Ask a Question forum: Peonies and Hibiscus

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Kentucky
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kybunnies
Feb 21, 2017 6:37 PM CST
Hello,

I have a peony and hibiscus plant that was my grandmothers. They have thrived in the same spot for over 40 years. I am moving and would like to take this flowers with me. But I am moving north to a colder area. The zip code is 44506. Would these plants survive in this area.
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
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sooby
Feb 21, 2017 7:02 PM CST
Welcome!

Yes to the peony, but it depends what kind of Hibiscus. Some are cold hardy and others are not. Do you know what kind it is or have a picture?
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Feb 21, 2017 7:07 PM CST
Welcome!

Where are these plants moving from? When you say Hibiscus, are you talking about a tropical Hibiscus or a Rose of Sharon? How big are they?

I did a zone look up based on your new zip code - you will be in Zone 5. Both Peony and Rose of Sharon are hardy in zone 5 but may need some winter protection.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Kentucky
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kybunnies
Feb 21, 2017 7:44 PM CST
I honestly do not know what type of Hibiscus. All I know it has been in the same stop for over 40 years. It has blood red blooms and grows to 3-4 feet tall.

What about tiger lilies and irises? I really would not like to lose any since they were my grandmothers. Sorry I do not have any pictures. When they were in bloom last year I did not know I would be moving.
[Last edited by kybunnies - Feb 21, 2017 8:03 PM (+)]
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Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Feb 21, 2017 8:48 PM CST
Bunnie,

We can help you decide what kind of Hibiscus if you will share with us where the Hibiscus is located.

All your plants can be moved if you are careful.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

Webmaster: osnnv.org
Kentucky
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kybunnies
Feb 21, 2017 9:39 PM CST
DaisyI said:Bunnie,

We can help you decide what kind of Hibiscus if you will share with us where the Hibiscus is located.

All your plants can be moved if you are careful.


I am in Kentucky. I can tell you the plant originally belonged to my great-grandmother. The hibiscus looks similar to this except it is red instead of yellow. I did not see any other images with similar leaves.

The hibiscus is in the side yard. It receives sun up until around noon and then has shade in the afternoon. It has what I call stalks that I cut down in late fall. It grows to be about 3-4 feet in height.


Thumb of 2017-02-22/kybunnies/4c61d8

Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
Feb 21, 2017 11:00 PM CST
It has got to be a Rose of Sharon. Kentucky is too cold for tropical Hibiscus. The sooner you move the plants, the better. Before they start coming out of dormancy.

I imagine the root system is pretty big for plants that old. Get as big a root ball as possible for the Rose of Sharon. The Peony has fat, fragile roots that bruise easily. Dig with care. You won't have to move dirt with the peony, iris or lily bulbs. Replant as soon as possible.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: Scott
Tampa FL (Westchase)
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ScotTi
Feb 22, 2017 3:30 AM CST
I am thinking it is the perennial Hibiscus (Rose Mallow), the stalks die back to the ground for the winter then emerge again the following spring. Hardy in zones 5-10.
[Last edited by ScotTi - Feb 22, 2017 3:37 AM (+)]
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Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
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sooby
Feb 22, 2017 6:55 AM CST
I was thinking that too, Scott, Hibiscus moscheutos. This picture was actually taken in Ohio according to its notes. This and all the other plants kybunnies mentioned will grow here in Zone 4 (with the probably exception of some irises) so should be fine in Zone 5 (I noticed though that while NGA gives zone 5 for that zip code the USDA hardiness zip code facility gives zone 6).


Kentucky
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kybunnies
Feb 22, 2017 9:19 AM CST
DaisyI said:It has got to be a Rose of Sharon. Kentucky is too cold for tropical Hibiscus. The sooner you move the plants, the better. Before they start coming out of dormancy.

I imagine the root system is pretty big for plants that old. Get as big a root ball as possible for the Rose of Sharon. The Peony has fat, fragile roots that bruise easily. Dig with care. You won't have to move dirt with the peony, iris or lily bulbs. Replant as soon as possible.


Thanks. I was planning on digging them up and planting within 4-5 days.
Kentucky
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kybunnies
Feb 22, 2017 9:21 AM CST
ScotTi said: I am thinking it is the perennial Hibiscus (Rose Mallow), the stalks die back to the ground for the winter then emerge again the following spring. Hardy in zones 5-10.


Yes the stalks die and I cut them back. I have learned that if I do not cut them back some are still around for the next blooming season. I do not know what type. I only want to take them with me when I go. Kind of like taking little pieces of my grandparents with me.
Kentucky
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kybunnies
Feb 22, 2017 9:24 AM CST
sooby said: I was thinking that too, Scott, Hibiscus moscheutos. This picture was actually taken in Ohio according to its notes. This and all the other plants kybunnies mentioned will grow here in Zone 4 (with the probably exception of some irises) so should be fine in Zone 5 (I noticed though that while NGA gives zone 5 for that zip code the USDA hardiness zip code facility gives zone 6).




Yes these look just like mine. Everything looks the same.

Thank you to everyone who helped. I greatly appreciate this.

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