Plant ID forum: Dying Shrubberies?

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TexUs
Apr 21, 2017 2:30 PM CST
I'm not sure what these are but they started looking sickly last year.

I had a local greenhouse suggest to cut them back a third and fertilize, which I did, and it doesn't look much better.

What are these, and should I cut my losses and pull them all out???
Thumb of 2017-04-21/TexUs/09ffa7


Thumb of 2017-04-21/TexUs/51ca43

Name: Suzanne/Sue
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Calif_Sue
Apr 22, 2017 11:23 PM CST

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Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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sooby
Apr 23, 2017 6:31 AM CST
I'm not sure what they are, but plants can get very dry under roof overhangs, and being next to a brick wall would increase the heat and need for water. If the soil is dry, fertilizing could make it worse. Do they get irrigated at all? I assume you are in Texas?
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
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porkpal
Apr 23, 2017 6:59 AM CST
I think it is Photinia which, in my experience, seems to do poorly planted against a wall. I am not sure you want anything with a significant root system growing that close to your house.
Porkpal
Name: Lin
Florida Zone 9b, 10a

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plantladylin
Apr 23, 2017 9:10 AM CST
My first thought was also a variety of Photinia; possibly Red-Tipped Photinia (Photinia 'Fraseri') which is susceptible to black spot/fungal disease.

Photinia x fraseri is listed as an invasive plant in Texas:
http://www.texasinvasives.org/...
https://www.austintexas.gov/si...
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TexUs
Apr 23, 2017 11:13 AM CST
When we moved in 4 years ago it was healthy. Gone downhill ever since, and part of me thinks it might be too much irrigation because of the lawn (we had a well etc hooked up to irrigate).

If this root system is a problem to the foundation it's all the reason I would need to pull them out. We have some smaller (2 ft) plants that looks similar elsewhere along the house (separated from the yard so more well drained) that are doing well.

Should I pull them out only because of the root system, or are they worth trying to save, or are they dead regardless?
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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sooby
Apr 23, 2017 11:20 AM CST
How much/often did you irrigate the lawn? It looks rather patchy close to the shrubs.

TexUs
Apr 23, 2017 6:12 PM CST
It's still coming out of winter, usually is 45 min two or three times a week. Its very dry climate here. Great for the grass but maybe not the shrubs.
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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sooby
Apr 23, 2017 6:35 PM CST
If it is Photinia, then the spots on the leaves in your picture resembles Photinia leaf spot, see these pics:

https://www.google.ca/search?q...

Name: Carter Mayer
Houston, TX (Zone 9b)
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Carter
Apr 24, 2017 1:12 PM CST
I agree that it looks like photinia. 45 minutes irrigation 2-3 times per week isn't nearly enough to be too much irrigation in a hot, dry Texas climate. During the summer they would need that much everyday just to keep up. Just a guess, I would imagine the opposite is the issue - too dry.

I also agree that they appear to have a fungal issue. Due to that and compounded with whatever other issues they have, they are on death's door. I'd recommend yanking them out and starting fresh with something more suitable to that specific location.

Name: Tiffany purpleinopp
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purpleinopp
Apr 24, 2017 1:19 PM CST
If for no other reason than eliminating the silly task of mangling plants that are way too big for their location, I would remove them. Life's too short to insist that a 15+-foot entity remain 3-4 feet tall, and to spend valuable weekends manifesting that insistence.
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[Last edited by purpleinopp - Apr 24, 2017 1:19 PM (+)]
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TexUs
Apr 24, 2017 4:53 PM CST
Thanks all. Looks exactly like those pics. Any suggestions on replacement?

I want to avoid having a wood chipped bed (termites). Was hoping lava rock with some tall grasses or something?

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