Houseplants forum: Looking for advice on two ailing plants

Views: 483, Replies: 6 » Jump to the end
Name: Dave
Brooklyn, NY
ddellacosta
Mar 5, 2017 3:26 PM CST
Hi folks, I have two plants which I'm trying to save.

One is a parlor palm I believe, and from what I've read the pattern of leaf browning suggests underwatering, which makes sense as I tend to water less rather than more. I've stepped up my watering regime, explicitly checking a few times a week to see if the soil is dry, and I think it's recovering. New growth seems to be continuing in a healthy fashion and I haven't seen a steep increase in browning in the past few weeks, but I wanted to get some other opinions on if I'm on the right path or not, or if there's something else I'm missing:

Thumb of 2017-03-05/ddellacosta/b87279

In my previous apartment, it was in an extremely bright south-facing window for about a year, with no apparent harm done, although from my reading recently I've realized that perhaps these aren't the best lighting conditions for this plant. It's currently still near south facing windows but somewhat indirect, compared to before at least (see photo).

Speaking of bad lighting conditions (or at least what I suspect to be), I've got another plant which I don't know the name of, and which I've had a hard time identifying, so my first question is if anyone knows what this may be:

Thumb of 2017-03-05/ddellacosta/04381e
Thumb of 2017-03-05/ddellacosta/a3c3b9
Thumb of 2017-03-05/ddellacosta/2ef5ee

It was also in south-facing, very bright direct sunlight conditions for about a year before I moved, and it's been suffering for a while, but is tough and seems to want to live. I want to help it thrive instead of continuing to kill it, so any advice would be most appreciated! As opposed to a water deficiency (what I originally thought the issue was), I started to believe it was getting too much light, so I moved it away from the windows to a more partially lit area, somewhat behind some other plants. This _seems_ to be helping as I haven't seen more damage on newer leaves, but I would love to really nail down what this plant needs.

Thanks in advance for any help you can provide!

Best,
Dave
[Last edited by ddellacosta - Mar 5, 2017 3:27 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1383409 (1)
Name: Dave
Brooklyn, NY
ddellacosta
Mar 5, 2017 3:43 PM CST
Hmm, poking around just now, in The thread "What's your best "back from the dead" plant(s)?" in Houseplants forum, I saw someone with a similar plant (second photo down): https://garden.org/thread/view...

Do I have an anthurium on my hands here?
Name: Carter Mayer
Houston, TX (Zone 9b)
Tropicals Adeniums Plant Identifier
Image
Carter
Mar 6, 2017 2:54 PM CST
I don't have time for a full repsonse at the moment, but, yes, your second plant is an anthurium. I'll pop back in here this evening when I can re-read and give you a more thorough response (if someone else hasn't by then already)! Thumbs up
Name: Carter Mayer
Houston, TX (Zone 9b)
Tropicals Adeniums Plant Identifier
Image
Carter
Mar 6, 2017 8:33 PM CST
Ok, so read through your posts. I think you are on the right track with you parlor palm. As for the anthurium, in general many anthuriums (and palms) require a higher humidity than what they will receive indoors. If you can mist the whole plant several times a day with a spray bottle that may help (the Palm will appreciate it, too!). Most anthuriums also like high light, but direct sun thru a window may be too strong for it. I don't know where you are located, but as soon as the temps regularly get above 60F with highs above 65-70F it would be very beneficial to put it outside in a brightly shaded spot. Most anthuriums like to be moist but not wet.

I think your own research has you on a good path. Thumbs up
Name: Dave
Brooklyn, NY
ddellacosta
Mar 7, 2017 9:30 AM CST
Carter, thanks so much for your thoughtful reply! That's really helpful information, exactly what I was hoping for.

I'll go out and get a spray bottle today, it's something I've meant to do for a while but now I know it's more critical than I realized.

I'm in NYC actually, so right now it's a bit chilly...of course the bigger problem is that I don't have any yard to put these guys in the warm weather (I wish I did...a lack of space is certainly one of the big drawbacks to city living). But I'll file that away for the day I can do such a thing, good to know.

Thanks again for your help--I really appreciate it.

Best,
Dave

EDIT: I just realized I should change my profile so it's more obvious where I am...!
[Last edited by ddellacosta - Mar 7, 2017 9:38 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1384441 (5)
Name: Carter Mayer
Houston, TX (Zone 9b)
Tropicals Adeniums Plant Identifier
Image
Carter
Mar 7, 2017 3:05 PM CST
You are welcome! One of the best things it sounds like you are doing is checking the soil before watering rather than just watering on a specific schedule. Letting the plant tell you when it needs water rather than the other way around leads to everyone being happier in the long run! You've already figured out that trying a set schedule can lead to underwatering - or worse - overwatering.

Plus, once a month or so, both of those plants will love being stuck in the shower for a little while to give them a good drenching as well as to help rinse out salt & mineral build ups that come from normal watering and fertilizing. These build ups can eventually lead to the death of the plant if not taken care of. Don't panic, though, depending on your water quality it would probably take at least 6 months to a year before these buildups would start affecting you plants - and that is if you did nothing at all. Repotting once a year to 2 years will also keep this in check.
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
Image
WillC
Mar 12, 2017 5:02 PM CST
Hi Dave,

It may not matter to you, but to set the record straight your Palm is an Areca Palm, not a Parlor Palm, which tends to be smaller. The care is similar, although the Areca needs more light. Keep yours close to a moderately sunny window. Water thoroughly as soon as the top half inch of soil feels dry.

The loss of yellow fronds at the base is inevitable, but as long as you are getting a comparable number of new fronds up top, you needn't worry.

But do worry about spider mites as this plant, like most Palms, is a magnet for spider mites. Check weekly for early signs of these critters. They are a lot easier to control when caught and treated early.

~Will Creed
NYC
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Houseplants forum
You must first create a username and login before you can reply to this thread.

Member Login:

Username:

Password:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by GaNinFl and is called "Old Mill Courtyard"