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Purple1010
Apr 22, 2017 3:04 AM CST
Hi

New to the forum and looking for some advice.

We have just taken down our garden shed. This was on the raised patio area which you can see on the left side of the photograph.

We are now looking to turf that area, along with the first two rows of slabs to make a straight line. You can see that the grass are is slightly raised, maybe by around a foot, so we will have to make a slope to blend it in. Not worried about it all being completely level, just need to get rid of the drop so that it's safe for our toddler to tun around.

We do not really have much of a budget for this so we were thinking of doing it ourselves. However, we do not usually do any gardening so wondering if it's a simple enough job for us to do? Or should we cut our losses and pay someone to do it?

Any ideas on approximate price which a Gardner would charge for this?

Thanks
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Name: Sandy B.
Ford River, Michigan UP (Zone 4b)
(Zone 4b-maybe 5a)
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Weedwhacker
Apr 22, 2017 7:36 AM CST
Welcome to NGA, @Purple1010 .

I think you could tackle that project yourselves without too much of a problem. You'll probably want to cut the existing turf back a little ways so you can get a more gradual slope, and I'd suggest buying some sod to fill in the bare area left from that and where you remove the pavers, rather than using grass seed (which I know you didn't ask about, LOL). The sod shouldn't cost much for an area that size and the "instant gratification" will be well worth it, in my opinion. Smiling
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Name: Tiffany purpleinopp
Opp, AL ๐ŸŒต๐ŸŒทโš˜๐ŸŒน๐ŸŒป (Zone 8b)
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purpleinopp
Apr 28, 2017 4:39 PM CST
Agreed, and would also add a thin layer (probably about an inch but really can't see clearly enough to gauge from this distance) of compost before laying the sod because the ground looks very compacted and the sod would have an unnecessarily difficult time taking root there. Lack of exposure to oxygen for such a long time has probably created a void in microbial activity, and thus fertility, in that area, which would also be somewhat ameliorated by a new layer of compost.

Sod is usually delivered & laid for you, so not really a thing with a "DIY" option, but the layer of compost could be. Measure the area, decide the depth you want to add, do a little math involving PI, & buy the appropriate number of bags to fill that volume, which might involve more advance math if sold only by weight. But there is no such thing as too much or left-over compost, if you have or want any non-mowed area AKA "flower bed."
๐Ÿ‘€๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿ˜‚ - SMILE! -โ˜บ๐Ÿ˜Žโ˜ปโ˜ฎ๐Ÿ‘ŒโœŒโˆžโ˜ฏ๐Ÿฃ๐Ÿฆ๐Ÿ”๐Ÿ๐Ÿฏ๐Ÿพ
The less I interfere, the more balance mother nature provides.
๐Ÿ‘’๐ŸŽ„๐Ÿ‘ฃ๐Ÿก๐Ÿƒ๐Ÿ‚๐ŸŒพ๐ŸŒฟ๐Ÿโฆโง ๐Ÿƒ๐Ÿ๐Ÿ‚๐ŸŒพ๐ŸŒป๐ŸŒธ๐ŸŒผ๐ŸŒน๐ŸŒฝโ€โ˜€๐ŸŒบ
โ˜•๐Ÿ‘“ The only way to succeed is to try.
[Last edited by purpleinopp - Apr 28, 2017 4:47 PM (+)]
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Name: Carter Mayer
Houston, TX (Zone 9b)
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Carter
May 2, 2017 1:49 PM CST
Many nurseries & big box type stores sell sod. It's sold in slabs (like a thick shag rug) cut into manageable sections., maybe 1ft by 2ft -ish (guessing). This looks like a fairly small area, so I wouldn't expect it to cost too much. I agree with the adding of a layer of compost or topsoil before laying the sod, though, for the same reasons mentioned.
Name: Tiffany purpleinopp
Opp, AL ๐ŸŒต๐ŸŒทโš˜๐ŸŒน๐ŸŒป (Zone 8b)
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purpleinopp
May 2, 2017 5:00 PM CST
Fascinating, I had no idea, TY for fixing what I assumed & said. I guess I could have walked right by sod-for-sale & it would never register in my consciousness. My life needs less grass to mow, not more. ;)
๐Ÿ‘€๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿ˜‚ - SMILE! -โ˜บ๐Ÿ˜Žโ˜ปโ˜ฎ๐Ÿ‘ŒโœŒโˆžโ˜ฏ๐Ÿฃ๐Ÿฆ๐Ÿ”๐Ÿ๐Ÿฏ๐Ÿพ
The less I interfere, the more balance mother nature provides.
๐Ÿ‘’๐ŸŽ„๐Ÿ‘ฃ๐Ÿก๐Ÿƒ๐Ÿ‚๐ŸŒพ๐ŸŒฟ๐Ÿโฆโง ๐Ÿƒ๐Ÿ๐Ÿ‚๐ŸŒพ๐ŸŒป๐ŸŒธ๐ŸŒผ๐ŸŒน๐ŸŒฝโ€โ˜€๐ŸŒบ
โ˜•๐Ÿ‘“ The only way to succeed is to try.
Name: Carter Mayer
Houston, TX (Zone 9b)
Tropicals Adeniums Plant Identifier
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Carter
May 3, 2017 11:15 AM CST
You're welcome! Sometimes I've seen it right out front, but often you just have to go ask an employee. I know Home Depot and Lowe's carry it most of the year (at least in my area).
Minnesota (Zone 3b)
RpR
May 5, 2017 2:28 PM CST
Do not know where you are located but up North you will only find sod in rolls. Be careful you get thick good sod as some places it is paper thin on poor soil and will collapse in your hands.
If you spend some money, you can rent a powered sod cutter and A: use it to break up the packed soil by setting it at two inches and it will cut down that low leaving looser soil, B: they can be set to cut at an angle and you could use to cut along the sod edge at first with a steep angel till you have cut it back to where you wish it to end setting the blade at a shallower angle the last two to three cuts giving you a beveled edge but you will have to remove all the soil that the multiple cuts make probably spreading it over the low area..
If you do that first cut-off any sod that will be destroyed or you will be dealing with grass chunks.
The sod, if good can be rolled up and reused, if not good layed face down and put soil on top of it.

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