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North Central TX (Zone 8a)
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tx_flower_child
Mar 9, 2017 11:38 AM CST
Long story which I won't go into (you're welcome) but I need a pathway using some type of hardscape material. And no, this is not a DYI project. My house was built in the 40s so need something that's not very contemporary looking. Won't be too much foot traffic but mulch alone isn't enough. With that in mind, what are some hardscape materials that I should consider?
I can provide more details such as length of path (after I attempt to measure it) etc if helpful.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Mar 9, 2017 11:53 AM CST
For a 40's house, I would think either brick (the old fashioned red kind) for a more formal look. Or stone pavers for a more casual look. I like schist and sandstone pavers and have used both. I don't like slate as it disintegrates with the freeze/thaw cycles.
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Name: greene
Savannah, GA (Sunset 28) (Zone 8b)
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greene
Mar 9, 2017 6:50 PM CST
Definitely some good old red brick would work; you may be able to buy what they call 'used brick'.
There are concrete brick pavers also. If installed correctly, the rain will filter through and not create a run-off problem. If it is not a DIY project, I'd sugest that you keep away from any diagonal lines as they increase cutting cost and produce waste. A simple design such as 'basketweave' is a good choice - the size of the brick will determine the width of the walkway with no waste and no cutting.
Sunset Zone 28, AHS Heat Zone 9, USDA zone 8b~"Leaf of Faith"
Name: woofie
NE WA (Zone 5a)
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woofie
Mar 9, 2017 7:00 PM CST
There's also those concrete paver molds in various patterns. Fairly simple to do and relatively inexpensive. I know you said not DIY, so I'm not sure if a professional would do that sort of thing.
https://www.quikrete.com/athom...
Confidence is that feeling you have right before you do something really stupid.
Name: greene
Savannah, GA (Sunset 28) (Zone 8b)
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greene
Mar 9, 2017 7:12 PM CST
I am sending you a photo via Treemail.
Sunset Zone 28, AHS Heat Zone 9, USDA zone 8b~"Leaf of Faith"
North Central TX (Zone 8a)
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tx_flower_child
Mar 9, 2017 10:07 PM CST
Thank you all for your answers. I should have mentioned from the git go that I want an informal look. And not a straight straight line. A little on the hippy dippy side. But the other night I spent hours reading about hardscape and ended up more confused than I was to start with.

I love brick and can see doing it on a side path. But since my house is part brick (kinda grayish blue-ish green), I'd have to find some of those old off-white bricks if I were to use bricks in front. (No one but me would see the side path so that actually could be red brick.} OMG. Now I've got an 'Follow the Yellow Brick Road' earworm running thru my head.

@Daisyl - you mentioned something called 'schist'. Haven't had time to google that yet but am curious as I've not heard that term before.

@woofie - you've brought up a good point and it's actually part of my dilemma. I definitely cannot even attempt to do this myself. Aside from my innate ineptitude, some minor health issues also factor in. And I'm guessing it's probably too small a project to get a professional to do. One person gave me a quote in January and then was out of town for almost a month. When I was finally able to talk to him again he said he couldn't do anything for me until July. In the meantime I'm playing telephone tag with someone else. And expected I'd hear from a 3rd person today.

Well I'm ok if it doesn't rain much. Otherwise I've got to get some good mucksters to walk around the yard in.

Any thoughts about pricing - as in are bricks more expensive than sandstone or concrete or whatever? (Just in general.)

Again, thanks everyone.

Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Mar 9, 2017 10:33 PM CST
First, no one ever said brick paths needed to be straight. Smiling

Schist is a metamorphic rock that is often used as pavers. It is really common on the west coast. It is golds and silvers and sparkly. I have built a lot of schist paths but I don't put the stones edge to edge (fit them together) but rather build a free form path with them. Sort of like this:

https://www.google.com/search?...:

It may not be called schist (I am the mother and the daughter of geologists so don't always know the names given by landscaping companies). You might contact a landscaping company or local nursery that sells gravel and stones.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Name: woofie
NE WA (Zone 5a)
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woofie
Mar 10, 2017 11:03 AM CST
And as far as those paver molds go, you don't really need a "professional." It's pretty easy to do (I've done a couple myself) so a handyman could probably do a decent job for you if you wanted to go that route.

Another option is just a nice gravel walkway. That's what we've done here. We had a high school boy help scrape down the pathway, laid down plastic, put down a border of bricks to weight down the plastic and keep the gravel from escaping, then covered the plastic with a couple of inches of gravel. It's all covered with snow right now, so I can't post a pic.
Confidence is that feeling you have right before you do something really stupid.
Name: greene
Savannah, GA (Sunset 28) (Zone 8b)
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greene
Mar 10, 2017 11:22 AM CST
Okay, this is not a path or walkway but I was able to do this myself and I am a handicapped/handicapable person.The first photo shows that I leveled the area, laid down heavy duty landscape fabric, added a layer of sand (because it was free), then added the concrete patio blocks.
Thumb of 2017-03-10/greene/dc6e5d

I did not realize that the patio blocks were 3 different colors so it didn't turn out like a checkerboard, but it was much easier to walk on and kept everything a lot cleaner than just walking on the existing ground. Each block cost $1.28.
Thumb of 2017-03-10/greene/344ec3 Thumb of 2017-03-10/greene/214b39

There is a nice paving stone at Home Depot that might be a good color for you. Here is a link. It would cost more than the concrete patio blocks but would look better and probably be much stronger.
https://www.google.com/shoppin...

Use the keywords "pavestone company rumblestone walkway" in a Google Image search to see finished walkways made with the Rumblestones.
Sunset Zone 28, AHS Heat Zone 9, USDA zone 8b~"Leaf of Faith"
Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
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stone
Mar 10, 2017 11:57 AM CST
While greene's idea has merit.... Using a wheelbarrow on such a path is difficult.
Edit:
(i meant the first picture.... Sorry greene.)

Maybe tell us more about what use you intend to put the path...

Personally, I like the gravel path idea.... There is a reason that gravel is used for roads... Just avoid trying to get too fancy.... Using round pebbles produces a pretty walk that can not be walked on... Or use a wheelbarrow on.
There an abundance of gravel types suitable... Using something small is better than using the two inch stuff... And... You can place brick directly on the small gravel later if you decide to go that route.

Just be aware that nature abhors a vacuum, and stuff will grow between the rocks, and bricks...

Maybe check out those driveway pavers made to disappear in the lawn...
[Last edited by stone - Mar 10, 2017 12:11 PM (+)]
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Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
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porkpal
Mar 10, 2017 12:07 PM CST
Would you consider decomposed granite?
Porkpal
Name: Arlene
Southold, Long Island, NY (Zone 7a)
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pirl
Mar 10, 2017 12:11 PM CST
Instead of the very straight paths we had when this was our vegetable garden, I wanted something nicer as I changed it to flowers (and a few vegetables). The cost was around $3,000. in 2013.
Thumb of 2017-03-10/pirl/cd245e

Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
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tarev
Mar 10, 2017 12:15 PM CST
We have brick pavers for my sideyard.

There are so many shapes, designs and layout you can choose from, just depends how much time, effort and money you can spare. Initially hubby was thinking he can do it as DIY..but I convinced him better let the pros do it..I am glad we did, it is really much involved work, but if you feel like doing it, it could be a real interesting project.

Here is how our sideyard looks like with the pavers before all the plants came in:
Thumb of 2017-03-10/tarev/88877e Thumb of 2017-03-10/tarev/478e5e
Thumb of 2017-03-10/tarev/3e85e2 Thumb of 2017-03-10/tarev/f6e0a3

Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Mar 10, 2017 12:42 PM CST
This a photo of part of the path through my yard. I wasn't taking a photo of it (those are my blooming pitcher plants in the foreground) so you will have to look past the flowers to the path. It is made of sandstone pavers from Home Depot. My only issue with the sandstone is that I break one once in awhile (dropping things like rocks on them). I planted creeping thyme between them.

Thumb of 2017-03-10/DaisyI/10bde1

Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: woofie
NE WA (Zone 5a)
Charter ATP Member Garden Procrastinator Greenhouse Dragonflies Plays in the sandbox I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
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woofie
Mar 10, 2017 12:50 PM CST
You know, in another thread I saw something about using crushed, tumbled glass for walkways rather than gravel. I'll see if I can find it.
Ah, here it is:
The thread "Using Recylcled Glass as Mulch in the Garden" in Garden Art forum
Confidence is that feeling you have right before you do something really stupid.
North Central TX (Zone 8a)
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tx_flower_child
Mar 10, 2017 1:15 PM CST
@porkpal - impeccable timing. I was just mentioning decomppsed granite (DG) to someone.
I love it, the earth loves it, and have even seen both paths and patios made solely of DG.

I have large oaks as do my neighbors. And boy did we have a bumper crop of acorns this year. I currently have a solid pathway of acorns on one side of my house. Need a sign saying 'slippery when wet' or maybe just plain 'slippery'.
Not sure how one could clean acorns and even leaves from DG without removing a lot of the DG. Or maybe that's a non-issue.
I definitely can see using it between stepping stones, pavers, or whatever.

Seeing a lot of good ideas. And I will write a post re why I'm needing some type of path/walk way. I'm using my phone and will answer when I get to my computer. Might even be able to scrounge up a few pictures. So stay tuned and I'll give y'all more info.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Mar 10, 2017 1:20 PM CST
The DG never packs down so you would still need some stepping stones.

For some reason, we use a lot of DG here in Reno. I say 'for some reason' because it blows away in the wind and it floats away during summer thunder storms.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Name: Carol
Santa Ana, ca
Sunset zone 22, USDA zone 10 A.
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ctcarol
Mar 10, 2017 1:39 PM CST
I used the schist stone set in sand for mine and it can be swept or blown clean easily. The hard part is getting it level enough that it isn't a tripping hazard. It takes a two wheel dolly easily enough, but for wheelchair or wheelbarrow it would be a bit harder.
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Keeper of Poultry Farmer Roses Raises cows
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porkpal
Mar 10, 2017 4:10 PM CST
In our often wet and always humid weather DG does pack and ends up resembling crude pavement.
Porkpal
North Central TX (Zone 8a)
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tx_flower_child
Mar 10, 2017 9:57 PM CST
Well, no more reference s to DG. Don't want to confuse anyone. I'm already confused which is mainly why I posed the question. I read terms: pavers, stones, stepping stones, flagstone, sandstone, slate, concrete, stamped concrete, poured concrete, rocks, gravel, etc., and it's like a brain twister.

I had wintercreeper for a groundcover. It was like a trip wire. Very easy to slide your foot underneath or in between it and you're on your face. So I started snipping it. And then it really grew. And grew. Became shrubs and the roots became a thick mass that could easily break one's toe.
Thumb of 2017-03-11/tx_flower_child/0e86d2 Thumb of 2017-03-11/tx_flower_child/98a4fe

The sneaky underground roots went far and wide, going under metal edging and choking out some mahonias. (I always wondered why those mahonias never grew well.)

Last fall I managed to get all of the 'shrubs' up but not out. Although I'm slowly digging up those dang roots, they are tough little devils. (No. None of the yard people who have worked for me will dig up the roots.)

Whatever the original stepping stones are made of, I couldn't tell you. I only know that they weren't placed at my pace. So the workers added a few more but w/out much thought.
Here's what some look like. (Ignore the cheap-o stepstone I added while I was working in that particular area. Didn't help.) The whole area has been covered with acorns and I alternate between gathering up acorns and digging roots. Since the acorns are an annual event, I don't want to use any type of gravel for filler.

Thumb of 2017-03-11/tx_flower_child/40b1d7 Thumb of 2017-03-11/tx_flower_child/ce8f4a

My feeling is that if I can get more of the original pavers-stepping stones to widen the path a little as well as to fill in places, I'll be happy. Not knowing what they are isn't helpful. I might have to stack them somewhere for future use and that's where the 'what type of hardscape' comes into play. It's what would I use to replace them.

Since I started explaining all of this I talked with someone who I think can do the work. Just hoping she can find some hardscape that matches or will coordinate.

Thank you everyone. Apologies for writing a book. But in writing this it has cleared my mind and I know how to go forward. Just don't know all that hardscape lingo.

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