Ask a Question forum: Overwatered hydrangea

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kalijo7209
May 4, 2017 7:03 PM CST
We planted some Annabelle hydrangeas a month ago and then got pounded with rain for a week. Out of the six, one wilted. I removed it from the flowerbed and found standing water in the hole left behind. I put the Annabelle in a pot with some dry-ish potting soil and it has perked up some but still looks pretty pitiful. Roots all look white from what I can see. Anything else I can do for it? Is there anything I need to do for the other 5 who are seemingly okay?

Below is the Annabelle in the bed and then after a day of being in the pot.

Thank you!
Thumb of 2017-05-05/kalijo7209/aaa82b

Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
May 4, 2017 7:27 PM CST
You must have a layer of clay or hardpan under your plants (or a really high water table). Did you dig your holes twice as deep and twice as wide as the pot? Did you notice there was going to be a drainage problem? Did you dig any compost into the planting hole? Did you mix water into the planting hole? I am asking you to think back to the day you dug all those holes and planted the Hydrangea. What do you remember about each plant's situation?

Plants really can't be overwatered unless the soil is too compacted (or sitting on clay or hardpan) to allow proper drainage. Or the soil is too dry and the roots burn.

If the other 5 are doing okay, maybe #6 was the only one to be planted in a bad situation.

Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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kalijo7209
May 5, 2017 2:20 PM CST
I don't have any of that info as we had landscapers plant them and build the bed. However when I removed the hydrangea from the flowerbed, there was standing water left behind in the hole. I plan to make the hole larger and incorporate compost to allow for better drainage. At this point I'm just wondering if there's anything I can do for this guy or if he's a goner. Thanks for your help!
Name: Arlene
Southold, Long Island, NY (Zone 7a)
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pirl
May 5, 2017 2:41 PM CST
When we tried to plant a Japanese maple and hit clay I was advised by professional not to just make the hole bigger (he called it a bigger bathtub) but to remove the clay or change the planting spot.

Hydrangeas are amazingly resilient so my guess is your plant will do fine. I don't know where you live but give it light shade for awhile.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
May 5, 2017 3:20 PM CST
Pirl is right - you don't need a bigger bathtub. I was trying to determine if you hit clay or hardpan and how far down it was.

If your other Hydrangea don't have this problem, it might be localized enough to deal with. Sometimes you can break through the clay/hardpan or break it up and remove it. I had some pretty heavy garbage cans for the first year we lived here. Smiling

First, are there ways to minimize the amount of water in this area? Is your house downspout right there? Worse case scenario, you trench and put in a French drain to carry water away from your garden and disperse it to other less sensitive areas (like under the lawn).

Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

Webmaster: osnnv.org

kalijo7209
May 5, 2017 8:15 PM CST
Thanks guys! My plan is to dig a very large hole, remove the clay and fill in with compost and sand... this was also a complete downpour for a week kind of rain so I don't foresee it being a regular problem.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
May 5, 2017 8:29 PM CST
Don't add sand. You can add gravel or something a little coarser than sand like DG. Sand washes down and packs - then you will have a brand new problem (home made hardpan).
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

Webmaster: osnnv.org

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