Plant ID forum: Poison oak?

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Rhode Island
Italysa
Jul 4, 2017 9:25 AM CST
I have a lot of these 3 leafers popping up in my ivy. Is this what poison oak looks like?
Thumb of 2017-07-04/Italysa/34ae0b

Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
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ViburnumValley
Jul 4, 2017 9:30 AM CST
Yes, that is exactly what Poison Ivy (Toxicodendron radicans) looks like.

With gloves (throw-away plastic or dishwashing ones are good), grasp firmly where attached to soil and tug to pull up. Poison Ivy is a vining plant which roots regularly at nodes along the soil surface, from which deeper roots secure the plant and draw moisture/nutrients. This separates it from many other three-leaflet plants that are mimics or similar in characteristics.

Doing this in wet weather helps in easier pulling up, rather than the typical snapping off when the soil is dry.
John
Rhode Island
Italysa
Jul 4, 2017 10:21 AM CST
Thanks! I have a lot of tugging up to do. There's quite a bit of it. So is there a difference between poison oak and poison ivy or is it all the same? I thought "ivy" had pointy leaves and "oak" more rounded like those pictured.

Lisa
Name: Porkpal
Richmond, TX
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porkpal
Jul 4, 2017 12:21 PM CST
They have the same toxin, so I consider them the same.
Porkpal
Name: Susan
Vienna, VA (Zone 7a)
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Muddy1
Jul 4, 2017 7:28 PM CST
I also think it's Poison Ivy. Toxicodendron pubescens (Atlantic Poison Oak) would have fuzzy leaves, and USDA doesn't show any growing in Rhode Island.
This link might help you decide: http://www.poison-ivy.org/atla...
Name: stone
near Macon Georgia (USA) (Zone 8a)
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stone
Jul 5, 2017 4:13 AM CST
Poison oak at my house isn't fuzzy.

I think you have fragrant sumac.

We just had this discussion, and I stepped out the door and took pics of all three in my yard.

The thread "Plant ID. Possible poison ivy?" in Plant ID forum

Personally, I'd be more concerned about controlling the English ivy.

Fragrant sumac is occasionally offered by various nurseries as a landscape plant.
Fragrant Sumac (Rhus aromatica)
[Last edited by stone - Jul 5, 2017 4:21 AM (+)]
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Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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sooby
Jul 5, 2017 8:02 AM CST
I don't think this one is fragrant sumac because it has a longish petiole (or petiolule I think it should be) on the terminal leaflet whereas fragrant sumac doesn't. It looks more like a toothy variation of poison ivy.
Name: John
Scott County, KY (Zone 5b)
You can't have too many viburnums..
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ViburnumValley
Jul 5, 2017 10:25 PM CST
One can examine the buds, and tell the difference clearly. The checkered hatching on Fragrant Sumac buds will never be confused with Poison Ivy. Using leaf morphology alone is nigh on a fool's errand, since leaf variability is Poison Ivy's stock in trade.

Examining how the plant is growing also gives many tacit clues - as suggested above. Poison Ivy vines along the ground, which is where trying to extract some will pay dividends. Sumac doesn't typically behave that way, rather rooting at decumbent branches where they touch the ground and/or forming colonies of stems. Rhus aromatica is more often a stand-alone woody shrub.

I will also be amazed if the questioner has a lot of Sumac seedlings popping up in the English Ivy bed. Rather, if there are Poison Ivy fruit anywhere in the neighborhood, I'd be surprised to NOT find Poison Ivy getting a good start hidden under the evergreen groundcover, and spreading rather rampantly.

Extract some plants/plant parts, and display here. The proof will be found out.
John

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