Plant ID forum: What is this plant/bush/vine/weed?

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Northeastern Illinois (Zone 5b)
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Murky
May 22, 2017 1:08 PM CST
This is growing on a 40" chain link fence. I moved in last summer and I'm certain I would have trimmed everything back from that fence in the fall (it was a horrid mess of junk at the time). I'm trying to clean out the area and first split and spread some hostas along the fence, but before I pull this out, I wanted to make sure it wasn't something I might want to keep. It's in the Chicago area.

I can't tell you if it ever flowers or how far it might spread out along the fence or even how tall, if it truly acts more like a vine or just a shrub that got caught up in the chain link. Behind it on the other side of the fence my neighbor has a full row of beautiful mature peonies, so if it's something that might be invasive to their side, no matter what it is, I'd probably pull it out. I noticed a lot of small plants popping up around there on my side that I think was the same thing, they reminded me a bit of Astilbe leaves, but none of them were more than 12" tall and very thin stems, but the roots seem to be very deep and very fat below the soil line.

Thanks for any help (and for giving me a break from gardening today while I post this! nodding ).

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[Last edited by Murky - May 22, 2017 1:10 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1451061 (1)
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
May 22, 2017 3:24 PM CST
Looks like a Trumpet Vine.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

Webmaster: osnnv.org
Northeastern Illinois (Zone 5b)
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Murky
May 22, 2017 6:09 PM CST
If that's a trumpet vine, the really funny thing is that all winter I was trying to decide what to plant there, and trumpet vines (or maybe honeysuckle vines) was what I really wanted, figuring it would cover the entire fence eventually, have nice flowers for hummingbirds, and wouldn't have to keep trying to get the dead morning glory vines out of the fence each fall. But the more I read about how invasive it is, not wanting to tick off my neighbor with it messing up their peonies, and that either plant could even bring down fences when they get out of hand because of how hard to control growth for both vines, I decided against it. But that would certainly explain all the offshoots everywhere and how deep the roots are for them. Before I moved in, the neighbor on that side said that once in awhile she'd even bring her weed wacker over and just take down everything, that's how much of a mess the area along the fence was on my side.

But now that it's already there... maybe I'll talk to my neighbor if she's been having the shoots popping up on her side much in between the peonies (although even if not, I think eventually she will). I also considered clematis for the fence as well, and thought it also would be somewhat intrusive, just to a lesser extent. I had finally decided to just split up the existing hostas so they run the length of the 30' of fence and plant morning glories for this year since I didn't have a better alternative.

Since I cut it back so much in the fall, will it even bloom this year? I was here last June, and I certainly don't remember seeing any type of trumpet flowers, the only thing there were a few clumps of hostas and the most common variety of morning glories. I have no idea how old the plant is either, just that they are popping up everywhere along the fence.

I think if I didn't already have a few varieties of fancier morning glories started from seeds indoors, I'd just leave it this year and see what happens. I'd appreciate any advice if it should stay or go. Or any other suggestions about covering the fence with something that flowers.

Name: Carol
Santa Ana, ca
Sunset zone 22, USDA zone 10 A.
Charter ATP Member Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Orchids Region: California Plant Identifier
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ctcarol
May 22, 2017 6:29 PM CST
Some may not agree, but if you are on good terms with your neighbor and want to stay that way, I suggest you cut the vine, paint the stump with weed killer, pull all the sprouting ones and plant your fancy morning glories...assuming they aren't too aggressive.
I know I'll get lots of flack about this, but I just had to have a dog ear fence installed to keep the worst of my neighbors weeds out of my lawn and flower beds.
Northeastern Illinois (Zone 5b)
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Murky
May 22, 2017 7:01 PM CST
After trying to dig up a few of the straggler shoots earlier today, I gave up and just cut them well below the soil line. The roots have to run underground from the main plant, and I know they're more than 6" deep. I don't see any way of getting them pulled up, especially with the fence posts there. And from what I've been reading, it seems they could even sprout a new plant if you drop a 1" piece of stem during pruning.

I'm only renting, so I don't think the neighbor can get too mad at me, especially if she sees I'm making an effort to get rid of it and I didn't plant it. When it's daylight tomorrow I'll have to look inside her peonies and see if any new growth is coming up there, I almost think it has to be there too because of how much is on my side of the fence. If my neighbor has any problems at all on her side so far, I'll start trying to kill off the thing, I'm just not sure how to do that considering its extensive root system. I have a feeling it will be a fight that will last for years.

[Last edited by Murky - May 22, 2017 8:04 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1451383 (5)
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
May 22, 2017 7:05 PM CST
My parent's nextdoor neighbor had one on the fence between their houses. The Trumpet Vine went under a 10 foot wide driveway, under my parent's house and came up through a crack between the fire place stoop and the floor.

My Dad tried everything he could think of to get rid of that vine. He was under the house about once a week doing battle with it. Eventually, he put a pot over the shoot by the fireplace and called it his new indoor plant. Smiling

I'm with Carol. Cut it down and pain the stump with full strength brush killer. Be careful not to get any brush killer on the soil, though.

Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: Carol
Santa Ana, ca
Sunset zone 22, USDA zone 10 A.
Charter ATP Member Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Orchids Region: California Plant Identifier
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ctcarol
May 22, 2017 7:22 PM CST
Communication Is always good. Your neighbor may have some good information as to how to get rid of it, without killing her plants.
Unfortunately, my neighbors don't speak much English, and come from a very different life style. If you decide to get rid of it, cut the vine as close to the ground as possible....IMMEDIATELY paint/pour RoundUp Concentrate, NOT the ready to use on the cut, following label directions. Some plants are tougher than others, so you may have to repeat at some point, but eventually it will work, and NOT contaminate the soil. Always read all directions carefully before using any chemical.
Name: Carol
Santa Ana, ca
Sunset zone 22, USDA zone 10 A.
Charter ATP Member Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Orchids Region: California Plant Identifier
Image
ctcarol
May 22, 2017 7:32 PM CST
Yep! I had the same experience with morning glory. It was so pretty...until it was coming up in the laundry room. Unfortunately, My next door neighbors, at the time wanted me to leave it on the make shift fence. I tried to warn them! After a gallon of RoundUp in their back yard, it was gone...we thought. The new neighbors were rooting around the back yard and uncovered a root...they don't do gardening. Need I say more? Costco has a 1/2 gal. RoundUp concentrate, and I bought it.
Northeastern Illinois (Zone 5b)
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Murky
May 22, 2017 8:11 PM CST
I'm guessing I'll have to apply the RoundUp concentrate to all the new growth that's popping up too to really get rid of it? Or will they die off once the main plant has been cut down and painted with the concentrate? I've got the ready-to-spray stuff, but I'll pick up some concentrate tomorrow and start the battle.

After reading about how hard it is to get rid of and your stories, I'm starting to feel like it's an invasion by an alien plant from outer space. Hilarious!
[Last edited by Murky - May 22, 2017 8:34 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1451439 (9)
Name: Carol
Santa Ana, ca
Sunset zone 22, USDA zone 10 A.
Charter ATP Member Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Orchids Region: California Plant Identifier
Image
ctcarol
May 22, 2017 9:16 PM CST
If it is actively growing, the RoundUp may be absorbed by the entire root system. Wait and see. If it continues to pop up, you can always clip the suckers and treat them.
Northeastern Illinois (Zone 5b)
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Murky
May 23, 2017 8:35 AM CST
Since it's going to be raining here all day on and off, I ordered this stuff, RM43, since it had the highest concentration of glyphosate at 43% that I could find.

Checking outside, there were vines coming out of the foundation of the garage that I cut last fall, several inside the garage, and of course they're coming back already. I didn't know what it was then, but it's already starting to climb up the old siding of the garage. And there are a lot of new plants popping up between and in the middle of the peonies on my neighbor's side as I expected.

I'm thinking of using it full strength, not diluted, on the big vines after I cut them down, and dilute it for only the new plants popping up. I'm hoping if that's done all at once, it might be a good start on killing it, and hopefully it will kill off the shoots coming up on my neighbor's side. I have a feeling though she might have to try to apply the stuff carefully to avoid the peonies to really stop this thing.

I've been reading some really humorous stories though from people trying to kill it, sadly the majority of them unsuccessful even after years of fighting it. One even nicknamed it "Audrey" from the Little Shop of Horrors.

Morning glories shouldn't be a problem for me at all since they're only annuals here in Zone 5, they die completely off each winter. They might come back from a few seeds dropped, but they're not considered invasive here at all, so I'll be safe with them.

Maybe I'll consider clematis for next year, as long as they don't take over the block.

Thanks much for the advice on this.
Name: Carol
Santa Ana, ca
Sunset zone 22, USDA zone 10 A.
Charter ATP Member Hummingbirder Lover of wildlife (Black bear badge) Orchids Region: California Plant Identifier
Image
ctcarol
May 23, 2017 7:01 PM CST
You have the right idea on the Glysophate! The dilute works on the green parts of the plant, but the Stump needs full strength. I'm not an advocate of chemicals, but you have reached that point where nothing else is going to work. It still may take several applications to completely kill the beast. I cut down a bougainvilla a couple of years ago( a 2") stump that still tries to regrow. I give it a fresh cut and more concentrate.

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