Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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csandt
Apr 4, 2017 8:44 AM CST
tantefrancine said: Kukielski mentioned in the seminar, everyone has different reactions to scents. I found that out myself. Several roses that I have purchased are supposed to have strong fragrance, but to me, they are not fragrant at all.


I discovered that too with 'Dark Desire" and 'Wedding Bells', both highly disease-resistant and supposedly fragrant, but no fragrance at all to my nose. On the other hand, 'Sunshine Daydream', registered as having no fragrance, had a very nice lemon fragrance in September, 2016, when I purchased it.
Carol Sandt
"Hope is the simple trust that God has not forgotten the recipe for manna.” - W. Paul Jones in "Trumpet at Full Moon"
Name: Steve
Prescott, AZ (Zone 7b)
Region: Southwest Gardening Roses Irises Lilies
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Steve812
Apr 4, 2017 8:48 AM CST
tantefrancine said:Several roses that I have purchased are supposed to have strong fragrance, but to me, they are not fragrant at all.


Fragrance is a very subjective experience and all sorts of things affect our sense of smell including foods, medications, and perfumes.

Sometimes the very same rose plant has different levels of fragrance under different conditions. The sweetest and most powerful rose fragrance event I have noticed was a single flower of Sombreuil on a relatively new plant from Antique Rose Emporium. I smelled it from more than 20 ft away, a powerful fragrance of tea and honeysuckle. I never did get that plant to produce the same scent - not to the same extent. My guess is that it needed more attentive care.

There are only a handful of roses I can think of that are fragrant with (nearly) complete reliability. But I only grow 200 cultivars.

Ambridge Rose always smells the same to me. David Austin calls the scent myrrh. Blanc Double de Coubert seems reliably fragrant with more of a spicy smell. Mme Isaac Perreire is a champion of old rose fragrance. Baronne Prevost does not reliably open in spring, here; but its open flowers are always seem fragrant to me: mostly fruit, I think, with some old rose. Isfahan is reliably fragrant, I believe. It's a delicious old rose scent that's hard to find in a lot of other roses, IME. I have been surprised to find that Darlow's Enigma has some scent - unless I am smelling the nearby honeysuckle. The blossoms of the climber Rosanna are reliably, if subtly, redolent of green apples.

The foliage of the eglantine rose (R.rubiginosa) smells like green apples. Graham Thomas advocates growing it for this quality. On a still, foggy spring morning a plant will project its green apple fragrance through a small yard.
N. Ohio (Zone 5b)
Bookworm The WITWIT Badge Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Native Plants and Wildflowers Roses
Tisha
Aug 19, 2017 11:43 AM CST

@MargieNY
Mar 16, 2017 12:04 PM CDT

Ann, I think what you have to decide is whether you want to pursue treating the infected roses OR discard and replace them with something more resistant to diseases in your area.
Please read post 1387876
How do I locate this post?


Name: Archivesgirl
Salisbury, MD (Zone 7b)
Cat Lover Enjoys or suffers hot summers Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Critters Allowed Region: Maryland Birds
Frogs and Toads
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Archivesgirl
Aug 19, 2017 12:13 PM CST
Alas, my mother grew beautiful roses (climbers, tea, American Beauties, etc.) back in the 1950s, 60s and 70s in suburban Maryland. I've never had much luck with them in Maryland -always black spot. As for fragrance, I lost my complete sense of smell back in 2002 due to a rare sleep disorder so my enjoyment is visual and any sense memory I have of what any roses smelled like.

@tantefrancine, I saw where you listed Behnke's Nursery (in Beltsville, MD). I lived not far from there and always shopped there.
N. Ohio (Zone 5b)
Bookworm The WITWIT Badge Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Native Plants and Wildflowers Roses
Tisha
Aug 19, 2017 2:22 PM CST
@MargieNY
Mar 16, 2017 12:04 PM CDT

Ann, I think what you have to decide is whether you want to pursue treating the infected roses OR discard and replace them with something more resistant to diseases in your area.
Please read post 1387876
How do I locate this post?
Sorry. Didn`t mean to double post!

[Last edited by Tisha - Aug 19, 2017 2:30 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1531431 (17)
Long Island, NY (Zone 6b)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
MargieNY
Aug 21, 2017 7:03 PM CST
Tree mail sent to Tisha with post #1387876.
Name: Zuzu
Northern California (Zone 9a)
Charter ATP Member Region: California Cat Lover Roses Clematis Irises
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier Garden Sages Forum moderator Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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zuzu
Aug 21, 2017 10:24 PM CST

Moderator

Why not just provide a link to it so everyone can see what you're talking about?

https://garden.org/thread/view...
Sydney, Australia (Zone 10b)
Protoavis
Aug 22, 2017 8:56 AM CST
Steve812 said:
The foliage of the eglantine rose (R.rubiginosa) smells like green apples. Graham Thomas advocates growing it for this quality. On a still, foggy spring morning a plant will project its green apple fragrance through a small yard.


Agreed. It does. I personally grow Lord Penzance (R.rubiginosa x Harison's Yellow (R.foetida x R.Spinosissima)), a feral R.rubiginosa (feral in the sense they are considered a weed and have escaped and spread throughout most of eastern/southern Australia...animals eat the hips and off the go) and a few seedings I've made using either as a parent (foliage fragrance only passes if used as the pod parent...R.rubiginosa has strange meiosis where the pollen passes only 1 chromosome but the egg passes 4).
Anyone with oryzalin (aka Surflan, Embargo), am looking for a small amount rather than 5litres from manufacturer (min size in Australia....)

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