Ask a Question forum: Tomato Leaf Problem

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bursaali
Apr 24, 2017 2:34 AM CST
Hi
I am a inexperienced hobby farmer and growing tomatoes using hydrophonics. Everything had been well until now when I spotted white areas on the tomato leaves. Then they became brown in a few days. (There are 2 photos attached.) The tomatoes in question are very young, only one of them just blossomed. For the last couple of days the weather was cold.
What can be the cause of this, cold weather, mold, etc? Is there a way out or have I come to the end of my gardening days before even started?
Thanks for all the comments.
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Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Apr 24, 2017 12:30 PM CST
Welcome!

I think the combination of low temperatures, high humidity (caused by the hydronic systems) and lack of air movement have caused a fungal outbreak.

Increase the amount of light (full sun for tomatoes), decrease the amount of time the plant roots are in water, figure out how to circulate the air.

Never fertilize distressed plants but once they are healthy again, use a tomato food with calcium.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Name: Elaine
Sarasota, Fl
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Herbs Orchids Birds Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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dyzzypyxxy
Apr 24, 2017 4:17 PM CST
I agree with Daisy's assessment. You can try spraying a solution of baking soda and water on the leaves to prevent any further outbreak or spread of the fungus. The amount is 1/2tsp. baking soda to a quart of water. Spray all over the leaves, including the undersides. Don't forget this will wash off if you get rain, so do it regularly a couple of times per week.

You need to keep checking the leaves - top and bottom - closely as you start out, to prevent infection and infestation by bugs. Keep a bottle of soapy water at hand, too. Again it's 1/2 tsp. dish soap to a quart of water. This will kill sucking bugs like whiteflies and spidermites without poisoning your plants and you.

Don't give up too easily. Gardening is a lifelong journey and how you deal with each little setback will add to your knowledge and experience.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill

bursaali
Apr 25, 2017 2:12 AM CST
dyzzypyxxy said: I agree with Daisy's assessment. You can try spraying a solution of baking soda and water on the leaves to prevent any further outbreak or spread of the fungus. The amount is 1/2tsp. baking soda to a quart of water. Spray all over the leaves, including the undersides. Don't forget this will wash off if you get rain, so do it regularly a couple of times per week.

You need to keep checking the leaves - top and bottom - closely as you start out, to prevent infection and infestation by bugs. Keep a bottle of soapy water at hand, too. Again it's 1/2 tsp. dish soap to a quart of water. This will kill sucking bugs like whiteflies and spidermites without poisoning your plants and you.

Don't give up too easily. Gardening is a lifelong journey and how you deal with each little setback will add to your knowledge and experience.


Thank you for your comments. I really appreciate. However I want to ask another question. How harsh should I treat the plants with leaf spots? They are very young plants. Should I leave them with these leaves, only dispose the problematic leaves or dispose them completely?

smokingdonkey
Apr 25, 2017 7:02 AM CST
[quote="bursaali"
Hello,
I would like to point out the french way of growing tom's and this is carried out as a regular thing, out door growing (due to the hot weather here greenhouses/poly tunnels are not very common, hence out door toms have a fixture of a see through roof material over the tom's to keep rain off the toms as rain /water will cause damage, all sides of the growing area are left exposed to the weather "hence plenty of fresh air plus any danger of frost and you'll have a structure to secure fleece over the roof area until all danger has gone.
toms are always better watered from the bottom of the plant rather than soaking the leaves,
I myself use the nettle stew feeding method and swear by it and the comfrey /plant method, both these method feeds and the use of planting the tagget plant next to your toms will keep green/white fly away from the tomatoe plants.

Thank you for your comments. I really appreciate. However I want to ask another question. How harsh should I treat the plants with leaf spots? They are very young plants. Should I leave them with these leaves, only dispose the problematic leaves or dispose them completely?[/quote]

Name: Elaine
Sarasota, Fl
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Herbs Orchids Birds Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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dyzzypyxxy
Apr 25, 2017 7:56 AM CST
You can spray them safely with both the baking soda and the soapy water solution. Be sure not to mix it stronger than what I said above, no more than 1/2tsp. to quart of water. Stronger is not better.

On the soapy water, its not a bad idea to rinse it off the tops of the leaves with a little bit of plain water after a few minutes. Otherwise, as soon as the plants have true leaves (and yours do) they are tough enough to be treated.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill

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