Houseplants forum: Do you quarantine new plants when you first bring them home?

Views: 908, Replies: 19 » Jump to the end
Name: Alyssa Blue
Ohio (Zone 5b)
Bloom where you're planted
Garden Art Dragonflies Houseplants Birds Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Hummingbirder
Orchids Plant Identifier
Image
AlyssaBlue
Apr 13, 2017 8:04 AM CST
Every spring I pick up a bunch of little plants, and "raise them" from cuttings or 4" pots. Now that I have over 40 house plants, it makes it harder to quarantine because the current plants get pushed together in one room. I was just curious if any of you do the quarantine, and for how long? I think last year I waited a month, but does that seem a little over the top?
Georgia (Zone 8a)
Region: Georgia Enjoys or suffers hot summers Dog Lover Houseplants Cactus and Succulents Annuals
Foliage Fan Birds Critters Allowed Hummingbirder Butterflies Bee Lover
Image
Hamwild
Apr 13, 2017 9:11 AM CST
I ought to, but I can't say I do. My Mother bought me a cactus a few years back that ended up having scale and I lost everything. Crying It looked fine, I didn't see any adult scale when I inspected it, but within 2 weeks, everyone was covered.
Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
Always count your blessings in life
Cat Lover Houseplants Plays in the sandbox Region: California Orchids Plant Lover: Loves 'em all!
Composter Cactus and Succulents Dragonflies Hummingbirder Amaryllis Container Gardener
Image
tarev
Apr 13, 2017 10:12 AM CST
Yes, I quarantine them, about a week. Better to be safe than sorry. Also lets the plant acclimate slowly to my area.
Name: Carter Mayer
Houston, TX (Zone 9b)
Tropicals Adeniums Plant Identifier
Image
Carter
Apr 13, 2017 1:27 PM CST
Well, not really. I should, but I don't. All of my plants kind of live by "only the toughest survive", so new ones just get thrown into the mix. Believe it or not, I kill fewer of them that way! Sometimes they may sit there for several days to a week before I can get to them, but I don't intentionally quarantine them.
Name: Kristi
east Texas pineywoods (Zone 8a)
Winter Sowing Cat Lover Dog Lover Vermiculture Birds Bulbs
Canning and food preservation Butterflies Composter Bromeliad Bookworm Greenhouse
Image
pod
Apr 13, 2017 3:05 PM CST
I don't put the new plants in the plant slammer here either. I haven't had any problems yet although I feel slightly guilty when I bring new ones home and add them to the collection without quarantine.
Be content moving inch by inch because, by days end, the inches, will add up to feet and yards.

Fulfilling ambitious objectives is usually done one step at a time.
Name: Bev
Salem OR (Zone 8a)
Sempervivums Container Gardener Foliage Fan Garden Ideas: Master Level Photo Contest Winner: 2014
Image
webesemps
Apr 13, 2017 3:14 PM CST
I try to at least look more closely (being at home and having more time and better lighting) at the plants since most that I buy are from outside and when they get home, it's a little warmer and sometimes the bugs (aphids and gnats) are more visible and mobile for me to see. I at least put them away from my other plants for a few days.
Name: Alyssa Blue
Ohio (Zone 5b)
Bloom where you're planted
Garden Art Dragonflies Houseplants Birds Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Hummingbirder
Orchids Plant Identifier
Image
AlyssaBlue
Apr 13, 2017 4:49 PM CST
OK, so I may be a little OCD about it....I never thought of it as a plant slammer, Rolling on the floor laughing I started the quarantine idea after a horrible infestation of fungus gnats a few years ago, and I hadn't found the Mosquito Bits at that point, so we had them EVERYWHERE. But it's so much fun seeing the new plants I'm thinking of breaking them out early and I'll use Carter's idea of survival of the fittest. Hamwild, that's a bummer about the scale. Hope you found some neat plants after that!

Name: Kristi
east Texas pineywoods (Zone 8a)
Winter Sowing Cat Lover Dog Lover Vermiculture Birds Bulbs
Canning and food preservation Butterflies Composter Bromeliad Bookworm Greenhouse
Image
pod
Apr 13, 2017 9:02 PM CST
Alyssa ~ please tell me how you use the Mosquito Bits for fungus gnats? I use it all summer for mosquitos but want to be prepared if I run into fungus gnats. I'm all ears!
Be content moving inch by inch because, by days end, the inches, will add up to feet and yards.

Fulfilling ambitious objectives is usually done one step at a time.
Name: Ed
Central ,NJ (Zone 6b)
Cactus and Succulents Container Gardener Sempervivums Houseplants Garden Ideas: Level 1
Image
herrwood
Apr 14, 2017 8:22 AM CST
New plants usually go in my garage for a week or so before I bring them in the house.
I like to work on my cars in comfort so the garage has heat and a/c.
Plants are like that little ray of sunshine on a rainy day.
Name: Alyssa Blue
Ohio (Zone 5b)
Bloom where you're planted
Garden Art Dragonflies Houseplants Birds Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Hummingbirder
Orchids Plant Identifier
Image
AlyssaBlue
Apr 14, 2017 9:35 AM CST
Kristi- When I had the fungus gnat problem, I actually called the company that makes Mosquito Dunkers and they said Mosquito Bits were more for house plants. I think the reason for the Bits, is that it's not quite as strong a forumulation as the Dunkers, and since it's indoors...

So I sprinkle the top of the soil with the Mosquito Bits and take a toothpick and lightly make sure it's tamped into the soil a little. Then water. One thing I've noticed is that a little bit of white mold forms on the top in the beginning, then watering makes it go away. I don't worry at all about that. But you can see a little patch of white on the plant's soil on the right. Also, you may need to apply the Bits twice if the plant was really infested and the eggs hatch later on.

Here is a photo of my two new ficus. The one on the left actually had the juvenile form of the gnats (the bugs could crawl in soil but did not have wings yet). I know this because I always put a slice of potato on the top of the soil of new plants for about 4 hours. The gnats, and other soil bugs, will be attracted to the potato and you can see them when you lift up the slice and use a flashlight and magnifying glass. Works every time!

Thumb of 2017-04-14/AlyssaBlue/72f561

Name: Carter Mayer
Houston, TX (Zone 9b)
Tropicals Adeniums Plant Identifier
Image
Carter
Apr 14, 2017 9:43 AM CST
@AlyssaBlue, who's the photobomber in the center?
Name: Liz Shaw
Gilbert, AZ (Sunset Zone 13) (Zone 9a)
Arizona Gardener
Enjoys or suffers hot summers Region: Southwest Gardening Region: Arizona Ponds Aquaponics Hydroponics
Herbs Container Gardener Vegetable Grower Gardens in Buckets Cactus and Succulents Miniature Gardening
Image
LizDTM
Apr 14, 2017 10:22 AM CST
AlyssaBlue, do you buy the dunks and break them up? I definitely want to try this.
And the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom. -Anaïs Nin
Georgia (Zone 8a)
Region: Georgia Enjoys or suffers hot summers Dog Lover Houseplants Cactus and Succulents Annuals
Foliage Fan Birds Critters Allowed Hummingbirder Butterflies Bee Lover
Image
Hamwild
Apr 14, 2017 10:41 AM CST
I have read ti dissolve about 1/4 of a dunk in a gallon of water and the next time you water, use that instead. I don't speak from experience though.
Name: Alyssa Blue
Ohio (Zone 5b)
Bloom where you're planted
Garden Art Dragonflies Houseplants Birds Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Hummingbirder
Orchids Plant Identifier
Image
AlyssaBlue
Apr 14, 2017 11:38 AM CST
Yes, that is true about the dunkers, you can use them also as Hamwild suggested. The problem I found with that, is the dunkers have styrofoam (or something similar) in the dunks to make them float. So after the rest of the dunker mixed with water, I was left with little tiny pieces of styrofoam in the container. I didn't spend time trying to filter it, but I'm sure someone here could figure that out!

Ha ha- good eye Carter! That my pachira aquatica that is down to one stem after traveling from AZ with me in 2015. I'll post a photo in a bit. It has struggled, but now loves it in the upstairs window!
Name: Alyssa Blue
Ohio (Zone 5b)
Bloom where you're planted
Garden Art Dragonflies Houseplants Birds Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Hummingbirder
Orchids Plant Identifier
Image
AlyssaBlue
Apr 14, 2017 5:51 PM CST
Here is the brave little money tree. It keeps going so I keep tending to it. I think the biggest shock it had was not being watered for 3 months when we had to leave our place in AZ to travel unexpectedly. And then I was shocked when we returned because I couldn't believe it was alive (it was in a glazed ceramic pot at that time). Then not long after, we moved across country during a snowstorm in AZ, a cold night in NM, then just generally being the whole change from the the trip. It has finally grown roots deep enough where I think it will make it. Talk about the will to live.

Thumb of 2017-04-14/AlyssaBlue/33f001

Name: Kristi
east Texas pineywoods (Zone 8a)
Winter Sowing Cat Lover Dog Lover Vermiculture Birds Bulbs
Canning and food preservation Butterflies Composter Bromeliad Bookworm Greenhouse
Image
pod
Apr 14, 2017 8:47 PM CST
Alyssa ~ thank you for sharing that valuable information! I have 'starred' your post for possible future reference. I appreciate your taking the time to share your knowledge & experience. Thank You!
Liz ~ I suspect you have found the Mosquito Bits by now. http://www.summitchemical.com/...
To me they are far easier to use than breaking up the dunks and more economical too.

I don't think they use styro in them as after a day in the dog water pail or the bird bath, the bits sink to the bottom. Styro wouldn't absorb water like that. According to their site, it is corn cob. Adding that while I think about it, even the dunks would sink to the bottom of the rain barrels after a while.

Carter ~ LOL on the photobomb. I looked so hard and couldn't see what you noticed. Whistling
Be content moving inch by inch because, by days end, the inches, will add up to feet and yards.

Fulfilling ambitious objectives is usually done one step at a time.
[Last edited by pod - Apr 15, 2017 5:41 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1415058 (16)
Name: Liz Shaw
Gilbert, AZ (Sunset Zone 13) (Zone 9a)
Arizona Gardener
Enjoys or suffers hot summers Region: Southwest Gardening Region: Arizona Ponds Aquaponics Hydroponics
Herbs Container Gardener Vegetable Grower Gardens in Buckets Cactus and Succulents Miniature Gardening
Image
LizDTM
Apr 14, 2017 10:37 PM CST
Thanks Kristi. I had not found the mosquito bits yet because I stepped away from the computer. So thanks for the link. Awesome!
And the day came when the risk to remain tight in a bud was more painful than the risk it took to blossom. -Anaïs Nin
Name: Kristi
east Texas pineywoods (Zone 8a)
Winter Sowing Cat Lover Dog Lover Vermiculture Birds Bulbs
Canning and food preservation Butterflies Composter Bromeliad Bookworm Greenhouse
Image
pod
Apr 15, 2017 5:39 AM CST
Liz ~ it may be different in your area but I found mine at the Lowes or Home Depot garden center. Have also seen them in Walmart too. Thumbs up
Be content moving inch by inch because, by days end, the inches, will add up to feet and yards.

Fulfilling ambitious objectives is usually done one step at a time.
Name: Alyssa Blue
Ohio (Zone 5b)
Bloom where you're planted
Garden Art Dragonflies Houseplants Birds Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Hummingbirder
Orchids Plant Identifier
Image
AlyssaBlue
Apr 15, 2017 7:48 AM CST
Kristi- I had guessed about what made it float, so that's good to know about the corn cobs! I can tell you that when I used the Dunks it only took one time of watering to resolve the gnats. With the Bits it may be two times. It was the ease of use that made me change to the Bits.

I'm glad this is helping, because before I had found this resolution, I tried hydrogen peroxide, the apple cider vinegar traps, sticky tapes, etc. None of it truly worked and every day those darn gnats were there- and eventually they moved to the sink drains. And you can't easily catch them because they are nimble. Oh my gosh- it was only when we were gone for 3 months that the gnats were gone. I learned about the Dunks after we had moved, and it's been such a joy to have plants and not worry about that any more. Now when I go into a store to look at plants, and a gnat flies in my face, I just laugh it off...... nodding
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
Image
WillC
Jun 1, 2017 5:01 PM CST
If you are acquiring decent quality plants and you inspect them carefully before purchase, then routine quarantine should not be necessary. Of course, continued monitoring of all your plants should be routine. If a single plant is discovered to have pests, then starting treatment right away should prevent the spread of the critters without quarantining.

Fungus gnats are the most visible and annoying of all plant pests. They are always a sign of non-sterile, infested potting mix that is being kept too moist. The most common source of fungus gnats is repotting using bagged potting mixes, such as Miracle -Gro. If you avoid repotting, you will often avoid fungus gnats. If repotting is really warranted, make your own mix of peat moss and perlite. Always be sure to allow your potting mix to dry out sufficiently between watering to deter fungus gnats and also prevent root rot.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Houseplants forum
You must first create a username and login before you can reply to this thread.

Member Login:

Username:

Password:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by dirtdorphins and is called "fivelips"