Ask a Question forum: Silly Question - Do I need a water filter?

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KellyTgardener
Feb 28, 2017 2:33 PM CST
This seems silly and maybe I'm imagining it, but I swear when I water my window pots with water from my Brita pitcher, they seem healthier. I've been watering one with filtered water and the other with normal tap water, and the filtered one has several mor flowers and seems stronger in general. I wonder if I ought to install some kind of filter for my hose outside to water my rose gardens? Does this make any sense at all, or am I dreaming it!? :)
Name: woofie
NE WA (Zone 5a)
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woofie
Feb 28, 2017 2:38 PM CST
Is your water chlorinated? I think that's one of the things that the Brita filters remove?
Confidence is that feeling you have right before you do something really stupid.
Name: Lin
Florida Zone 9b, 10a

Region: United States of America Deer Region: Florida Charter ATP Member Million Pollinator Garden Challenge I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
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plantladylin
Feb 28, 2017 2:38 PM CST
Hi KellyTgardener, Welcome!
Your filter will take out chlorine, fluoride and some metals (like lead and copper) from the tap water which is a good thing! So, I don't think you are imagining it at all, the plants are probably happier because they are getting a more purified water.
~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot! ~


Name: Lin
Florida Zone 9b, 10a

Region: United States of America Deer Region: Florida Charter ATP Member Million Pollinator Garden Challenge I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Procrastinator Birds Butterflies Bee Lover Hummingbirder Container Gardener
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plantladylin
Feb 28, 2017 2:40 PM CST
Green Grin! Cross posted with woofie!
~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot! ~


Name: woofie
NE WA (Zone 5a)
Charter ATP Member Garden Procrastinator Greenhouse Dragonflies Plays in the sandbox I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
The WITWIT Badge I helped plan and beta test the plant database. Dog Lover Enjoys or suffers cold winters Container Gardener Seed Starter
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woofie
Feb 28, 2017 2:44 PM CST
Yes, but you posted a more detailed response, Lin. Smiling
I think house plants are more sensitive, partly because they are in a more confined environment. We had chlorinated water where I lived in SoCal, and it never seemed to cause any problems with the outdoor plants.
Confidence is that feeling you have right before you do something really stupid.
Name: Lin
Florida Zone 9b, 10a

Region: United States of America Deer Region: Florida Charter ATP Member Million Pollinator Garden Challenge I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Procrastinator Birds Butterflies Bee Lover Hummingbirder Container Gardener
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plantladylin
Feb 28, 2017 2:56 PM CST
Some cities use a lot more chlorine in their water than others. At out old house, the city water was so heavily chlorinated you could smell it when you turned on the tap! I try to use filtered water for my indoor plants, the outside plants get watered from the irrigation system; which is well water.
~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot! ~


Name: Cindy
Hobart, IN zone 5
aka CindyMzone5
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
Shadegardener
Feb 28, 2017 3:07 PM CST
Certain plants are more sensitive to the chemicals in city tap water. I think spider plants are one of them.
Only when the last tree has died and the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught will we realize that we can't eat money. Cree proverb
Name: J.R. Baca
Pueblo West Co. ( High Dessert (Zone 6a)
josebaca
Mar 1, 2017 4:14 PM CST
KellyT; Welcome!
Hello from Southern Colorado! Aside from all the stuff already mentioned, it needs to be said that if you live east of the Mississippi you will have calcium in your water as well (with the exception of constantly rainy areas like the P.N.W.). I'd go with a calcium filter first and see how that works out.
Smiling

KellyTgardener
Mar 1, 2017 7:58 PM CST
Thank you very much for your replies, very helpful and they make a lot of sense!

josebaca said:KellyT; Welcome!
Hello from Southern Colorado! Aside from all the stuff already mentioned, it needs to be said that if you live east of the Mississippi you will have calcium in your water as well (with the exception of constantly rainy areas like the P.N.W.). I'd go with a calcium filter first and see how that works out.
Smiling


Hmm, I'm not too familiar with calcium filters. I googled a little, does this look like the right kind of calcium filter? justaddcleanwater.com/found-best-water-filter-remove-calcium/ I'm not sure how I could attach a hose to my sink but I guess I could make it work! Thanks for your help. Hurray!
Name: Rick R.
Minneapolis, MN, USA zone 4
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Leftwood
Mar 1, 2017 8:47 PM CST
plantladylin said:Some cities use a lot more chlorine in their water than others. At out old house, the city water was so heavily chlorinated you could smell it when you turned on the tap!


Not exactly correct. Some cities use different forms of chlorine in their water. Most are moving toward the use of chloramines rather than the chlorine that will evaporate out of water. Chloramine forms are relatively stable in water and have the propensity to cause more plant damage because more of the chlorine stays in the soil longer. This is very unfortunate for us plant growers. Conversely, the chlorine added to water that can evaporate from water is much less detrimental, and if you allow your water to set out for a few hours or more before your water plants, it is benign because it is essentially not in the water anymore.

So if you smell chlorine in your municipal water, that is a good thing: you know that you can easily remove it from the water. There is no simple way to remove chloramines other than filters of some type. Your city office should be able to tell you if your water is treated with chloramines, and while you're at it, they can tell you the pH range that they maintain, too.


Edited for grammar
[Last edited by Leftwood - Mar 2, 2017 8:35 AM (+)]
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Name: Steve Claggett
Portland Orygun (Zone 8a)
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madcratebuilder
Mar 2, 2017 8:20 AM CST
Leftwood said:

Not exactly correct. Some cities use different forms of chlorine in their water. Most are moving toward the use of chloramines rather than the chlorine that will evaporate out of water. Chloramine forms are relatively stable in water and have the propensity to cause more plant damage because more of the chlorine stays in the soil longer. This is very unfortunate for us plant growers. Conversely, the chlorine added to water that can evaporate from water is much less detrimental, and if you allow your water to set out for a few hours or more before your water plants, it is benign because it is essentially not in the water anymore.

So if you smell chlorine in your municipal water, that is a good thing: you know that you can easily remove it from the water. There is no simple way to remove chloramines other than filters of some type. Your city office should be able to tell you if your water is treated with chloramines, and while your at it, they can tell you the pH range that they maintain, too.



I agree 100%. I keep 3 gallon containers full so I always have water that has out gassed the chlorine. Chloramines need a filter to remove. There are $30 "spa" inline hose filters that can filter thousands of gallons. I use one for outdoor potted plants.

Spectamur agendo
Name: Mary
Glendale, Arizona (Zone 9b)
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Azgarden
Mar 18, 2017 11:53 AM CST
Any recommendations on how to filter chlorine/chloramine out of hose water? We live in the desert and have a lot to water. The inline filters I've seen are the throwaway types. Is there some type in which you could change out the filter? We hand water everything with a garden hose. Confused Thank you for any help.
Name: Steve Claggett
Portland Orygun (Zone 8a)
Beekeeper Cat Lover
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madcratebuilder
Mar 19, 2017 8:11 AM CST
A hose filter like this should work. I've found if you seal them in a baggie when not using they last longer.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01EVRTZA8/
Spectamur agendo

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