Mid Atlantic Gardening forum: Pachysandra Question

Views: 660, Replies: 14 » Jump to the end
Name: Rick Moses
Derwood, MD (Zone 7b)
Hostas Ferns Garden Photography Plant and/or Seed Trader Forum moderator Region: United States of America
Region: Mid-Atlantic Region: Maryland Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Image
RickM
Mar 28, 2017 2:17 PM CST

Moderator

Our pachysandra is really leggy. There are some pieces that are 12" long with leaves only at the last few inches.

If I were to cut it off, say with the lawn mower, would it come back stronger?

We've had a problem over the years with the vinca trying to take over. I just cleared it from an area about 20 feet long by 4 feet wide. I ended up with a couple of trash bags full of the crap! (If anyone wants it, you'll need to either pick it up or meet me somewhere within the next several days.)

If only there was a way to kill the vinca without harming the pachysandra, etc.

Thoughts?
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
Region: United States of America Region: Kentucky Farmer Cat Lover Birds Bee Lover
Butterflies Enjoys or suffers hot summers Enjoys or suffers cold winters Dog Lover Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
Image
ViburnumValley
Mar 28, 2017 7:32 PM CST
Not that you'd want to hear it, but all those non-native evergreen groundcovers are crap.
John
Name: Susan
Vienna, VA (Zone 7a)
Birds Echinacea Composter Foliage Fan Hummingbirder Bee Lover
Butterflies Region: Mid-Atlantic Critters Allowed Cat Lover Native Plants and Wildflowers Dragonflies
Image
Muddy1
Mar 28, 2017 8:13 PM CST
Yes, you could mow the Pachysandra and it probably would look better eventually.
Personally, I would let the Vinca win. Japanese Pachysandra roots can become a solid mass that is 5" or more deep and, at that point, they're hogging all the water and nutrients, to the detriment of shrubs, trees, etc.
[Last edited by Muddy1 - Mar 28, 2017 8:14 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1400201 (3)
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
Region: United States of America Region: Kentucky Farmer Cat Lover Birds Bee Lover
Butterflies Enjoys or suffers hot summers Enjoys or suffers cold winters Dog Lover Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
Image
ViburnumValley
Mar 28, 2017 8:20 PM CST
And these non-native evergreen groundcovers contribute absolutely zero to native fauna - while performing to the detriment of the local flora community.
John
Name: Judy
Mid Atlantic Coastal Plain USA (Zone 7b)
Butterflies
MariposaMaid
Mar 29, 2017 6:29 AM CST
I'm loving my Allegheny Spurge our, native pacysandra.
http://www.louistheplantgeek.c...

It is also available from North Creek.
Name: Rick Moses
Derwood, MD (Zone 7b)
Hostas Ferns Garden Photography Plant and/or Seed Trader Forum moderator Region: United States of America
Region: Mid-Atlantic Region: Maryland Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Image
RickM
Mar 29, 2017 7:40 AM CST

Moderator

Ours is the native Pachysandra procumbens. It is veeeeery slow growing. It's coming in to bloom now, and when I'm in there ripping out the vinca, I need to watch for bees, etc.

The vinca, on the other hand, is a nightmare! It is so thick in places that it is choking out everything in its path, including my hosta. What I really would love to have is some sort of herbicide that would destroy, without mercy, the vinca and leave everything else alone. Alas, I doubt that such a thing exists.
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
Region: United States of America Region: Kentucky Farmer Cat Lover Birds Bee Lover
Butterflies Enjoys or suffers hot summers Enjoys or suffers cold winters Dog Lover Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge)
Image
ViburnumValley
Mar 29, 2017 11:31 AM CST
Vinca minor, Hedera helix, and Euonymus fortunei all behave as you've stated, Rick. A pox on their houses.

There are herbicides that vanquish - and unfortunately leave nothing else alone as well as generally sterilizing the area and affecting future plants by soil persistence.

John
Name: Rick Moses
Derwood, MD (Zone 7b)
Hostas Ferns Garden Photography Plant and/or Seed Trader Forum moderator Region: United States of America
Region: Mid-Atlantic Region: Maryland Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Image
RickM
Mar 29, 2017 2:02 PM CST

Moderator

I use Bayer Advanced Shrub killer in the back on things live poison ivy, Virginia Creeper, blackberry, etc. I have to be more careful these days though as my Celandine poppies are starting to spread. (I have a couple of small colonies now.) The undesirables such as blackberry and some 'flat' thin that gets little white flowers on like to hang around the poppies. I guess they figure they're safe there. They're learning the hard way! Rolling on the floor laughing Whistling
Name: Susan
Vienna, VA (Zone 7a)
Birds Echinacea Composter Foliage Fan Hummingbirder Bee Lover
Butterflies Region: Mid-Atlantic Critters Allowed Cat Lover Native Plants and Wildflowers Dragonflies
Image
Muddy1
Mar 29, 2017 8:17 PM CST
Rick, now that I know you have Pachysandra procumbens, I take back all of my recommendations! I don't know how it would react to being mowed. I have P. procumbens, but my plants are newish and I don't have any long pieces. If I were good at rooting things, I might try taking cuttings, rooting them and planting them to help fill in.
Name: David
Lucketts, Va (Zone 7a)
Native Plants and Wildflowers Birds Region: Virginia Herbs Cat Lover Bee Lover
Seed Starter Butterflies Winter Sowing Ferns Region: Mid-Atlantic Hellebores
Image
greenthumb99
Apr 25, 2017 9:08 PM CST
Rick - I just ran across this thread, but now, 4 weeks later, my Pachysandra procumbens is putting out a lot of new growth. It does indeed grow slowly, only doubling annually, and this expansion occurs mainly in the early spring. Your patch should look more promising now that when you started this thread. Don't think mowing would accomplish your goal, and cuttings are supposedly best taken for rooting in the fall.
Earth is a galactic insane asylum where the inmates have been left in charge.
Name: Judy
Mid Atlantic Coastal Plain USA (Zone 7b)
Butterflies
MariposaMaid
Apr 26, 2017 6:36 AM CST
I agree
Name: Ric Sanders
Dover, Pa. (Zone 6b)
And his children Are his flowers ..
Region: Pennsylvania Dog Lover Cottage Gardener Ponds Garden Art Seed Starter
Keeper of Poultry Vegetable Grower Butterflies Birds Greenhouse Garden Ideas: Master Level
Image
Eric4home
Apr 27, 2017 12:24 PM CST
The best way to expand quickly is root fresh cuttings now, and add them just outside the perimeter. Repeat as needed. Then take two Acetylsalicylic Acid and call me in the morning. Rolling on the floor laughing

We had a lady of some affluence want a bed of Pachysandra, I was her maintenance/gardener helper. tending the rose gardens under her watchful care among other things. I think I made $1.50/hr, but I carry on. We removed the turf,added compost, tilled, and planted 40-50 flats of 3" potted Pachysandra. We planted the pots about 6x6"s. The next year she had a beautiful display and probably paid more than I earned that year. I spent whole days removing spent rodie and
azalea blooms because they were distracting from her gardens. I will admit I learned a lot of gardening know-how from her. I learned more from my Grandmother, who cleaned her husband's Dr's office and recommended me for the job, and my Grandfather who was a subsistence farmer, lucky to work 2 days a week at the PA RR, during the depression.
Ric of MAF @ DG
Name: David
Lucketts, Va (Zone 7a)
Native Plants and Wildflowers Birds Region: Virginia Herbs Cat Lover Bee Lover
Seed Starter Butterflies Winter Sowing Ferns Region: Mid-Atlantic Hellebores
Image
greenthumb99
Apr 27, 2017 12:31 PM CST
Was that Pachysandra terminalis (Japanese Pachysandra) or P. procumbens (Allegheny Spurge). The native Pachysandra in more commonly available nowadays, but still hard to find, especially in quantity.
Earth is a galactic insane asylum where the inmates have been left in charge.
Name: Ric Sanders
Dover, Pa. (Zone 6b)
And his children Are his flowers ..
Region: Pennsylvania Dog Lover Cottage Gardener Ponds Garden Art Seed Starter
Keeper of Poultry Vegetable Grower Butterflies Birds Greenhouse Garden Ideas: Master Level
Image
Eric4home
Apr 27, 2017 1:44 PM CST
I'm sure back then, 1966-67-68 it was the Japanese variety. Smiling She also had English Ivy growing down the 4' limestone wall on a corner property that she wanted cleaned at the minimum of once a year. She had beautiful gardens, I could not appreciate all of it at the time. I did appreciate some of it, because it was just so grande.
I remember that they had an old tank on the wall toilet I was allowed to use in the basement. I would have loved having that in one of my houses.
Ric of MAF @ DG
Name: David
Lucketts, Va (Zone 7a)
Native Plants and Wildflowers Birds Region: Virginia Herbs Cat Lover Bee Lover
Seed Starter Butterflies Winter Sowing Ferns Region: Mid-Atlantic Hellebores
Image
greenthumb99
Apr 27, 2017 3:34 PM CST
As I suspected. In a later post in this thread RickM reveals that the plant he is concerned about is P. procumbens. Much to the dismay of those of us who grow it, it is not as easily propagated as Japanese Pachysandra.
Earth is a galactic insane asylum where the inmates have been left in charge.

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Mid Atlantic Gardening forum
Only the members of the Members group may reply to this thread.

Member Login:

Username:

Password:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by Fleur569 and is called "Neon Anyone?"