Ask a Question forum: easy, no care

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Martye
Feb 26, 2017 5:48 AM CST
I just moved to NC , near Raleigh.
I want to create a no mow yard
Plants that require little care and little water, other than what rain we get

I thought to try the Thyme and mosses for a grass alternative

am planing a rock garden on the slope out front

will look in the back "woods" for plants I can bring up to my property

looks like someone, at one time, cut down trees and left them sitting there or fallen over and will have to get rid of those ( and call the owner of the property lot next door to take care of it)

all help is welcome
thank you
Name: Sally
central Maryland
Seriously addicted to kettle chips.
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sallyg
Feb 26, 2017 6:22 AM CST
I suggest you identify any 'woods' plants before deciding to use them.
Rock garden on the slope sounds nice. Moss phlox is popular for a slope, spring bloom, will spread over years. I would place rocks and a good solid mulch cover while getting plants started that will eventually spread.
Your lawn alternative- sun or shade?
Your slope, faces what direction? Dry, or is it the bottom or more sloping uphill behind you?
..come into the peace of wild things..-Wendell Berry
Life is a buffet (anon)
Name: Caroline Scott
Calgary (Zone 4a)
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CarolineScott
Feb 26, 2017 9:09 AM CST
Maybe some of those logs and stumps could become a Permaculture vegetable garden? There are "no mow" mixtures or lawn alternative mixtures of seeds. Often the mixtures are made for certain climates or situations. Reseeding annuals and biennials are a carefree addition.
springfield MO area (Zone 6a)
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Frillylily
Feb 26, 2017 9:29 AM CST
how big of a space are you working with? A no mow lawn is a lot of work. Have you considered growing a prairie style area (if the area is large). A mixture of coneflowers, black eyed susans, daisies, lupines, straw flowers, maybe add some historic iris or ditch daylilies, they are very hardy add color and not require hardly any maintenance and will thrive with low water.

You may consider putting down several layers of weed barrier, adding a few inches of gravel over that and then putting raised beds in for your herbs.

Name: Cheryl
Texas (Zone 9a)
Region: Texas Greenhouse Plant Identifier Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Plumerias Ponds
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ShadyGreenThumb
Feb 26, 2017 10:42 AM CST
I have no mow Dwarf Monkry Grass in my shaded back yard. Evergreen, freeze safe but we don't get snow. Slooooow growing so plug very close together. In the larger area, i incorporated pieces of flagstone to break it up. It's a nice look. Welcome!
Life is short, Break the rules, Forgive quickly, Kiss slowly, Love Truly, Laugh
uncontrollably, And never regret anything that made you Smile.
Name: Philip Becker
Fresno California (Zone 8a)
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Philipwonel
Feb 26, 2017 11:08 AM CST
Have you considered catus and succulents?
Some tolerate cold.
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Name: Elaine
Sarasota, Fl
The one constant in life is change
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dyzzypyxxy
Feb 26, 2017 12:00 PM CST
Hi and welcome. May I add to all the good advice above that most of those wonderful perennials do require watering, mulch and a little fertilizer until they get established. So you can't expect "no care" or even low maintenance for the first year or two until you figure out what works and what you like then get them established. Even the most drought tolerant groundcovers need some coddling to get them going.

I'd advise starting with a small area near your house (within hose reach) first, and experiment to see what the plants look like after one growing season. If you have a local nursery that specializes in native plants, that's the place to go and buy. You'll find lots of good advice at such a place, too. Home Depot, Lowe's and Wal-Mart do not generally have either native plants, or staff with good advice.

Btw, the term "no care" really doesn't apply to anything but - maybe! - a wildflower garden. Even carefully planned xeriscape needs some maintenance to look nice. "Easy" in my mind is a much better goal to set for yourself. Perennials, shrubs and groundcovers suited to your climate, plus mulch or pathways of pavers or some such, so that you can walk through and enjoy what you plant.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." โ€“Winston Churchill
Name: greene
Savannah, GA (Sunset 28) (Zone 8b)
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greene
Feb 26, 2017 12:05 PM CST
I don't want to sound discouraging but...it takes a whole lot of work to plan and plant a "no care" garden.
Yes, it is well worth the effort so please keep researching; keep notes and take photos as you proceed so others can benefit from your experience. Thumbs up
Sunset Zone 28, AHS Heat Zone 9, USDA zone 8b~"Leaf of Faith"
Name: Cheryl
Texas (Zone 9a)
Region: Texas Greenhouse Plant Identifier Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Plumerias Ponds
Foliage Fan Enjoys or suffers hot summers Tropicals Garden Ideas: Master Level Garden Sages Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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ShadyGreenThumb
Feb 26, 2017 1:37 PM CST
Thumb of 2017-02-26/ShadyGreenThumb/2d8b58


Thumb of 2017-02-26/ShadyGreenThumb/bf2d02

Life is short, Break the rules, Forgive quickly, Kiss slowly, Love Truly, Laugh
uncontrollably, And never regret anything that made you Smile.
Name: Sally
central Maryland
Seriously addicted to kettle chips.
Charter ATP Member Native Plants and Wildflowers Region: Mid-Atlantic Composter Region: Maryland Birds
Cat Lover Dog Lover Region: United States of America
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sallyg
Feb 26, 2017 4:49 PM CST
With all due respect, to Philip, I don't think you should try any cacti. True you could grw some prickly pears, (I do up here) but they WILL get weeds in them and then be very painful to clean up.
A friend here decided to be very butterfly/moth friendly. She added beds in her small backyard with flowers and just quit mowing her lawn between. The grass got long and sort of lays and swirls. So far, it doesn't look near as messy as it sounds.

The woods right now are about at their barest and brownest. Might surprise you in the next month or two.
..come into the peace of wild things..-Wendell Berry
Life is a buffet (anon)

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