Lilies forum: L. candidum question

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Name: Patrick
Midland, Michigan (Zone 6a)
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auratum
May 16, 2017 7:21 AM CST
I bought a few L. candidum bulbs this spring and planted them almost a month ago. I was expecting they would have emerged by now. I know they need to be planted more shallowly than other lilies and these were planted just below the soil surface in a lighter sandy soil. I carefully dug up the bulbs and they look fine - they are firm and have a few new roots.

I have heard that martagons are notorious for sulking a year before growing. Does anyone know if L. candidum is known to do the same thing? L. candidum is a different lily as it has the fall flush of leaves that is unique from all other species, but I hadn't heard of any concerns with spring planting it?

Name: Tracey
Wisconsin (Zone 5a)
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magnolialover
May 16, 2017 7:52 AM CST

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Patrick, I would think depth would be the main concern, along with good drainage. The ones I have around were initially planted in the fall, so I can't speak to spring planting specifically. They are very, very early to show green, if it ever actually goes dormant. It could be that it is just out of synch with its natural cycle.
Tracey
Name: Patrick
Midland, Michigan (Zone 6a)
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auratum
May 16, 2017 8:46 AM CST
Thanks Tracey. As there is no sign of a stem trying to emerge from the top of the bulbs I am guessing these will sulk for this year. Drat - was hoping to try some crazy crosses with them... I keep hearing this word patience but have no idea what it means Grumbling Sighing!
Sweden
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William
May 16, 2017 1:22 PM CST
Patrick, I have planted L. candidum in late spring/early summer. It emerged first in the fall. In retrospect I would think this would be perfectly normal as it needs to grow leaves before it can produce a flowering stem the following year, but it didn't occur to me at the time.

Name: Patrick
Midland, Michigan (Zone 6a)
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auratum
May 16, 2017 2:23 PM CST
Thanks for the confirmation William!
Name: Joe
Long Island, NY (Zone 7a)
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Joebass
May 16, 2017 3:50 PM CST
That's really weird. I wonder why it is the only lily that has this type of emergence.
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William
May 16, 2017 4:04 PM CST
Because it comes from a Mediterranean climate. Hot summers and mild winters. So it is adapted to grow in the winter like many other Mediterranean bulbs.
Name: Joe
Long Island, NY (Zone 7a)
Lilies Region: New York Plant and/or Seed Trader Seed Starter Garden Ideas: Level 1
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Joebass
May 17, 2017 6:48 AM CST
Thanks for clarifying William. Aren't L. chalcedonicum and L. Pomponium also Mediterranean lilies but without this growing pattern?
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William
May 17, 2017 9:54 AM CST
Thank You! for the acorn, Joshua. Smiling

Joe, I'm not really familiar with those species, but I believe you are correct. However there obviously are differences within the Mediterranean area and I would assume that would also explain different growing patterns. Mountain areas in particular come to mind.
Name: Rick R.
near Minneapolis, MN, USA zon
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Leftwood
May 17, 2017 3:55 PM CST
All three of these, Ll. candidum, chalcedonicum and pomponium, germinate at lower temps than most epigeal germinating seeds. L. candidum generally grows at lower elevations and hotter locations. My seed of L. pomponium came from the Alps, and seed of L. chalcedonicum are ex Mt. Vermion.
Name: ursula
Chile (Zone 9b)
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Mutisia
May 17, 2017 8:18 PM CST
I grew mine from seeds Leftwood sent me years ago. I think they bloomed the first year (I live in a Mediterranean type climate) and have kept blooming every season (first Liliums to bloom early Spring). Then I grew some from seeds obtained from these plants and neglected them *Blush* leaving them too long in the sowing pan to finally transplant them Fall last year. They did not bloom the following Spring (to punish me for neglecting them Whistling ), but remained looking healthy. I trust they will bloom next Spring (it's currently Fall down here). I want to add our soil is alkaline.

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