Ask a Question forum: is it possible to make navel oranges taste sweet when fruits are ripening ?

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steve923
Mar 15, 2017 5:16 PM CST
i have a navel orange tree, fruits from last year's harvest tasted really sour;
this year the fruits are starting to ripen, i wonder if there is any way to make the fruits less acidic.
Thanks in advance
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Keeper of Poultry Farmer Roses Raises cows
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porkpal
Mar 15, 2017 6:21 PM CST
Are you confident that llast year's oranges were fully ripe?
Porkpal
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Mar 15, 2017 7:39 PM CST
Good point. An orange orange does not necessarily mean a ripe orange. The color is a temperature thing - the colder the weather, the oranger the orange. You need to figure out what type of orange you have and when it should be ripe in your area.

If you have no idea, pick an orange every week and taste it. You may be surprised to find out you were picking them 2 months too early.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Keeper of Poultry Farmer Roses Raises cows
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
porkpal
Mar 15, 2017 8:59 PM CST
I find that if you wait until the orange almost falls off into your hand, you can be sure it is as ripe as it is going to get.
Porkpal
Name: Philip Becker
Fresno California (Zone 8a)
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Philipwonel
Mar 17, 2017 2:25 PM CST
Steve. Welcome!
It would help alot, if we knew where you lived.
I live in navel country.
Navels need some light frost to ripen.

I'm not sure, about now or future, but it wouldnt hurt to try something a friend told me. Bury a few pounds of non-galvanized nails around tree. The rust from nails, will sweeten up oranges.
๐Ÿ˜Ž๐Ÿ˜Ž๐Ÿ˜Ž
Anything i say, could be misrepresented, or wrong.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
Mar 17, 2017 2:42 PM CST
Yep, my Dad used to do that too.

Only thing rusty nails will get you is tetnus if you step on one. The iron from nails is not in a form usable by plants.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: Elaine
Sarasota, Fl
The one constant in life is change
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dyzzypyxxy
Mar 17, 2017 3:06 PM CST
My experience is same as porkpal's - you should wait until the first ripe looking orange actually drops from the tree to harvest. They absolutely do look ripe a long time before they're sweet.

Philip, that's a dangerous notion, in my opinion. I'd be worried about stepping on a nail if they were scattered around like that. Iron oxide certainly will help to green up a tree that's iron deficient, and greener leaves make more sugar but it takes really deficient soil to make a citrus tree need that.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." โ€“Winston Churchill

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