Ask a Question forum: spring bulbs

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Name: Janice Coltharp
Springfield, Missouri
JanC37
Mar 24, 2017 8:27 PM CST
I know that spring bulbs are supposed to be planted in the fall. I have always done that. But, this year, I need to move some bulbs to another location. After the jonquils have finished blooming, can they be dug up for relocation? What is the proper technique for storing bulbs that are dug up now and kept for fall planting?
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Mar 24, 2017 8:42 PM CST
The problem with letting bulbs bloom and then digging them up for storage is that they don't have a chance to rejuvenate. The chances of them surviving go way down. If you have to move them, dig up enough soil with them that you can replant without them noticing they have a new location.
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Name: Ginny G
Central Iowa (Zone 5a)
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Legalily
Mar 24, 2017 8:56 PM CST
Daisy is correct. I have done this before and I dug up the ground around and moved it too.
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Name: Sally
central Maryland
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sallyg
Mar 24, 2017 9:40 PM CST
Right-o. Treat them like live plants and keep roots intact.
They often say six weeks after bloom is enough time for the leaves to renew the bulb. Longer is better. Anyway, keeping the foliage and roots in good shape as long as possible will help the bulb. If they are yellowing but you can still tell how deep they were planted, it is a nice depth guide for the new place. I like to move them in late spring like that, so I can still see where the clumps are.
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Name: Yardenman
Maryland (Zone 7a)
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Yardenman
Mar 24, 2017 11:04 PM CST
sallyg said:Right-o. Treat them like live plants and keep roots intact.
They often say six weeks after bloom is enough time for the leaves to renew the bulb. Longer is better. Anyway, keeping the foliage and roots in good shape as long as possible will help the bulb. If they are yellowing but you can still tell how deep they were planted, it is a nice depth guide for the new place. I like to move them in late spring like that, so I can still see where the clumps are.


I don't move bulbs often, but when I do, I wait to Summer and they don't much care then. One thing I have learned is do not water them after you move them. They really want to stay dormant.
Name: Janice Coltharp
Springfield, Missouri
JanC37
Apr 3, 2017 12:53 AM CST
Thanks to all who responded to my question about transplanting bulbs. Your advice is very helpful and I will heed your suggestions. Again, thanks for the help. Jan

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