Cactus and Tender Succulents forum: How do I care for this plant?

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Julialee96
Jul 3, 2017 9:35 AM CST
I apologize if this is in the wrong place, i'm new to this. Today, my mom bought me this beautiful Black Prince (Echeveria) at a local garden shop. It came in a plastic bag, without any type of roots. My question is, how do i go about planting this succulent? Should I root it in water before planting? I'm a little confused about what to do with it. Thanks!
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Name: Baja
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Baja_Costero
Jul 3, 2017 9:48 AM CST

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Your new plant is beautiful and it should be easy to get started.

Root the cutting in soil, not water. Use a mix that's about half rock (I like pumice but whatever you have available). Start with a pot that's no more than an inch or so wider than the rosette, and wider than deep. Place the cutting on top of the soil, with only the stem protruding into the soil, and put the pot in bright shade until you see new growth on top, at which point you should move the pot gradually and stepwise into more sun. Water when the soil is going dry, which might be every week or two in strong light.

You can expect the color of the plant to change with changes in light. In the shade it will be more green and less black, in the sun it will be a very striking dark hue.

You may choose to take a pair of nail scissors and snip the budding inflorescence (just to the left of center in the first picture), whenever you can see enough of the flower stem to get a clean cut. That is what I routinely do when rooting cuttings. Better to let the plant grow strong roots and get a good start, then next year enjoy the flowers, which are quite pretty.

Keep an eye out for mealy bugs (white puffy insects) which stand out against the black leaves, but tend to hide down at the base, by the stem. The inflorescence is a potential target for aphids.

More info here.

The Echeverias Database

[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Jul 3, 2017 10:06 AM (+)]
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Julialee96
Jul 3, 2017 11:37 AM CST
Baja_Costero said:Your new plant is beautiful and it should be easy to get started.

Root the cutting in soil, not water. Use a mix that's about half rock (I like pumice but whatever you have available). Start with a pot that's no more than an inch or so wider than the rosette, and wider than deep. Place the cutting on top of the soil, with only the stem protruding into the soil, and put the pot in bright shade until you see new growth on top, at which point you should move the pot gradually and stepwise into more sun. Water when the soil is going dry, which might be every week or two in strong light.

You can expect the color of the plant to change with changes in light. In the shade it will be more green and less black, in the sun it will be a very striking dark hue.

You may choose to take a pair of nail scissors and snip the budding inflorescence (just to the left of center in the first picture), whenever you can see enough of the flower stem to get a clean cut. That is what I routinely do when rooting cuttings. Better to let the plant grow strong roots and get a good start, then next year enjoy the flowers, which are quite pretty.

Keep an eye out for mealy bugs (white puffy insects) which stand out against the black leaves, but tend to hide down at the base, by the stem. The inflorescence is a potential target for aphids.

More info here.

The Echeverias Database



Thank you very much for all the info!

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