Ask a Question forum: Fuzzy growth on Pothos

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Boulder, CO
hkuhn66
May 31, 2017 1:58 PM CST
Hi everyone,

I have had my pothos for 3 weeks now. First pothos I've had. It gets indirect sunlight all day about 3 days a week and I water it twice a week. I planned to report it tomorrow since I finally got a hanging planter replacement and noticed that there were some fuzzy growths on what I assume we're to be new roots. Hoping that if it is a fungus or bug I can still save the plant. Any suggestions?
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Name: Lin
Florida Zone 9b, 10a

Region: United States of America Deer Region: Florida Charter ATP Member Million Pollinator Garden Challenge I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
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plantladylin
May 31, 2017 3:00 PM CST
It does look like a fuzzy fungus growing on those roots and in the second photo, there appears to be a leaf with wet, black leaf margins. Golden Pothos (Epipremnum aureum) are fairly drought tolerant and the soil your plant is in may be staying too wet.

Once you remove it for repotting, you will be able to see if the roots are overly moist. Repot in fresh soil and keep it in a location of bright light but no direct sun and it should be okay. They are pretty hardy plants!
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Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
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WillC
May 31, 2017 4:59 PM CST
Allow the soil to dry out more in between waterings. Repotting (disturbing the roots, adding more soil) will only aggravate the problem. Rather than repotting, put the existing pot inside of the desired hanging planter. Most importantly, allow the soil around the roots to dry out a bit more so they can receive oxygen.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
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Name: Lin
Florida Zone 9b, 10a

Region: United States of America Deer Region: Florida Charter ATP Member Million Pollinator Garden Challenge I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database!
Garden Procrastinator Birds Butterflies Bee Lover Hummingbirder Container Gardener
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plantladylin
May 31, 2017 5:49 PM CST
I'm not a professional but I have been successfully growing plants both indoors and outdoors for 50 years. That being said, conditions here in Florida are different than they would be in other parts of the country. I find that most nurseries and garden centers down here use soil that is quite heavy and water retentive so soon after purchasing any plant, I remove it from it's container and repot into my preferred potting medium; and if the roots of a plant are saturated and appear to be rotting, I prefer to trim off any soggy, rotting roots and then repot the plant into a drier medium as soon as possible.
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Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
May 31, 2017 8:29 PM CST
Your plant is getting too much water. Don't water on a schedule, but rather, water when the top inch of soil is dry.

If you could take a photo of the soil and pot your pothos is planted in, maybe we can advise you on your next move.

If the soil is still really saturated and the pot is plastic, you may want to gently dump it out just so it can dry out.

Although Pothos cuttings root easily in water and will grow in water indefinately, when they are rooted in soil, they don't like wet feet. (No, I don't understand either).
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Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
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WillC
Jun 1, 2017 4:37 PM CST
LIn - All of the Pothos (and other plants) used here in NYC are grown in FL nurseries. Occasionally, I find some Pothos potted in soil-based, heavy potting mixes and they usually do not fare well. The better retailers here and nurseries in FL, use peat-based potting mixes that drain and dry out quite readily. I hesitate to replace potting mixes because it is so easy to damage the tiny roothairs that do most of the work. For me, letting the soil dry out naturally and then watering more conservatively is a btter option.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: Rick Corey
Everett WA 98204 (Zone 8a)
Sunset Zone 5. Koppen Csb. Eco 2f
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RickCorey
Jun 1, 2017 8:42 PM CST
Simply setting the pot on top of a folded towel may pull some of the excess water out, if the soil mix in the pot is uniform and extends all the way down to the holes in the pot. That is kind of a stop-gap measure to let some air into the roots.

If the mix touches the towel, you'll have a capillary connection from the soil to the towel.

Now dangle one end of the towel down 6 or more inches below the bottom of the pot. Now the force of gravity is added to the capillary attraction of cotton toweling. Flannel or batting should also work. "They" say that felt is also a good wicking fabric, but you might have to wash the sizing out of the felt, first.

That should pull out much of the excessive water unless your mix is WAY too water-retentive.

Well, it won't pull out "perched" water. I think it won't.
Name: Charlie Cooper
East coast (Zone 7b)
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ELISECOOPER
Dec 27, 2017 12:37 PM CST
So what did you end up doing and what ended up happening to your pothos? I see a lot of random pictures online of the pothos in general and in a few of them, you can see that there's fuzzy roots on those pothos too. My marble queen pothos (named lady madonna 😉) has fuzzy toes too. I never even thought to check, until I saw this post. She's a very healthy plant other than this. So I'm just curious as to what the solution was or if this is normal (which I'm beginning to think it kind of is). I hope your pothos was just fine :)
[Last edited by ELISECOOPER - Dec 27, 2017 12:40 PM (+)]
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Name: Tiffany purpleinopp
Opp, AL 🌵🌷⚘🌹🌻 (Zone 8b)
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purpleinopp
Dec 29, 2017 8:13 AM CST
It's normal for the petioles to have those brown edges. The fuzzy aerial root is normal.
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