Houseplants forum: Mother-In-Law's Tongue- needs help

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agroom
Mar 24, 2017 8:30 AM CST
What can I do to help this plant in my office? The leaves are wilting, and falling over.
Thumb of 2017-03-24/agroom/514c61

Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
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tarev
Mar 24, 2017 9:19 AM CST
Hello agroom, does that container have drainage holes?

agroom
Mar 24, 2017 9:51 AM CST
yes
Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
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tarev
Mar 24, 2017 11:05 AM CST
How often are you watering it? I see that thing happen when it gets overwatered.
Name: Lin
Florida (Zone 9b)

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plantladylin
Mar 24, 2017 6:26 PM CST
My first thought is that it's being over watered. Do you know if perhaps a few of your coworkers are watering the plant? Before I retired, the office lobby where I worked had lots of plants and people could not understand why the plants were dying. It was because a few employees would walk through and think that nobody else would remember to water the plants so they'd do it ... and the poor plants were drowning from too much attention.

I'd suggest re-potting your Snake Plant (Sansevieria trifasciata) into fresh soil and go light on the water regimen. Sansevieria are quite drought tolerant.
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Name: Gene Staver
Portage WI 53901 (Zone 5a)
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gasrocks
Mar 24, 2017 6:30 PM CST
At least dump it out of the pot and tell us about the present soil. Won't hurt the plant at all. They are very sturdy. Gene
Name: Will Creed
NYC
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WillC
Mar 25, 2017 8:56 AM CST
I hate to be the doomsayer here, but I have seen this many times. The roots have almost completely rotted and recovery is very unlikely. Pull upward on the leaves and you will find that they come right up because there are so few roots holding them. Repotting or replacing the soil will not save it.

Snake Plants have an undeserved reputation as hard-to-kill plants that do great in low light. They are often put in dim office locations. Indeed, they will survive for up to a couple of years, even with improper watering, before the plant rather suddenly starts to badly deteriorate. This is a plant that does not send out early warning stress signals. In low light, Snake Plants are extremely difficult NOT to over water. The soil has to become very dry and then only a very light watering should be applied - never a thorough watering. For low light, a ZZ Plant is a better option.

In good light close to a window, Snake Plants will thrive. They can be watered more heavily and they are known to literally burst the sides of their pots as they push out new growth.
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Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
Always count your blessings in life
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tarev
Mar 27, 2017 10:08 AM CST
Hello agroom, if it were mine, I will carefully uproot and inspect the root system. If there are still some good ones intact, then I will repot them separately in a very well draining media in a smaller container with drainage holes.

For those where the leaves have no good roots anymore, you can still try to chop the leaves into several pieces, and wait for them to grow roots. Just lay them down on soil and wait patiently. It will be long haul approach, but it may still try. Just depends on your overall conditions there. Ideally it has to be in a warm area with indirect light.

I don't give up easily on the succulents, have experienced something similar with one of my earlier snake plants, more because I used wrong container and left it outdoors in rain around Fall. I have underestimated the warm temperature requirement they prefer. I know these plants can take being flooded planted in ground for several months only if temperatures are really high like in the range of 80F to 90F. Anyways, just sharing that to you to share how resilient it can handle tough handling.

So if you have the energy and patience to follow through, inspect and separate the ones that are not doing good, repot separately in containers with drainage holes, and keep them in a warm, indirect light area. You may have to use smaller containers now, since it is in recovery phase and being rehabilitated indoors. Be very mindful of watering, indoors, it takes longer for the media to dry out.

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