Cactus and Tender Succulents forum: Aloe hybrid "splitting"???

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Name: Steve Claggett
Portland Orygun (Zone 8a)
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madcratebuilder
Apr 4, 2017 11:34 AM CST
By splitting I mean a main stake "splitting off the main center of the plant. I've only been caring for Aloe hybrids for the past year. Several have produced "pups" that are easy to detach and grow as a new plant. This is the first time I have seen this. Is this common with Alow?

Aloe meyeri cv Doran Black

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Spectamur agendo
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
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Baja_Costero
Apr 4, 2017 12:20 PM CST

Moderator

Aloe mite. Very difficult to treat, extremely contagious, best disposed of in the trash. You never actually see the mite (without a microscope) but it causes weird disorganized growth (so-called "aloe cancer") which is usually a different color from the plant and "wrong looking" in a general kind of way. The most vulnerable part of the plant is actually the inflorescence, and I think the mite spreads very effectively that way by sprinkling itself into the wind.

To treat the aloe mite you need to start with surgery to remove all the affected areas (not looking like a great option with your plant, given the action is at the core) and then treat with a miticide if necessary. Mites are not insects and insect control products generally do not have any effect on them. The miticides are expensive and relatively hazardous, but there is no good short cut.

Here are a couple of advanced mite infestations of the flower and stem, so you know what the situation looks like when you let it go wildly out of control. I recommend taking action as soon as you see the weirdness manifest itself, and not waiting a day longer.



Some aloes seem to be extremely susceptible to the aloe mite. I have seen mite activity on Aloe striata, arborescens, nobilis, polyphylla, cameronii, barberae, Hercules, longistyla, humilis, spinosissima, maculata, and other plants I can't remember right now. For some reason some plants do not seem to get infested even though they're growing right next to one that's looking ugly.

I suspect some aloes may harbor the mite at some low level that does not cause aloe cancer. They're all over the place here and I have more or less given up on eradicating the mites from the garden, though I have zero tolerance and try to be very observant. Such a specialized pest can be persistent.
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Apr 4, 2017 8:24 PM (+)]
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Name: Steve Claggett
Portland Orygun (Zone 8a)
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madcratebuilder
Apr 4, 2017 12:30 PM CST
Do you think I could salvage the pup it has? I've isolated it outside for now.



ETA: I was hoping you did a April fools on me...nope, they are all of what you say. Plant is in the trash.
Spectamur agendo
[Last edited by madcratebuilder - Apr 4, 2017 12:46 PM (+)]
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Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
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Baja_Costero
Apr 4, 2017 12:43 PM CST

Moderator

You can try to save the offset. Keep it in quarantine afterwards, maybe? My experience has not been great with removing the mite-infested part of a plant and then trying to salvage the offsets or whatever. A good part of the time the mite comes back. Maybe there's some way you could sanitize the pup, otherwise the time frame for recurrence could be up to a year or more later. My Hercules cuttings (the mother plant was infested in the core, which I carefully removed) ended up all getting aloe cancer after several months. The main thing is just to be hyper-alert once you know a certain plant may have an issue, and nip any kind of weirdness you see in the bud.
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Apr 4, 2017 1:01 PM (+)]
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Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
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Baja_Costero
Apr 4, 2017 2:23 PM CST

Moderator

Oh, and thoroughly bleach the pot that plant was in before you reuse it for another plant.
Name: 'CareBear'

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Stush2019
Apr 9, 2017 1:52 PM CST
I have heard that 'Seven' was useful for helping to not spread the mite but not to stop it. Can't be sure of it. Best advise is to totally get rid of anything with that condition. First read this last year and scared the **** out of me.
I have a hybrid Haworthia showing weird center growth but no discolor. It is old stock and all other plants all around it are normal.

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This came from this same plant growing normal.


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Name: Steve Claggett
Portland Orygun (Zone 8a)
Beekeeper Cat Lover
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madcratebuilder
Apr 11, 2017 8:33 AM CST
When I read about the Aloe mite last week I was about to burn the greenhouse to the ground.

After reading more I'm not as worried. People are having good luck using a miticide combined with a systemic. Once the mite gets inside the leaf you are beat, best to destroy the plant. Some are saving infected plants but the are preeminently disfigured.

I'm worried about the seeds I just started, I have about 2 dozen assorted hybrids a quarter inch tall and I have visions of a mite army marching.
Spectamur agendo
Name: 'CareBear'

Sempervivums Hostas Dog Lover Irises Amaryllis Cactus and Succulents
Region: Pennsylvania
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Stush2019
Apr 12, 2017 1:52 PM CST
When I looked into that miticide, it was expensive. Most common systemic Imidacloprid is totally ineffective in killing mites. You need an acaricide to get the job done. Insecticide-acaricide (Streptomyces avermitilis).
Sevin (carbaryl) does look to be effective as a group 1A miticide against Eriophyids.
I don't think mites spread thru seeds. Only if plant is infected so as long as they were away from your infected plant, should be ok. Also look for any signs of infections.
Name: Thijs van Soest
Mesa, AZ (Zone 9b)
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mcvansoest
Apr 12, 2017 2:27 PM CST
For Agaves the best miticides are Avid and Forbid and those are incredibly expensive. I do not know how these would work for Aloe mite, which so far I have only encountered once in my collection (plant is not with me anymore), but both Aloe and Agave mite are part of the Eriophyid mite family so it should probably work for Aloes as well.

I ended up with two Agaves with Eriophyid mites and Avid cleared that up for me, both are now growing out of the disfigurement. Avid is a little more affordable than Forbid, so I ended up biting the bullet and getting some.

One trick to get it into the leaves better is to use some spreader sticker with your miticide mix.
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Bromeliad
Hummingbirder Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator
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Baja_Costero
Apr 12, 2017 6:27 PM CST

Moderator

Yeah I wouldn't be too concerned about the seedlings unless you collected the seeds from an infected inflorescence.

Stush, not sure what's up with your Haworthia, looks like maybe damage to the growth point and then it branched, but that would not explain why the markings are different. A virus maybe? Or nothing, I dunno. I would trash it if you're worried.

I have had 1 encounter with the agave mite. The plant is no more and I avoided that source thereafter. The agave mite seems less prevalent and persistent compared to the aloe mite in my garden (given a roughly equal number of targets).
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Apr 12, 2017 6:29 PM (+)]
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Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Bromeliad
Hummingbirder Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator
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Baja_Costero
Apr 15, 2017 1:06 PM CST

Moderator

Here's a case of the aloe mite I discovered recently on my travels... looks like marlothii or a hybrid.

The blistery dark part caught my eye at first but also check out the engorged red underside of the leaf, like a fat lip. Very abnormal, too.

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Name: Thijs van Soest
Mesa, AZ (Zone 9b)
Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Bee Lover Bookworm Adeniums Enjoys or suffers hot summers
Cactus and Succulents Container Gardener Hummingbirder Xeriscape Region: Arizona Region: Southwest Gardening
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mcvansoest
Apr 15, 2017 5:59 PM CST
A link to some Eriophyid mite facts and references:

http://www.agaveville.org/view...

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