Ask a Question forum: Young sequoia tree dying?

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Transneptunian69
May 5, 2017 4:58 PM CST
Hi. I have a young sequoia I got last July. It grew well after transplant but since winter it has turned very brown. I've heard of sequoia browning but this seems to be more extreme than cases I've read on that. I live in Tennessee so our winters are pretty mild and I've I've always kept it watered well. Any ideas? Thanks.
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Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
May 5, 2017 6:27 PM CST
Scratch the bark. If its green under the top layer, the tree is alive. If its brown or hard as a rock, the tree is dead. Crying
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Name: Lyn
Weaverville, California (Zone 8a)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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RoseBlush1
May 5, 2017 6:39 PM CST
@Transneptunian69 Welcome! to NGA ...

I doubt if you will ever be able to duplicate the conditions required to grow a sequoia tree successfully in your location. They ARE incredible trees.

Here's a fun link giving some information about these trees. It is item # 1 that tells you why it would be difficult for you to grow a sequoia tree.

https://www.treehugger.com/nat...
I'd rather weed than dust ... the weeds stay gone longer.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
May 5, 2017 7:02 PM CST
I agree

They are growing all up and down the Central Valley in California (they used to hand them out to all the kids at the State Fair in Sacramento) and there are tons of them here in Reno too. I have a youngster in my yard - I planted it at about 6 inches 4 years ago and I think it may be a foot tall now. Smiling

I think the key is the climate - Tennessee may not be cold enough. Even though the central valley gets quite hot in the summer, winters are cold and foggy.

I found a website that lists all the places in the world where Sequoias have been successfully grown:

https://www.monumentaltrees.co...

What all the places seem to have in common is cold, damp winter weather.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

Webmaster: osnnv.org

Transneptunian69
May 5, 2017 8:11 PM CST
Thanks for the replies. I was under the impression, from the guy at the park gift shop where I got it, that these would grow elsewhere just not as quickly or as tall. I'll check the bark to see if it's alive, if it is, any advice on keeping it alive in this climate or is it a lost cause? These are amazing trees, I hate to see it die.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Image
DaisyI
May 5, 2017 8:13 PM CST
How big is your refrigerator? Smiling
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: Lyn
Weaverville, California (Zone 8a)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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RoseBlush1
May 5, 2017 9:07 PM CST
Daisy ... thanks for that info. I've never seen them in the central valley. I honestly thought they had to be in a rain forest type of environment.

I know redwood trees need foggy weather to thrive and lots of rain, but the fog is very important as the trees absorb moisture through their needles.
I'd rather weed than dust ... the weeds stay gone longer.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Image
DaisyI
May 5, 2017 10:58 PM CST
The forestry service has been planting Sequoia trees in the Central Sierra after forest fires for years and they are doing really well. I asked one time why they were choosing Sequoias as it didn't really seem like the right spot.

The answer was that its exactly the right spot for Sequoias but the wrong spot for Ponderosa Pines. When the Sierras and Lake Tahoe were first logged during the gold rush, the native trees were replaced by Ponderosa Pines. So when a Ponderosa Pine forest burns down in a historically Sequoia area, they replace the pines with Sequoias. Historically, Sequoias were found in a strip from just north of Lake Tahoe to just south of King's Canyon.

Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

Webmaster: osnnv.org

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