Ask a Question forum: Adding manure to vegetable plot

Views: 483, Replies: 8 » Jump to the end
Name: kalegal
New York
kalegal
May 6, 2017 12:31 PM CST
Hello. I just finished weeding a small personal plot and have not sown any seeds yet. I got advice from a gardener to put down a thin layer of horse manure BEFORE planting (there is no compost ready to use at that site). I put some down before the rain yesterday but then I read that adding horse manure is not the best option. I want to start planting seeds this weekend; mostly veggies and some flowers. Was adding the manure a bad idea or will it not affect the seeds since it is only a thin layer? I appreciate any and all answers!
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Image
DaisyI
May 6, 2017 1:18 PM CST
I would dig the manure in. As a top dressing, the young sprouts will have to grow through the manure. It won't do them a bit of good on the stems and leaves. The roots need the manure.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: greene
Savannah, GA (Sunset 28) (Zone 8b)
Dreams don't work unless you do.
Deer Bookworm Keeper of Poultry Vermiculture Garden Ideas: Master Level Region: Georgia
Plant Identifier Rabbit Keeper Composter Garden Sages Native Plants and Wildflowers Herbs
Image
greene
May 6, 2017 5:46 PM CST
I used to think that horse manure had to be well-composted before adding to the garden. But I learned differently.
@chelle started an interesting thread here:
The thread "Is it possible to grow in straight horse manure?" in All Things Gardening forum
Sunset Zone 28, AHS Heat Zone 9, USDA zone 8b~"Leaf of Faith"

smokingdonkey
May 7, 2017 2:46 AM CST
Hi,
No is the correct answer, but if you insist on putting horse manure down before sowing seeds then dig in the horse at least one spit deep ( a spit is the size of the spades metal end) and once the manure is down cover it up again with the soil well broken down to a fine tilth.

When sowing the seeds put down "seed compost" seed compost is very light and has little if any food in it as the seed pod has enough natural food to get the young seeds going,
the idea of seed comost is to cover the seed and retain the moisture, seeds need to get to the light as soon as they've germinated and they dont want heavy manure blocking out light and being to heavy for the seeds to get through also manure will hold water and this rots the seeds,

He's a bit ref verious manures,
Hot or cold manure?
Horse manure is made up into a series of a more solid material (like plums) these will hold heat and infact can be used around the likes of roses without breaking these lumps up,
the fresh from the horse will not damage strong grown stems such as roses,
Its not the material as a solid material that feeds the plants its the filtered water that gets to the roots thats the good stuff,
A lot of farms have a drainage like collection area under the cow sheds and its this fluid collection thats the stuff spayed on land to feed the ground ready for sowing etc,

So horse/donkey/sheep etc all give a plum like make up manure and this is known as "HOT" manure.

Cold manure,
The cow's offerings comes out through one channel of the cows delivery system ie the animals urinates and deficates at the same time and through the same hole,
So as you can see all the cows offerings are very wet when they fall out and this wet manure very soon cools off and becomes cold very quickly Hence this manure is known as "COLD" manure,
Its very good to boost your compost heap and helps the humus (worms in the compost) do their job of eating and rotting down the compost heap.

Bird manure,
This can be very high in lime, but is a very good additive for any compost heap,
"DO NOT ADD BIRD MANURE" directly fresh from the bird to plants/seeds etc as it will burn them,
Bird can be added to freshly deep dug soil in preperation for later planting etc,

Pig or boar ,
As these animals eat anything and will clear an area very quickly the manure is excellent and very high in all the goodness for land and compost heap.

Sheep manure
again very good, and its classed because of its shape (plum shape) as a hot manure but because like the horse 'grass eaters with very little of anything else added sheep manure can contain weed seeds etc so think if your just going to add it to areas you dont want chick weeds etc
if you compost sheep and get the compost to a good high heat !! all the seed heads will die.

A very good compost is called quana (its pelleted bird droppings) you dont need to use very much and i swear by it.
Nettle's or comphrey leaves,
You can make your very own excellent liquid feed for all your plants by filling a drum (i use an old 45 gal oil drum cleaned out and filled with water) then fill a sack with nettle or comphrey leaves and a rock (for weighting the sack down) put the filled sack in the filled tank and leave it alone for 10 days or longer, the smell can be strong with the nettle solution but both soups are excellent for both plants and fruits
i use a mix of 10-1 ie (one part the soup mix and then 10 parts clean water). And water the soil around the plants "not the leaves".
Well i hope you've a bit more understanding of manures and feeding Smiling
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
Image
sooby
May 7, 2017 4:36 AM CST
The cow's offerings come out through one channel of the cows delivery system ie the cow urinates and deficates at the same time and through the same hole.

I think this would be news to a cow Whistling

Regarding "hot" and "cold" manure, a quote from the University of Kentucky Extension:

"Remember that some types of animal manures have higher nitrogen contents than others (see Tables 1 and 2). These include horse, sheep, chicken, and rabbit manures. These are sometimes referred to as "hot" and are best used after composting. Cow and hog manures are considered "cold" because of their lower nitrogen levels."

https://www.uky.edu/Ag/CCD/man...

A very good compost is called quana (its pelleted bird droppings) you dont need to use very much and i swear by it.

I believe you mean guano.
[Last edited by sooby - May 7, 2017 4:43 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1435935 (5)
Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
Plant Identifier Garden Sages Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Image
stone
May 8, 2017 12:54 PM CST
sooby said:The cow's offerings come out through one channel of the cows delivery system ie the cow urinates and deficates at the same time and through the same hole.

I think this would be news to a cow


Smiling Actually, this would be chickens, not cows.

In my experience.... 25+ years of adding horse poop to gardens in Middle GA...
Horse poop is perfectly safe to add to the garden... although...
I've heard stories about horses getting hay that's been treated with herbicides that pass through the animals... and continue poisoning the garden plants!
https://craven.ces.ncsu.edu/fi...

Personally, I find that horse poop makes a very nice mulch on top of the garden beds, and yes.... I plant seeds through the manure.

The only problems I've ever had with horse poop, is:
1) when using fresh, the wood shavings may continue to absorb nitrogen away from the plants.
2) when using aged manure, the farm may have allowed weeds to grow next to the pile... after the weeds drop seeds into the pile, you might have a time with those.

so... what works at my house, is to collect the fresh pile, and age it at my house for a few months... I dump the pile in a new section of garden.... makes the ground under the pile more garden-like... use the poop, work the area under the pile, add more poop, plant.
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
Image
sooby
May 9, 2017 9:24 AM CST
stone said:

Smiling Actually, this would be chickens, not cows.



A cowbird maybe? Green Grin!



Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
Plant Identifier Garden Sages Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Image
stone
May 9, 2017 11:16 AM CST
sooby said:
A cowbird maybe? Green Grin!

hmmmm.
Name: kalegal
New York
kalegal
May 9, 2017 9:40 PM CST
Wow. Thank you all for responding to my question! I truly appreciate it! I decided to rake a good portion out of the bed and left just the slightest amount. I will see how things turn out soon. 🌱 Thank You!

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Ask a Question forum
Only the members of the Members group may reply to this thread.

Member Login:

Username:

Password:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by TBGDN and is called "Glory of the Snow"