Cactus and Tender Succulents forum: New succulents ... will they all get along?

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Name: Darcy
Reno, NV (Zone 6b)
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djinnevada
Apr 26, 2017 4:51 PM CST
Sooooo, I didn't realize (until I was reading through the earlier posts) that different succulents have different requirements. With that in mind, I am looking for advice regarding my new collection...most didn't have names on them, and I'm wondering if they can all be in the same pot. I've also included photos of the ones I've already planted (and re-planted), and if anyone sees something that doesn't belong with the rest, please please please let me know so I can give him a new home. I've already lost my little "stone" guys Crying .
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Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
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Baja_Costero
Apr 26, 2017 5:14 PM CST

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Of your new plants, these are the ones I recognize.

#1 and #3 in the front row are two versions of the jade plant (looks like Gollum on left maybe). They will slowly grow to be like bushy shrubs. In the ground here a few feet tall and wide, obviously less in a container, but they have growth potential. #2 is another Crassula which will make amazing flowers, but watch out because they are also bug magnets. It will develop striking red highlights in the sun. Maybe find a brighter location if any of those 3 plants lose their red highlights.

#1 in the back row is Oscularia deltoides or similar, and it will grow a sort of succulent mat over time. A good plant at filling up a pot on its own, maybe a bit too vigorous a competitor for a community pot? Never tried that, but the plant is pretty tough and the flowers are pretty. #2 in the back row is a Kalanchoe of the most proliferous and potentially weedy kind. Be really careful where you put that one because it will sprinkle babies all over and around underneath it. You'll still be pulling those volunteers for months after you remove the mother plant. Smiling But on the plus side it makes very pretty tubular red flowers when it reaches maturity.

Of the community pots, I like the density and contrast. A bit crowded maybe but these things have a way of working themselves out. The purple Aeoniums have the potential to grow a foot or two tall maybe, usually with branches, if they get enough space. They will behave different under limiting conditions here (sort of conforming to whatever space you provide, limiting their own growth to survive). Which may be a good thing in this setting, but if you separate them and give them more space, you will see them come closer to their full potential. Also be aware those are plants with a strong seasonal growth cycle, and they tend to go sort of dormant in summer.

The pink Echeveria looks like "Afterglow" which grows to about 8 inches minimum when it's going strong. I've seen even bigger plants when they're grown soft. That's another plant which might enjoy its own pot, or could end up dominating here, depending on how they all do over time.
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Apr 26, 2017 5:16 PM (+)]
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Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
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tarev
Apr 26, 2017 5:15 PM CST
Hello Darcy,
First photo, they can be grouped together, though be advised, Crassula ovata 'Gollum' that last succulent to the left can grow really big. I would put that as stand alone on its own container.

Second photo: the purple looking ones which are Aeoniums goes summer dormant, so it will not be a good mix with the others. Then there is one succulent in that container that is in rosette form, the one on the left down, somehow looks like a Sempervivum. If it is, that one is more of an alpine succulent. Just be aware, you will really need to protect that from your direct sun. If it gets too hot, sometimes it blooms, being monocarpic, it will be on its last fade away phase. Or worst, it will get toast and dried out.

On your third photo: the star shaped one, isn't that one a bromeliad? Most bromeliads are epiphytic, don't know if that one is like that or a terrestrial variety. It would need shadier conditions than the others in that container.

4th photo: The purple one again is an Aeonium so as mentioned earlier, summer dormant. The succulent with purplish edge in rosette form, it resembles another type of sempervivum, just be aware again if it is, it is an alpine succulent. Protect from your intense sun. But it still prefers to be grown outdoors.

5th photo: I see another purple Aeonium and there seems to be Crassula ovata 'Gollum' there again. Same suggestions as already mentioned. The furry looking one is Kalanchoe tomentosa, I find furry succulent types a bit more tolerant of sun, but some shade in the more intense part of the day will be quite helpful.

If it were mine, I would group all those Aeoniums together. They do look good together.
Here are some of my Aeoniums, all Aeoniums in one container:
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But arrangements are to each his own..just a suggestion to make it easier to handle them watering-wise. Once they go dormant, those rosettes tighten up, and I don't dare water them, so easy to rot the stem, even if it is well draining. It is just not awake, will wait it out till the cooler season returns.
[Last edited by tarev - Apr 26, 2017 5:20 PM (+)]
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Name: Darcy
Reno, NV (Zone 6b)
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djinnevada
Apr 26, 2017 7:18 PM CST
Thanks! These will all be (in pots) indoors, at least during the winter so they don't freeze to death. Hi-ho, hi-ho, off to planting I go.
Name: Darcy
Reno, NV (Zone 6b)
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djinnevada
Apr 26, 2017 7:24 PM CST
Eeek, Terav, you're right! Just found the tag for the pink star one and it is a bromeliad - guess he'll definitely get a new home....funny, 'cause when I bought him he was mixed in with the succulents.
Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
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tarev
Apr 26, 2017 8:11 PM CST
Oh good you got the tag! We have a bromeliad forum here in NGA, you can ask them how to care for it. The nearest thing to a bromeliad I grow here are tillandsias and a pineapple which have different growing needs.
Name: Kristi
east Texas pineywoods (Zone 8a)
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pod
Apr 26, 2017 9:03 PM CST
It is in the bromeliad family but it is known as Cryptanthus or commonly called Earth Star. It does grow in soil and like the other succulents doesn't like wet foliage. It will be fine planted in your community pot.
Be content moving inch by inch because, by days end, the inches, will add up to feet and yards.

Fulfilling ambitious objectives is usually done one step at a time.
[Last edited by pod - Apr 26, 2017 9:04 PM (+)]
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