Propagation forum: First rose cutting success!

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Name: Carly Rush
San Diego California (Zone 10a)
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carlysuko
Jul 3, 2017 1:58 AM CST
Hello all,

I just wanted to share that I have successfully rooted my first rose cutting. Started a Cecile Brunner cutting on 6-2 and yesterday I was thrilled to see healthy white roots starting to peek out from the bottom of the pot. Today I carefully transferred to a bigger pot.

Now I am hoping to solicit some advice.

There always seems to be complete & thorough information on how to propagate by taking cuttings. However I have a harder time finding information on the aftercare.

As far as hardening off this rose, should it receive shade for a week? Then another week of part shade? Then onto full sun? When should I start to fertilize? What NPK ratio should I use? Any common diseases or bad bugs to be extra alert for?

I am trying to be as informed and diligent for this stage of the process as I seem to lose quite a few cuttings after they have rooted nicely. Though this could be due to the absolute CRAZY amount of garden pests that have invaded my yard this year. Total nightmare!

Any advice and/or personal experiences appreciated.
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Crossing Fingers!
Name: Barbara
Northern CA (Zone 9a)
Region: California Cat Lover Irises Enjoys or suffers hot summers Dog Lover
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iciris
Jul 3, 2017 6:43 PM CST
It's been a number of years since I've taken any rose cuttings, but I had a pretty good success rate.
This is what I did way back when:
Mix 1/3 peat moss, 1/3 perlite, and 1/3 vermiculite really well. Make sure all the mixture has been wet and is still damp. Take the cutting, in the morning on new wood, about 5" to 6" long, cut just below a set of leaves, trim all the bottom leaves off but the last three or four leaves. If there is a rose bud on the cutting, be sure you cut it off too. I used rooting powder on the cut end and even on the areas where the leaves were removed. I used a pencil I make a hole in the potting mixture so not to rub off any of the rooting hormone. I do remember using Osmocote as a fertilizer when the cutting was potted. I placed the potted cutting in the shade in my yard and very lightly watered them about three times during the day. I did not cover any of the cuttings.
After the cuttings started to grow I don't remember if I fertilize them, if I did I'm sure I would have used the Osmocote again. I'm sure some roses are easier to root than others. I've never had any luck of my Altissimo, but I think almost every cutting of Sally Homes took. Old Garden Roses are pretty easy to propagate too.

• “Whoever said, ‘Do something right and you won’t have to do it again’ never weeded a garden.” – Anonymous
Name: Carly Rush
San Diego California (Zone 10a)
Image
carlysuko
Jul 4, 2017 1:30 AM CST
iciris said:It's been a number of years since I've taken any rose cuttings, but I had a pretty good success rate.
This is what I did way back when:
Mix 1/3 peat moss, 1/3 perlite, and 1/3 vermiculite really well. Make sure all the mixture has been wet and is still damp. Take the cutting, in the morning on new wood, about 5" to 6" long, cut just below a set of leaves, trim all the bottom leaves off but the last three or four leaves. If there is a rose bud on the cutting, be sure you cut it off too. I used rooting powder on the cut end and even on the areas where the leaves were removed. I used a pencil I make a hole in the potting mixture so not to rub off any of the rooting hormone. I do remember using Osmocote as a fertilizer when the cutting was potted. I placed the potted cutting in the shade in my yard and very lightly watered them about three times during the day. I did not cover any of the cuttings.
After the cuttings started to grow I don't remember if I fertilize them, if I did I'm sure I would have used the Osmocote again. I'm sure some roses are easier to root than others. I've never had any luck of my Altissimo, but I think almost every cutting of Sally Homes took. Old Garden Roses are pretty easy to propagate too.



Hi iciris,

Thank you for sharing! I have heard before about old garden roses being easiest. I really couldn't believe how easy Cecile Brunner rooted for me. I have had pretty good luck this year with cuttings. I have a new arsenal which is willow water! Seems to absolutely give things a boost. I even have some roses starting to root in water. I had stuck them in with some curly willows. The willows grow roots basically 100% of the time and the natural auxins they posses seems to definitely aide the rooting process.
Name: Barbara
Northern CA (Zone 9a)
Region: California Cat Lover Irises Enjoys or suffers hot summers Dog Lover
Image
iciris
Jul 4, 2017 2:38 AM CST
I've heard of the willow water helping with the rooting. A number of years ago I rooted one rose in water by accident. I trimmed some stems of a rose and placed them in a bucket of water before potting them up. I got busy and had left them in the water for the winter. *Blush* The next spring I couldn't believe how many roots where on the stems.
• “Whoever said, ‘Do something right and you won’t have to do it again’ never weeded a garden.” – Anonymous
Name: Carly Rush
San Diego California (Zone 10a)
Image
carlysuko
Jul 5, 2017 11:30 AM CST
iciris said:I've heard of the willow water helping with the rooting. A number of years ago I rooted one rose in water by accident. I trimmed some stems of a rose and placed them in a bucket of water before potting them up. I got busy and had left them in the water for the winter. *Blush* The next spring I couldn't believe how many roots where on the stems.


What great surprise! Hurray! Hurray!

vurbil
Dec 27, 2017 1:03 PM CST
I've lost a lot of cuttings in the stage just after rooting, so don't take it for granted. I think my biggest mistake has been impatience (most of my mistakes in life can be attributed to this character trait). Don't hurry to take the cutting out of the favorable conditions of the propagation bed/box/bag/whatever just because you see a few roots. The plant may still not have enough roots to survive like a "normal" plant and there is really no hurry to take it out. Just be patient and let it put on some growth. Then remove whatever humidity aide you are providing and see if there is any wilting after 15, 30, or 60 minutes. Take it slow and err on the side of caution.
Name: Carly Rush
San Diego California (Zone 10a)
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carlysuko
Dec 28, 2017 10:29 AM CST
Yes I agree. The roots on this rose were coming out the bottom of the container so I figured I would at least pot it up. It's been hanging onto it's life by a thin thread though because of the very bad spider mites I had. Learned my lesson on that I should have potted it up but sheltered it for much longer as you say.
Name: Caroline Scott
Calgary (Zone 4a)
Charter ATP Member Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Peonies Lilies Enjoys or suffers cold winters Winter Sowing
Bulbs Region: Canadian Garden Ideas: Master Level Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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CarolineScott
Jan 31, 2018 10:39 AM CST
Keep us posted on how your rose cuttings are doing this year ?
Melbourne, Australia [AU zone
whoatemylettuce
Feb 16, 2018 6:27 AM CST
Hi guys,

I'm trying to propagate rose cuttings as well. But my roses' leaves all turn grey. They haven't dropped yet.
Does anyone know what could be the problem? I bottle spray 2 times a day only and put them in a plastic container with plastic sheet cover (as a miniature green house)

Thank you very much!
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Name: Carly Rush
San Diego California (Zone 10a)
Image
carlysuko
Feb 23, 2018 2:16 AM CST
Hi,

How long have they been trying to root? Are you able to check if there are any roots on any of them? When I was rooted mine I was shocked at how fast they rooted. There were roots coming out of the bottom of it's container and if I remember correctly it had only been about 2-3 weeks. Since it's summer for you, like it was for me at the time and we both live in warm climates they are probably pretty fast to root as opposed to other conditions.

It looks like the other one looks really good and the one with the leaf problem still appears to be alive. Have you checked to make sure there's no pests on them? That's what has happened to me a few times. Spider mites will kill a young plant that has just recently rooted, if you don't catch it in time. I also wonder if they have been in the plastic for a long time with water being sprayed on them, maybe it's a fungal issue? I propagated mine the same way. I just made sure that when there were roots to remove them from the plastic and ceased spraying with water. Then I gradually acclimated them to full sunlight. Slowly over a few weeks.

Good luck!

whoatemylettuce said:Hi guys,

I'm trying to propagate rose cuttings as well. But my roses' leaves all turn grey. They haven't dropped yet.
Does anyone know what could be the problem? I bottle spray 2 times a day only and put them in a plastic container with plastic sheet cover (as a miniature green house)

Thank you very much!
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Melbourne, Australia [AU zone
whoatemylettuce
Feb 25, 2018 1:18 AM CST
Hi Carly,

I have yet to check the root. I have try to pull them out very gently to see if there's any resistance but still seems loose. Actually, now I check back the weather info, these leaves symptom appear on the 1st day I put them outside under the sun (about 90 plus minus deg F on that day) in the container with clear plastic sheet cover. I reckon they got sunburn?

Thanks for your kind reply anyway. Your point with cover and spray and fungal is really good didn't know about that. Hurray!

carlysuko said:Hi,

How long have they been trying to root? Are you able to check if there are any roots on any of them? When I was rooted mine I was shocked at how fast they rooted. There were roots coming out of the bottom of it's container and if I remember correctly it had only been about 2-3 weeks. Since it's summer for you, like it was for me at the time and we both live in warm climates they are probably pretty fast to root as opposed to other conditions.

It looks like the other one looks really good and the one with the leaf problem still appears to be alive. Have you checked to make sure there's no pests on them? That's what has happened to me a few times. Spider mites will kill a young plant that has just recently rooted, if you don't catch it in time. I also wonder if they have been in the plastic for a long time with water being sprayed on them, maybe it's a fungal issue? I propagated mine the same way. I just made sure that when there were roots to remove them from the plastic and ceased spraying with water. Then I gradually acclimated them to full sunlight. Slowly over a few weeks.

Good luck!





Name: Carly Rush
San Diego California (Zone 10a)
Image
carlysuko
Feb 27, 2018 8:29 PM CST

Your welcome! Good luck.


whoatemylettuce said:Hi Carly,

I have yet to check the root. I have try to pull them out very gently to see if there's any resistance but still seems loose. Actually, now I check back the weather info, these leaves symptom appear on the 1st day I put them outside under the sun (about 90 plus minus deg F on that day) in the container with clear plastic sheet cover. I reckon they got sunburn?

Thanks for your kind reply anyway. Your point with cover and spray and fungal is really good didn't know about that. Hurray!





Name: Mary
Lake Stevens, WA (Zone 8a)
Near Seattle
Bookworm Garden Photography Plant and/or Seed Trader Plays in the sandbox Region: Pacific Northwest Seed Starter
Winter Sowing
Image
Pistil
Mar 1, 2018 11:20 AM CST
Traditional advice for rose cuttings- place the covered container in the shade! I use an area under a cedar tree in my yard for cuttings. This is not universally true, some things I have rooted in non-traditional circumstances. Petunias sometimes root in a vase on my sunny windowsill in the winter. Now the winter sun in Seattle is quite weak. But these are not even covered.
With woody cuttings, you have to keep them hydrated until they can make roots to take up water, thus the plastic cover. The cut end in the "soil" just can't take up much water, so if they are in the sun they transpire a lot of moisture that cannot be replaced. Also I think Australian summer sun would indeed get so hot in a plastic bag that they might be "cooked".
I would try again if they have not made it. Live and learn.
Name: Frank Mosher
Nova Scotia, Canada (Zone 6a)
Lover of wildlife (Raccoon badge) Birds Roses Clematis Lilies Peonies
Region: Canadian Photo Contest Winner: 2017 Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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fwmosher
Mar 21, 2018 7:31 AM CST
You know, there may well be something to the "Willow Water"? As you know, "Aspirin" was originally obtained from the bark of the Willow tree.It is now made synthetically. "Aspirin" is a known "dilator" of both human and plant vessels, in the latter, widening the vessels to assist the plant to take up water and nutrients. Great idea!

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