Roses forum: Fertilizing

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roseman2145
Apr 12, 2017 7:50 AM CST
What type of fertilizer do you use in the spring right after pruning your roses; organic or chemical?
Seems like chemical would be faster acting and get the rose growing faster.
Minnesota (Zone 3b)
RpR
Apr 18, 2017 9:43 AM CST
Spring I use long term granulated.
I did/do use a vitamin B type liquid often in spring.
The soil is moist and get the fertilizer going faster.
I add quickie liquids in the summer during times of stress.
Sydney, Australia (Zone 10b)
Protoavis
Apr 18, 2017 5:04 PM CST
Rotting seaweed tea. I use various seaweeds as nutrient exports for my reef tank.
Anyone with oryzalin (aka Surflan, Embargo), am looking for a small amount rather than 5litres from manufacturer (min size in Australia....)
Name: Steve
Prescott, AZ (Zone 7b)
Region: Southwest Gardening Roses Irises Lilies
Image
Steve812
Apr 18, 2017 6:59 PM CST
I generally use Mills Magic because I like to feed the soil and pump up the rose plants rather gently. Of the two hundred roses I grow not 10% are hybrid tea roses, I don't do exhibitions, and I usually prune lightly unless there are special reasons to do otherwise. I also mulch the whole garden with two inches of bark & rotted manure each year. The few times I have given great shots of nitrogen I've ended up with powdery mildew problems.
When you dance with nature, try not to step on her toes.
Bordeaux
aureloiz
Apr 29, 2017 6:45 AM CST
The best fertilizers are organic pellets. They offer the best result. Smiling
Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
Composter Garden Photography Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Garden Ideas: Master Level Plant Identifier Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Region: Alabama
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Seedfork
Apr 29, 2017 1:02 PM CST
"Organic" is not an ingredient of fertilizer. So I am wondering what the ingredients are of the fertilizer you are recommending that gives the best result? I know my roses need a good boost right now because they look pretty pathic.
Name: Steve
Prescott, AZ (Zone 7b)
Region: Southwest Gardening Roses Irises Lilies
Image
Steve812
Apr 29, 2017 4:09 PM CST
There are two general approaches. One is to throw nutrients into poor soil, assuming correctly that some of them will get to the plant. This will often perk up a plant for a season or two. When I just want to zap the plants with good stuff I do one of two things: I buy a hundred pounds of Osmocote 15-15-15 slow release fertilizer and spread it around. I expect late April would be a good time to do this. Then, over the next 3-4 months the primary nutrients wash into the soil slowly and gently. Alternatively, I would buy Spray 'n' Grow along with the micronutrients, and spray the foliage every few weeks. These kinds of treatments do little to build up good soil; but they can help strengthen a stressed plant.

The downside is that the results are temporary at best. They can sometimes be counterproductive. Bear in mind that fertile soil is a result of lots of activity by single celled creatures breaking down old plant and animal matter. The waste products are the nutrients used by the plants as food. Throwing lots of these same waste products (chemical fertilizers) into the soil can kill the very microorganisms responsible for soil fertility. Fertilizing with harsh chemicals at high concentrations can kill your plants and the things in the soil that would keep them alive. Probably the fastest way to kill a newly planted bare root rose is to put chemical fertilizer into the hole with it. Too much fresh nitrogen will kill a rose before it gets started.

The alternative approach is to try and manage or improve soil fertility. This approach takes longer. The improvements are more gradual, but the results are more robust.

This will be the first year I have have not delivered an average of 1 lb of Mills Magic to each rose in my garden - mostly because I forgot. I'm pretty sure that most of the roses will sail through the season, though, because they have been mulched so generously with organic materials. In a few years those will burn off unless I keep replenishing them. I'll mulch with the same horse manure and wood bark mixture in late summer. And I'll order 200 lb of Mills Magic in February.

I have heard of serious rose growers mixing their own fertilizer cocktails with ingredients like Alfalfa Pellets (Nitrogen and Fiber), Bone Meal (Phosphorous and Calcium), Gypsum (Calcium and Sulfate), Wood Ash or Green Sand (Potassium), Coir (Fiber), Coffee grounds (Potassium) and Compost (all of the above but in undetermined quantities). And I've seen one can get great results doing this. It can be a lot cheaper than buying preformulated fertilizer; but it can also be a lot more work.

Gardens Alive has (or once had) a soil evaluation service where for a single price they would evaluate your soil and sell you a customized bag of soil ammendments/fertilizer for it. Seemed pricy to me but it may be an excellent way to start a new garden.
When you dance with nature, try not to step on her toes.
Name: Blue Girl
Los Angeles (Zone 9a)
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BlueGirl
May 25, 2017 10:22 PM CST
Rich compost, a little Super Thrive, liquid fish and kelp emulsion and a good watering works pretty good for me.
Name: Carol H. Sandt
Lancaster County, Pennsylvania (Zone 6b)
Peonies Butterflies Region: Mid-Atlantic Hibiscus Daylilies Xeriscape
Hostas Roses Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
csandt
May 26, 2017 6:46 AM CST
Steve812 said:There are two general approaches. One is to throw nutrients into poor soil, assuming correctly that some of them will get to the plant. This will often perk up a plant for a season or two. When I just want to zap the plants with good stuff I do one of two things: I buy a hundred pounds of Osmocote 15-15-15 slow release fertilizer and spread it around. I expect late April would be a good time to do this. Then, over the next 3-4 months the primary nutrients wash into the soil slowly and gently. Alternatively, I would buy Spray 'n' Grow along with the micronutrients, and spray the foliage every few weeks. These kinds of treatments do little to build up good soil; but they can help strengthen a stressed plant.

The downside is that the results are temporary at best. They can sometimes be counterproductive. Bear in mind that fertile soil is a result of lots of activity by single celled creatures breaking down old plant and animal matter. The waste products are the nutrients used by the plants as food. Throwing lots of these same waste products (chemical fertilizers) into the soil can kill the very microorganisms responsible for soil fertility. Fertilizing with harsh chemicals at high concentrations can kill your plants and the things in the soil that would keep them alive. Probably the fastest way to kill a newly planted bare root rose is to put chemical fertilizer into the hole with it. Too much fresh nitrogen will kill a rose before it gets started.

The alternative approach is to try and manage or improve soil fertility. This approach takes longer. The improvements are more gradual, but the results are more robust.

This will be the first year I have have not delivered an average of 1 lb of Mills Magic to each rose in my garden - mostly because I forgot. I'm pretty sure that most of the roses will sail through the season, though, because they have been mulched so generously with organic materials. In a few years those will burn off unless I keep replenishing them. I'll mulch with the same horse manure and wood bark mixture in late summer. And I'll order 200 lb of Mills Magic in February.

I have heard of serious rose growers mixing their own fertilizer cocktails with ingredients like Alfalfa Pellets (Nitrogen and Fiber), Bone Meal (Phosphorous and Calcium), Gypsum (Calcium and Sulfate), Wood Ash or Green Sand (Potassium), Coir (Fiber), Coffee grounds (Potassium) and Compost (all of the above but in undetermined quantities). And I've seen one can get great results doing this. It can be a lot cheaper than buying preformulated fertilizer; but it can also be a lot more work.

Gardens Alive has (or once had) a soil evaluation service where for a single price they would evaluate your soil and sell you a customized bag of soil ammendments/fertilizer for it. Seemed pricy to me but it may be an excellent way to start a new garden.


What is Mills Magic and where do you get it? Amazon doesn't list it.
Carol H. Sandt

“Once you stop learning, you start dying.” – Albert Einstein
Name: Suzanne/Sue
Sebastopol, CA (Zone 9a)
Sunset Zone 15
Plant Database Moderator Region: California Cottage Gardener Roses Irises Clematis
Garden Photography Keeper of Poultry Hummingbirder Bee Lover Butterflies Houseplants
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Calif_Sue
May 26, 2017 8:40 AM CST

Moderator

Googling is a verb! nodding Lots of sites came up with a few reviews, forum discussions and also home made recipes but here is the main site.
https://www.millsmix.com/ferti...
My gardening Blog!
Hand sewn wares and vintage finds in my Etsy store. Summer Song Cottage
Minnesota (Zone 3b)
RpR
May 26, 2017 2:08 PM CST
I am amazed at how many go to Amazon. If it come up in a search I may use it but I never go straight there.

Often I do deep searches on several search engines as the ones up front often pay to be there where as some with unknown or hard to find products may be back on page sixteen.
Long Island, NY (Zone 6b)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Celebrating Gardening: 2015
MargieNY
May 26, 2017 2:37 PM CST
Carol,
https://www.millsmix.com/ferti...

http://rosemania.com/page6.htm...

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