Ask a Question forum: Pepper plant not producing blooms.

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West texas
herbnewbie
Jul 8, 2017 9:25 AM CST
I have a tabasco pepper plant that I planted in a large pot several weeks ago and have been watering every other day. the temperatures have run 90-110 during the day and 70-80 each night. How do I get it to bloom?
Name: J.R. Baca
Pueblo West Co. ( High Dessert (Zone 6a)
josebaca
Jul 8, 2017 9:42 PM CST
Herbnewbie,
Hang in there and be patient.As long as you didn't over fertilize, your peppers will soon be in full bloom. This may be anecdotal, but in my experience, the drier you keep your soil the hotter your peppers will be and vice versa. That is unless you're growing Ghost, Trinidad Scorpion or that new Carolina Reaper( which I haven't tried yet ). I've got them to get a little sweeter but IMO anything over 200k scoville will never be tamed.
Hope this helps and good luck.
J.R.
Name: Elaine
Sarasota, Fl
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Herbs Orchids Birds Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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dyzzypyxxy
Jul 8, 2017 9:56 PM CST
I agree The biggest thing you learn as you become a gardener is patience. Peppers love the heat and lots of sun. Is your plant in the sun? If not, move it gradually into more and more sun until it's getting most of the day's rays.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
West texas
herbnewbie
Jul 9, 2017 9:41 AM CST
thanks. next question. Can you trim them back and keep them producing peppers for 6+ months?
Name: Elaine
Sarasota, Fl
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Herbs Orchids Birds Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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dyzzypyxxy
Jul 9, 2017 9:53 AM CST
They bloom/produce on new growth, and as they get bigger, form sort of a nice shrub shape. There's no reason to trim them back, I don't think, unless they're absolutely too big for you to manage.

I've kept peppers growing and producing for over 18 months here, with a little staking, TLC and frost cloth during cold winter nights. If you let them get too cold, they stop blooming for weeks. Pretty sure they'll keep going as long as you can keep them healthy.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Name: J.R. Baca
Pueblo West Co. ( High Dessert (Zone 6a)
josebaca
Jul 25, 2017 10:33 AM CST
Hey Herb;
Just got back to this post and saw your second question, and the answer is yes. about 10 or so years ago I bought a Habanero plant and wanted to see just how big I could get the peppers. I live in 6b zone in southern Colorado, so I intentionally kept it in the biggest planter I had and overwintered it in the house where it got morning and afternoon sun. It got to be about 5 feet tall and had a plethora of fruit when I put it outside in early summer, then ...... tragedy ... my pet goose got out of her pen..and....ate it! ( there's no crying emoji here to use but my tears are soaking my keyboard), needless to say if there ever was a good time to eat that @#*!ed bird that would have been the best time for it!
She was allowed to live, but it was a close thing for her and the funniest thing about it was that she didn't show any stress from ingesting all that heat. Shrug!
But in short - yes - keep it warm, moist and in enough sunlight and it should be okay, it was actually on it's third summer when it was so brutally murdered. Smiling
J.R.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
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DaisyI
Jul 25, 2017 12:32 PM CST
I don't think you have given your pepper enough time. Most peppers are long season plants. I transer mine to pots at the end of summer to winter over in the greenhouse and then back into the ground in the spring - my summers are just too short.

Pepper plants are perennials. I've had them live for 7 - 8 years (and then I moved - they may still be there).

My cat ate my anthurium once so I replaced it with a variegated Thai pepper, thinking the cat would take one bite and be done. Nope, she ate it to the ground!
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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[Last edited by DaisyI - Jul 25, 2017 12:34 PM (+)]
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West texas
herbnewbie
Jul 25, 2017 1:08 PM CST
Thanks everyone. It does freeze here, so cover them in the winter, or just don't worry, they will come back?
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Image
DaisyI
Jul 25, 2017 2:35 PM CST
Peppers are tender perennials; that's why most people treat them like annuals.

The peppers I had growing (in California Central Valley) for so long were Marchants, a variety of pepper that cannot be found in most places but make the best pickled peppers in the world. They were beng propagated from cuttings and passed around within the Italian community in my home town. No, I'm not Italian but a good friend was.

My experience is that most hot peppers will survive a light frost but not a hard freeze. Some will survive nights into the upper 20's if it warms up during the day. They lose their leaves but don't die down to the ground.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

Webmaster: osnnv.org

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