Daylilies forum: Quick question re seedlings

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Name: Deb
Pacific NW (Zone 8b)
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Bonehead
Apr 22, 2017 9:01 AM CST
OK all you daylily afficionados: While spring cleaning my garden beds, I note that most daylilies slowly (or quickly) increase by sending up new shoots around the perimeter of the base clump. I'm also noticing that single shoots will often appear about 6-8" away from the main clump. Are these seedlings? Which may or may not come true?
I want to live in a world where the chicken can cross the road without its motives being questioned.
Name: Fred Manning
Lillian Alabama

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spunky1
Apr 22, 2017 9:54 AM CST
If they are attached to the main plant they are the same daylily, if not they could be from seed that dropped from the main plant and will be seedlings. I know the old orange ditch lilies can travel several feet from the main plant before coming up.
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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sooby
Apr 22, 2017 10:26 AM CST
If they are small and look like grass when you first notice them they could be seedlings. I don't find daylilies self-seed very much, where I am at least. If it looks like a fairly normal sized fan then it is probably a rhizomatous cultivar. If you dig down you should find the rhizome likely still attached to Mom as Fred suggested.
Name: Larry
Enterprise, Al. 36330 (Zone 8b)
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Seedfork
Apr 22, 2017 10:51 AM CST
Too, if rhizomatous daylilies have been in that bed in the past and were removed, then it could be from the rhizomes left behind. So it would not be attached to a plant but would not be a seedling either.
Name: Deb
Pacific NW (Zone 8b)
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Bonehead
Apr 22, 2017 11:18 AM CST
Thanks for the explanations, I knew I came to the right people. These offshoots seem to be primarily from a no-name daylily that is a strong grower so I will assume these strays are from the root and just dig them up and replant somewhere. I got a start from my sister, who bought it as Victoria Red (not in our database) and I've renamed it to Rusty Dupuis in my garden (in memory of a coworker). I do realize Rusty Dupuis is a 'real' named cultivar but this one fits the bill for me and I'm neither a collector nor breeder. I'll just keep spreading him around my yard.
I want to live in a world where the chicken can cross the road without its motives being questioned.
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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sooby
Apr 22, 2017 11:50 AM CST
There is a daylily cultivar called 'Victoria' that is red. Could that be it? Maybe the "red" was descriptive rather than part of the name.
Name: Marilyn, aka "Poly"
South San Francisco Bay Area (Zone 9b)
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Polymerous
Apr 23, 2017 3:13 PM CST
Some "modern" cultivars will spread around a bit.

Years ago, I had 'Black Falcon Ritual' (as a new plant), then decided I didn't want it (it wasn't doing well) and told my garden helpers to dig it out and toss it. D'Oh! I very shortly had a change of heart about that. Rolling my eyes. Very fortunately, not long after, I saw a daylily fan coming up near where that small clump was. I couldn't remember if any seed pods had formed on it (the previous year) and gotten away from me, so I dug the fan up and potted it and waited to see what would happen. I had to wait a couple of years, but it "looked" like it might be the real 'Black Falcon Ritual', so I found another spot to plant it out, where last year it put on a magnificent show. Since then, I was told by a grower that 'Black Falcon Ritual' does wander a bit. (I bought another plant from Curt and put it near this maybe/probably BFR clump, for comparison. I am looking forward to bloom this season.)

Thumb of 2017-04-23/Polymerous/5dfc33 Thumb of 2017-04-23/Polymerous/fcd63a
Database image of 'Black Falcon Ritual' (for comparison), and my "maybe/probably BFR"

Then a couple of years ago, I bought the Whatley legacy daylily 'Sacrament of Healing'. I set some pods on it, I waited too late, some seeds got lost. Some time later, a bona fide seedling came up near the clump (the black seed case was still attached). I potted it, it grew, it didn't look like SoH. During the year or so while I was waiting for the seedling to bloom, two more small fans came up on the perimeter of SoH, but some inches away. Were these seedlings? For a variety of reasons they were left in place, and I didn't get around to digging around them until last fall, after they both had bloomed. The blooms on these fans looked almost identical to SoH (they maybe opened just a hairline better? Confused ) and the bloom time, size, color, budcount, and scape height were identical. When I dug, in each case I found what looked like the remains of an old rhizome or root leading back to the original SoH, so as far as I am concerned, they are all the same plant. (I did ask the grower about it, but she said that she had to keep digging and dividing it, so she never had a chance to observe if it wandered or not.)

Thumb of 2017-04-23/Polymerous/017570 Thumb of 2017-04-23/Polymerous/743138 Thumb of 2017-04-23/Polymerous/908e1c
'Sacrament of Healing'; the introduction image, and my images of SoH and the west side outlier (open a bit better), with the bona fide seedling (smaller bloom, better opening, a bit later season) for comparison

So, it's not just the ditch lilies or older daylilies that can do this.



It's daylily season!
Name: Deb
Pacific NW (Zone 8b)
Region: Pacific Northwest Organic Gardener Deer Ferns Herbs Dragonflies
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Bonehead
Apr 23, 2017 3:19 PM CST
Well, to avoid yet another 3' diameter daylily, I will plan to just relocate whatever the volunteers are. I have a whole hillside that could be populated with extras (if they can survive with no supplemental watering). Dig, replant, water in, pat on the head, and 'good luck' little guy.
I want to live in a world where the chicken can cross the road without its motives being questioned.

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