Houseplants forum: Does my Bamboo Palm have root rot?

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scojo18
May 14, 2017 7:46 PM CST
Hi!

2 Questions:
1) Can anyone confirm if my Bamboo Palm has root rot?
2) and if yes, Can I salvage it?

Had the plant for 6 months - my first bamboo plant. Most likely over watered it & feed it plant food during non-growing season (still learning the basics). The plant is still producing a few new leaves that bloom, but not growing at the rate I'd expect. Also, the base of the plant looks crisp & brown. A few stalks still look healthy, but 2-3 of them are completely browned out. I pulled out a small stalk & examined the roots. Some of the roots were firm, but others were mushy. Please help! :)
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Name: Carter Mayer
Houston, TX (Zone 9b)
Tropicals Adeniums Plant Identifier
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Carter
May 15, 2017 8:09 AM CST
Hi there! Looks like yours is a palm commonly called a Bamboo Palm (Chamaedorea sp., possibly/probably Chamaedorea seifrizii). It's not a bamboo at all, just resembles one.

From what I've read, they like to be consistently moist, but not wet and grown in well draining soil. Fertilize in the summer. As older fronds or stalks die, cut them back.

scojo18
May 15, 2017 10:18 AM CST
Thanks, Carter! I'll try an do more research on the Chamaedorea seifrizii and less on Bamboos.

So do you think that some of those stalks have root rot? What's interesting is that even with unhealthy looking stalks, they only look unhealthy at the bottom. The top of them seem to be producing one new frond.


Carter said:Hi there! Looks like yours is a palm commonly called a Bamboo Palm (Chamaedorea sp., possibly/probably Chamaedorea seifrizii). It's not a bamboo at all, just resembles one.

From what I've read, they like to be consistently moist, but not wet and grown in well draining soil. Fertilize in the summer. As older fronds or stalks die, cut them back.


Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
Always count your blessings in life
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tarev
May 15, 2017 10:29 AM CST
Probably suffered fertilizer root burn if you fertilized at the inappropriate time. You may have to flush the soil out some more, and trim off/remove any stem that is already feeling dried out and hollow.

But the rest of your plant still has potential, just have to give it time to recover. I would refrain any fertilizer right now, since it is still recovering from previous burn.

Also, is the plant in a container with drainage holes?

scojo18
May 15, 2017 12:02 PM CST
Hi Tarev,

Thanks for your response! I will hold back from fertilizing right now.

I've never "flushed the soil out or trim/removed stems". Do you have any recommended reference material on how to do that? I can google it, but if you have any material that you recommend, that would be great.

The plant is in a pot that has a single drain hole at the bottom. I also have rocks/pebbles below the soil in the pot.


tarev said:Probably suffered fertilizer root burn if you fertilized at the inappropriate time. You may have to flush the soil out some more, and trim off/remove any stem that is already feeling dried out and hollow.

But the rest of your plant still has potential, just have to give it time to recover. I would refrain any fertilizer right now, since it is still recovering from previous burn.

Also, is the plant in a container with drainage holes?


Name: Carter Mayer
Houston, TX (Zone 9b)
Tropicals Adeniums Plant Identifier
Image
Carter
May 15, 2017 5:08 PM CST
Assuming your pot has drainage holes, flushing the soil just means running water thru it for a good while to flush excess minerals and fertilizer from the soil. If you can take it outside and do this with a garden hose, that is easiest, but if not, stick it in the shower for a good 15-20 minutes! Thumbs up
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
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WillC
May 20, 2017 9:42 AM CST
Any stems that no longer have a healthy growing tip are dead or dying and are best cut off right at the base. New growth is always at the tops of stems, never below.

It is hard to know the cause of your Bamboo Palm problems. Excess fertilizer is unlikely unless you really over did it. Make sure it is getting lots of very bright, but mostly indirect sunlight not far from a window. Under watering is just as likely a cause as over watering. Water it thoroughly when the top half an inch of soil feels dry and not again until it reached that level of dryness. No more than once per week. Always water thoroughly enough that some water trickles through the drain holes. Watch for spider mites because they love Chamaedorea species.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
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