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Tucker Arkansas
Fredrieka
Jun 2, 2017 6:42 AM CST
Can you take a stem from a gardenia bush and transplant it ?
Name: Philip Becker
Fresno California (Zone 8a)
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Philipwonel
Jun 3, 2017 2:41 PM CST
I belive so. But, it would be much easier to air layer it. My favorite choice is to, leave branch intact, nick it a little, and bury it underground, it will root.
Anything i say, could be misrepresented, or wrong.
Name: Karen
NM (Zone 7b)
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plantmanager
Jun 3, 2017 2:43 PM CST
I agree with Philip. I've done that with many different plants and it nearly always works.
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Name: Tiffany purpleinopp
Opp, AL ๐ŸŒต๐ŸŒทโš˜๐ŸŒน๐ŸŒป (Zone 8b)
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purpleinopp
Jun 3, 2017 3:51 PM CST
Gardenia cuttings can work, I have some shrubs that were started that way.

Air layering is a little different from what Philip described, which is ground layering. Either could probably work but when I tried to ground layer one Gardenia stem, it never did take root & I gave up after about a year.

They are generally too stiff to bend to the ground without breaking. Bending as far as the soil surface in a pot might be easier. Lay a rock on the point of contact with the soil, so it stays in place.
๐Ÿ‘€๐Ÿ˜๐Ÿ˜‚ - SMILE! -โ˜บ๐Ÿ˜Žโ˜ปโ˜ฎ๐Ÿ‘ŒโœŒโˆžโ˜ฏ๐Ÿฃ๐Ÿฆ๐Ÿ”๐Ÿ๐Ÿฏ๐Ÿพ
The less I interfere, the more balance mother nature provides.
๐Ÿ‘’๐ŸŽ„๐Ÿ‘ฃ๐Ÿก๐Ÿƒ๐Ÿ‚๐ŸŒพ๐ŸŒฟ๐Ÿโฆโง ๐Ÿƒ๐Ÿ๐Ÿ‚๐ŸŒพ๐ŸŒป๐ŸŒธ๐ŸŒผ๐ŸŒน๐ŸŒฝโ€โ˜€๐ŸŒบ
โ˜•๐Ÿ‘“ The only way to succeed is to try.
Name: Philip Becker
Fresno California (Zone 8a)
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Philipwonel
Jun 3, 2017 4:31 PM CST
Purple !
I was talking two different methods or rooting. Air layering and ground layering, are two different methods.
๐Ÿ˜Ž๐Ÿ˜Ž๐Ÿ˜Ž
Anything i say, could be misrepresented, or wrong.
Name: Elaine
Sarasota, Fl
The one constant in life is change
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dyzzypyxxy
Jun 3, 2017 9:46 PM CST
Philip, "air layering" is where you leave the branch up in the air, nick it and wrap the nicked area with moss or something in a plastic for a few weeks, hoping it will form roots. Then you cut it off and pot it up.

Bending the branch to the ground as you described is known as "ground layering", or just "layering".
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." โ€“Winston Churchill

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