Ask a Question forum: Indian Corn

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bernadetteroy
Feb 26, 2017 5:04 PM CST
I am a preschool teacher. We took an ear of Indian Corn and soaked it in water for an experiment. The seeds formed roots. Each student was able to plant a feed seeds to take home and care for. I have one student that has successfully been able to grow hers to about 36 - 40". The corn stalk now has little purple seedlike things growing. beginning to look like an ear of corn. It does not look like a typical ear of corn. I am just wondering if this is normal. My students are extremely excited about this one plant that has been growing since October.

Any information you could provide would be greatly appreciated. I have googled life cycle of Indian Corn but cannot find much.

Thanks for any feedback you may provide. My students will be excited. They are 3 and 4 years old.

Bernadette
Thumb of 2017-02-26/bernadetteroy/8e9495

[Last edited by bernadetteroy - Feb 28, 2017 2:58 AM (+)]
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Name: Scott
Tampa FL (Westchase)
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ScotTi
Feb 26, 2017 5:28 PM CST
It may be a little hard to explain to 3 and 4 yr olds, but what you have there at the top of the corn stalk are the male flowers. The female flowers will appear as silks where the leaf is attached to the stalk.
[Last edited by ScotTi - Feb 26, 2017 5:29 PM (+)]
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Name: Sandy B.
Ford River, Michigan UP (Zone 4b)
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Weedwhacker
Feb 26, 2017 5:34 PM CST
Welcome to NGA, @bernadetteroy .

Although it looks a little unusual to me, it appears that the structure in question is going to be the "tassel" that will produce pollen to fertilize the ears of corn (which will form later).

Congratulations to that student (and his/her parent? Smiling ) for nurturing that corn stalk so successfully! Thumbs up

I would also suggest editing your post to remove your email address, as this is a public forum. Smiling
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Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
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stone
Feb 27, 2017 7:56 AM CST
I often see grains of corn growing in the tassel of the corn.
This is unlikely in your stalk.

A corn stalk typically has a tassel at the top, and emerging ears show up just above one or more of the leaves. Your tassel still needs time to form.

As corn is wind pollinated, getting the ears to produce kernels (from a single stalk) will require hand pollination.... After the tassel has fully formed, and the hairy ears shoW themselves.... Pluck some of the oat-looking "seeds" from tassel, and place on 'hair'.

After hair turns brown, there should be kernels of corn forming.

Thumb of 2017-02-27/stone/5dd2df
Pic of corn stalks with tassels and ears.

Thumb of 2017-02-27/stone/e0b558
Close up of tassel, and tape measure showing height of stalk.
[Last edited by stone - Feb 27, 2017 8:02 AM (+)]
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