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West Springfield, Ma
Beethie
Jun 28, 2017 8:48 AM CST
I have a chronic illness and cannot stay outdoors long at all. We have a huge hill in which I am planting annuals (we also have perennials). My question is, when you buy a flat of annuals, can you just cut the bottom of each six pack open for the roots to spread into the ground and drop it into a hole? I like the way everything looks bunched together because it can be seen better as a mass of color. Everything is in full sun and we live in zone 5. Of course I would dig a hole a few inches deep and put down some organic soil first, then place each six pack (with holes on the bottom) into the hole on top of the organic soil. I know it sounds weird but the least amount of work for me to do the better. Any suggestions? Thank you.
Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
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stone
Jun 28, 2017 9:22 AM CST
What specific plants are you considering?
Annuals generally come very easily from seed, and from those small containers with difficulty.

The problem is usually that they have already outgrown those things before leaving the nursery.

The easiest thing you could do... Is get someone to dig you some beds out there and then sow some wildflower seed.

One time I purchased a sack of seed that came prepackaged with mulch and stuff. Easiest flowers I ever grew.

Simply scattering the seed after digging the soil should work really well in Massachusetts.

Those overgrown 6 packs aren't going to work very well.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Jun 28, 2017 9:27 AM CST
Welcome!

You can dig a hole and put an entire 6-pack of plants into it but take off the plastic first. If you push on the bottom of the 6-pack cell with you finger, the plant will pop out. Pop them all out in the house and then go plop them all into the hole. If your soil is halfway decent, you won't even have to add anything but the plants.

Find annuals that will reseed themselves so you don't have to replant next year.

Have you thought about wildflower mixes blended especially for an area? In the fall, find the appropriate mix for your sight and throw out the seeds and let nature take care of the rest.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Name: Lauri
N Central Wash. - the dry side (Zone 5b)
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lauribob
Jun 28, 2017 9:34 AM CST
I like Daisy's idea. I'm afraid if you put a bunch of plastic in the ground, you would have a real mess next spring after the plastic degraded and you'd have to be picking it out of the ground in pieces. This time of year, most of the plants around here are half off. Maybe go for more perennials for less work next year? Also, do you have something comfortable to sit on while you work? I picked up one of those kneelers with handles this year and it sure makes it easier to get up from a kneeling position. Best of luck to you.
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Name: Celia
West Valley City, Utah (Zone 7a)
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Zencat
Jun 28, 2017 10:05 AM CST
The suggestions above are what I was going to say. Both would be less work than trying to cut the 6 packs and risking injuries.

Also, Welcome! !!!
West Springfield, Ma
Beethie
Jun 28, 2017 7:16 PM CST
Thank you all for your prompt replies - I really appreciate it.

I have decided that I will remove the annuals I have from the six packs as I have done every year and put them in the ground with organic soil as our hill is very sandy. we already have enough perennials, so I will be filling in the bare spots with the Dianthus, marigolds, and different colored petunias (I know if they're new wave you don't need to deadhead but I like to snip off the dead blooms anyway).

I also decided to take the advice about the wild flower planting and bought a bag of wild flower seeds this afternoon and will plant tomorrow. I always wanted to try that!
Thank you again everyone!
Name: Celia
West Valley City, Utah (Zone 7a)
Pour vivre parmi les fleurs
Irises Garden Photography I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Butterflies Birds
Cat Lover Enjoys or suffers cold winters Hummingbirder Plant Identifier
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Zencat
Jun 28, 2017 8:41 PM CST
Good luck on your venture! Hurray!

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