Houseplants forum: Houseplant advice

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kimbolinab
Jun 12, 2017 9:29 PM CST
Thank you in advance for any advice you can offer on my situation.

I've had this houseplant for a couple years now, no idea what type of plant it is. It won't stop growing taller but then falls over, hence why it's tied together and there's a couple stakes in there. I've tried repotting it a couple times to a deeper and larger pot but it hasn't really helped.

Should I trim the tops off? Should I leave it alone? Smaller pot/larger pot?

Any idea what type of plant it is? Can't find a picture that matches and been to like 5 different nursery's but can't find anything like it.

Thanks!!!


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Name: Tiffany purpleinopp
Opp, AL 🌵🌷⚘🌹🌻 (Zone 8b)
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purpleinopp
Jun 13, 2017 7:49 AM CST
Some kind of Dieffenbachia.
Dieffenbachias (Dieffenbachia)

Inside, the combination of lower light and lack of wind blowing can cause stems to be weak. You can cut them near the soil level to force new growth and kind of start over. With this particular plant, if you do about half of the stems to start, then trim the rest after some new growth has started, it will be much less of a shock to the plant. Retaining some of the existing leaves will allow it to continue to photosynthesize. Completely removing the foliage from a struggling plant can be too much to overcome.

If that pot does not have a drain hole, I would be nervous about adding too much water just 1 time, which can make a plant very ill, or even be fatal.
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kimbolinab
Jun 13, 2017 5:14 PM CST
Thank you purpleinopp! I appreciate the advice and I've already trimmed half of the stems down and am hoping for new growth. I'm nervous about repotting it again now, hopefully some new growth will set in and I can move it to a better draining pot.
Thank You!
Name: Tiffany purpleinopp
Opp, AL 🌵🌷⚘🌹🌻 (Zone 8b)
Houseplants Organic Gardener Composter Region: Gulf Coast Miniature Gardening Native Plants and Wildflowers
Tropicals Butterflies Garden Sages Cactus and Succulents Plant Identifier Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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purpleinopp
Jun 14, 2017 1:54 PM CST
Happy to suggest. Best luck!
👀😁😂 - SMILE! -☺😎☻☮👌✌∞☯🐣🐦🐔🐝🍯🐾
The less I interfere, the more balance mother nature provides.
👒🎄👣🏡🍃🍂🌾🌿🍁❦❧ 🍃🍁🍂🌾🌻🌸🌼🌹🌽❀☀🌺
☕👓 The only way to succeed is to try.
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
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WillC
Jun 17, 2017 7:10 AM CST
Dieffenbachias do tend to grow tall and then flop over under their own weight. Tiffany's advice to prune back is appropriate, although you can prune back all of the stems at once without harm. It will look horrible until new growth emerges, but it should be fine.

If you improve the light, new stem growth will be thicker and better able to support the new leaves. Nonetheless, it will need regular pruning at least once per year.

The pot is problematic, but so is repotting. I would leave it as is, but add just enough water so that the top half-inch of soil is dry again in a week. Adjust the amount of water you provide accordingly.

Watch for spider mites on this plant as it is a favored host for them.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
I now have a book available on indoor plant care

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