Ask a Question forum: Can I grow Turk's Cap from cuttings?

Views: 2224, Replies: 13 » Jump to the end
North Central TX (Zone 8a)
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Image
tx_flower_child
May 12, 2017 1:23 PM CST
I would love to propagate some of my Turks Cap. Is this possible and if so, how do I do it, as in where to cut, whether to root in water or potting medium, or?

Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Keeper of Poultry Farmer Roses Raises cows
Garden Ideas: Level 2 Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
porkpal
May 12, 2017 2:52 PM CST
Yes, it will root. Cut a semi-soft stem maybe 6"-10" long just below a node, put it in potting soil and keep moist - possibly cover with a big bottle as a greenhouse. Good luck!
Porkpal
Name: Rosie
HILLSBOROUGH, NC (Zone 7b)
If it sparkles - I'm there!
Garden Art Region: North Carolina Bookworm Plays in the sandbox Deer Dragonflies
Image
MISSINGROSIE
May 12, 2017 3:08 PM CST
I tried to grow a cutting...a funny thing happened (in water) ..the roots barely appeared...but I had that thing in water (that I changed regularly) in a small juice glass for almost a year. I never did grow a decent root..it always looked healthy...and IT BLOOMED. Shock. Then I put it in soil ..and it died.

I also waited for forever to get seeds from the heavily blooming shrub ..Never saw a seed pod. I read that some sold commercially are sterile.
Good luck with your cutting.
Don't squat with yer spurs on!

People try to turn back their "odometers." Not me. I want people to know 'why' I look this way. I've traveled a long way and some of the roads weren't paved
Name: Elaine
Sarasota, Fl
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Herbs Orchids Birds Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
Image
dyzzypyxxy
May 12, 2017 4:12 PM CST
I start lots of cuttings including hibiscus in water, and learned that generally it is best to NOT change the water unless it's getting stinky (has bacterial growth). A lot of plants actually secrete their own rooting hormone into the water, so when you change the water you're going to inhibit root growth.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Name: Rick Corey
Everett WA 98204 (Zone 8a)
Sunset Zone 5. Koppen Csb. Eco 2f
Frugal Gardener Garden Procrastinator I helped beta test the first seed swap Plant and/or Seed Trader Seed Starter Region: Pacific Northwest
Photo Contest Winner: 2014 Avid Green Pages Reviewer Garden Ideas: Master Level Garden Sages I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! I helped plan and beta test the plant database.
Image
RickCorey
May 12, 2017 4:26 PM CST
OH!

Sometimes it seems to me that some plants like Alyssum or Lobelia germinate best if many seeds are crowded much too close together. I think you have to separate them soon after germinating.

I could understand cuttings having the same kind of mechanism. "Here we all are, pieces of some plant that was just ripped apart. Let's help each other root before other species can. We can worry about competing with each other later.
Name: Rosie
HILLSBOROUGH, NC (Zone 7b)
If it sparkles - I'm there!
Garden Art Region: North Carolina Bookworm Plays in the sandbox Deer Dragonflies
Image
MISSINGROSIE
May 13, 2017 8:22 PM CST
Elaine ...probably why the roots were so puny. I changed the water frequently
Don't squat with yer spurs on!

People try to turn back their "odometers." Not me. I want people to know 'why' I look this way. I've traveled a long way and some of the roads weren't paved
Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
Plant Identifier Garden Sages Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Image
stone
May 15, 2017 7:04 AM CST
I find that the easiest way to propagate Turks cap...
Is by layering.... Just toss mulch over the stems as they get tall.
When you have a large unruly patch just start pulling stuff up around the edges....(use a shovel to sever stems). Pot up in soil.... I like to pot up several stems in large 5 gallon nursery pots, and keep in shade. I like to do this on an industrial scale...
Soon I have a number of sizable plants that make a nice showing when I plant them in a large bed.
North Central TX (Zone 8a)
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Image
tx_flower_child
May 15, 2017 8:45 PM CST
Thank you everybody. I dug a little bit up and potted it. If they grow (and don't get destroyed by squirrels!) then they will be plants that I can pass along. But I am thinking that maybe I should do like @stone and go industrial!.

@dyzzypyxxy - that's very interesting that some plants actually secrete their own rooting hormone. Who knew? I may have to use google to see what or if I can find out about specific plants. Or just use the 'smell' test.
Austin Area (Zone 8b)
Central_Texas
Jul 22, 2017 1:28 PM CST
Willow branches also have a great rooting hormone built right in. It's concentrated at the growing tip of a branch/twig. I cut them off at the tips, and soak them in water for about 2-3 days and then either use them to water cuttings in soil, or just stick cuttings right into a glass of water. Someone said don't change the water too often.. I've found this to be true. I had some rose cuttings stuck into colored plastic glasses out on my side fence.. forgot about them, but with what rain fell, they were rooted when I found them again.. The glasses had algae in them but if I'm not mistaken algae give oxygen off to water during the day, them take it up again at night.. anyway.. I just cut a stem of a pink Turk's Cap and stuck it in a glass. I'll add the willow tips and keep you posted.. good luck with yours!

North Central TX (Zone 8a)
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Image
tx_flower_child
Jul 22, 2017 1:40 PM CST
I ended up just doing potting one Turk's Cap. Don't remember much about doing it. But it is growing, small, but growing.

I did that with 2 other plants at the same time but cleverly didn't label them. (Oh, I said to myself, I'll always remember what these are.) They are growing a little faster than the Turk's Cap, whatever they are.
Name: Larry
Hill Country TX (Zone 8b)
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Image
ricelg
May 21, 2018 2:10 PM CST
So @tx_flower_child how did these end up working out for you? Did they make it through the winter?
Name: Virginia
Charleston, SC (Zone 8b)
Image
scvirginia
May 21, 2018 3:00 PM CST
I've grown these from seed and from cuttings potted up in dirt. My first seedling had a different colored flower than the parent's; it was pink while the parent is the usual red-flowered kind. I grew a plant from a cutting from the pink seedling and gave it to my mom. She kept it in a one gallon pot over the winter, and brought it indoors, so it didn't die back, and had one very tall branch which I cut way back before we planted it out recently. Which gave me more cuttings, which I'm now trying to root in water to see how that works.

I hadn't heard that there are sterile cultivars, but I have noticed that I don't see seed pods on mine until autumn. I also noticed that some of the blooms seemed to have had their stamens eaten by something, so those flowers couldn't have produced seeds. Photo attached of a flower with no sexy parts.

Virginia

Thumb of 2018-05-21/scvirginia/47aefb

North Central TX (Zone 8a)
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Image
tx_flower_child
May 21, 2018 7:15 PM CST
Larry — Nice of you to ask. Unfortunately I have no memory of asking this question or what it was that I said I did. I do have 4 Turks Caps of various ages. I think the one I call the baby is about a year old and doing well. But for all I know, I might have gotten it for $1 at Lowe's. Sorry.
Name: Larry
Hill Country TX (Zone 8b)
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Image
ricelg
May 21, 2018 8:02 PM CST
Ha Ha...I love Turk's Caps. I'm trying to grow as many as possible. Unfortunately, they're slow the first year from seed. I did some from cuttings last year, but I'll be darned if I can remember the procedure. Glad they are doing well for you!

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Ask a Question forum
Only the members of the Members group may reply to this thread.

Member Login:

Username:

Password:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by bloominholes2fill and is called "Hemerocallis Daylily 'Wild and Wonderful'"