Native Habitats forum: Ladybug, Ladybug, Come On Home!

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Name: Abbey
Eastern New York State (Zone 6a)
Bookworm Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Garden Photography Garden Art Birds Region: New York
Herbs Container Gardener Annuals Dog Lover Butterflies Plant Lover: Loves 'em all!
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Garden10
Apr 17, 2017 11:46 AM CST
I mentioned in another thread somewhere about how I had only seen one ladybug since I moved here, and knew that people bought them for their yards, but research leading up to that said the types sold are invasive and aren't native to the places where they are being sold. So I did a little more research for New York State, and found The Ladybug Project, which sold larvae last year for C. novemnotata, the NYS ladybug that has nine dots on it that's highly threatened. They're affiliated with Cornell. So although I have the scars and bruises that disputes, it doesn't hurt to ask, I emailed and said, any chance of doing the same thing in 2017, I wasn't here in 2016? A few days later I received an email saying they are going to do it in 2017, but they have to tweak how they're doing it. Their reasons were a little cryptic, but as best as I can figure, it probably messes with their tax exempt status, so they have to start an independent non-profit business to sell the larvae, to expand the reintroduction to neighboring states as well.

But it won't stop there. They say this business will expand in the future to include other parts of North America and "other dwindling species of ladybugs." I thought that was very good news, and wanted to share -- also hoping this thread will be one more place that comes up on a Google search so no one makes the mistake I almost made by buying the wrong ladybugs from the wrong people. Smiling

"Every now and then I leave the book on the seat and go and have a refreshing potter among my flower beds from which I return greatly benefited, and with a more just conception of what is worth bothering about, and what is not." The Solitary Summer -- Elizabeth von Arnim
Name: Deb
Pacific NW (Zone 8b)
Region: Pacific Northwest Deer Organic Gardener Ferns Herbs Beavers
Dragonflies Spiders! Dog Lover Keeper of Poultry Birds Fruit Growers
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Bonehead
Apr 17, 2017 12:35 PM CST
Good idea to check the type of ladybug before buying. I am inundated with non-native ladybugs that over-winter in my house, and die off in masses in the early spring. My local nursery told me that 'our' native ladybugs winter in the mountains and most likely all the dead ones I am vacuuming up are not natives. I've never purchased ladybugs myself, so these must be from others around me.
I want to live in a world where the chicken can cross the road without its motives being questioned.
Name: Abbey
Eastern New York State (Zone 6a)
Bookworm Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Garden Photography Garden Art Birds Region: New York
Herbs Container Gardener Annuals Dog Lover Butterflies Plant Lover: Loves 'em all!
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Garden10
Apr 17, 2017 12:58 PM CST
Well, I thought I made it pretty clear in my post, but now that I can post links, try this on for size:

http://www.newsday.com/news/re...

"Every now and then I leave the book on the seat and go and have a refreshing potter among my flower beds from which I return greatly benefited, and with a more just conception of what is worth bothering about, and what is not." The Solitary Summer -- Elizabeth von Arnim
Name: Deb
Pacific NW (Zone 8b)
Region: Pacific Northwest Deer Organic Gardener Ferns Herbs Beavers
Dragonflies Spiders! Dog Lover Keeper of Poultry Birds Fruit Growers
Image
Bonehead
Apr 17, 2017 1:08 PM CST
Apparently the ladybug native to my area (PNW) has no spots. I usually see spotted ladybugs and will keep my eye out for the true natives.

http://www.realgardensgrownati...
I want to live in a world where the chicken can cross the road without its motives being questioned.
Name: Abbey
Eastern New York State (Zone 6a)
Bookworm Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Garden Photography Garden Art Birds Region: New York
Herbs Container Gardener Annuals Dog Lover Butterflies Plant Lover: Loves 'em all!
Image
Garden10
May 7, 2017 8:05 PM CST
Well, they finally decided on a name for the "business" -- here's the email:

Lost Ladybug Rescue

We hope you like this name and we are so sorry it has taken us so long to make this announcement!

We enjoyed thinking about all the wonderful business name suggestions you generously sent in. But somehow Lost Ladybug Rescue - no doubt inspired by your suggestions and enthusiasm - was the one that stuck. It's easy. It engages people's wish to help - which many of you also pointed out.

Thank you all SO VERY MUCH! We will write again as soon as the new website is up. The colony is slowly growing again and we will keep you posted about when we expect to begin shipping in 2017.

Happy Spring!

Dr. Rebecca Rice Smyth
Lost Ladybug Project
Insectary Building
Cornell University
Ithaca, NY 14853
www.lostladybug.org

I'm really looking forward to this, I've seen all sorts of things, and been bitten by them, too, but not one ladybug.





"Every now and then I leave the book on the seat and go and have a refreshing potter among my flower beds from which I return greatly benefited, and with a more just conception of what is worth bothering about, and what is not." The Solitary Summer -- Elizabeth von Arnim
Minnesota (Zone 3b)
RpR
Nov 30, 2017 5:34 PM CST
When I was a boy, pre-teen , long ago, I opened up a upstairs window in the spring in my grandparents farm house.
This was in a service stair-way and there fore rarely opened. I found it full of hibernating Lady Bugs and this was long before the invasive Lady Bug paranoia hit.
All lady bugs are beneficial, all bite and this year I had a lot again.
They do a real number on Colorado Potato Bugs.
Here in my part of Minn. there are a myriad of types and I do not know which are supposed to be here.
I bought larvae some years ago and read the instructions on where to put them so more stick around.
Don't now how many did but I have a few doing that now.
Name: Deb
Pacific NW (Zone 8b)
Region: Pacific Northwest Deer Organic Gardener Ferns Herbs Beavers
Dragonflies Spiders! Dog Lover Keeper of Poultry Birds Fruit Growers
Image
Bonehead
Nov 30, 2017 9:12 PM CST
I'm in the Pacific NW. I have never 'planted' ladybugs but for the past several years I've been getting an inordinate number of lady bugs wintering over inside the house. Many of them die before or shortly after they do whatever they do over the winter. I spoke with a local nursery who told me our native ladybugs typically winter in higher elevations, then come down when they wake up. I don't know much about bugs. My guess is the inside over-wintering ones are not natives, but I don't know if they threaten my actual natives. I do end up vacuuming up a lot of corpses every spring.

Do they bite humans? Any reaction? I've never heard of that, but I'm not much of a bug magnet.
I want to live in a world where the chicken can cross the road without its motives being questioned.
Minnesota (Zone 3b)
RpR
Dec 6, 2017 1:49 PM CST
They literally bite, i.e. pinch your skin.
Not sure why but I learned when I was a little boy not to let them get under your T-shirt, if they cannot keep on motoring about , they bite.
Just annoying that is all.

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