Ask a Question forum: How can I kill Purslane once and for all?

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zone 5 - northern Illinois
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ninabee
Jul 8, 2017 4:26 PM CST
It has taken over quite a few areas of my yard. I tried pulling them in the spring, little did I know I was spreading them like crazy. They are back with a vengeance. Round up, vinegar, boiling water didn't kill it. I tried applying salt directly to them and thought it worked cause it all died, but weeks later it's back. I try pulling the baby stems but they just break, leaving the root. I don't know what to do next. Any advice?

And please don't tell me it's delicious and healthy, I don't want to eat it. I just want it gone.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Jul 8, 2017 4:42 PM CST
ninabee said:
And please don't tell me it's delicious and healthy, I don't want to eat it. I just want it gone.


No, you will never hear that from me. I do have an elderly Hispanic friend who loves purslane but I think she must have grown up during the depression because it makes me depressed to even think about eating it. Smiling

Roundup doesn't work because the poison just rolls off those waxy little leaves. About the only success I have ever had was attacking them with my Hula Hoe and then picking up the bodies. You've got to get them while they are small BEFORE they bloom and get those little seed things. Pick up ALL the pieces.

Good luck!

Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Name: Deb
Pacific NW (Zone 8b)
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Bonehead
Jul 8, 2017 4:42 PM CST
Find a goat farm and see if you can 'rent' a couple animals to stake out. They eat everything to the ground. I've used this method for blackberries, which are also very tenacious.

Edit: Or keep a couple chickens, most neighborhoods allow a limited number of hens (no roosters). In addition to a no-work eradication, you'd also get eggs. Purslane apparently increases omega-3s in the eggs and you could utilize a chicken tractor to target your weedy areas. In a small confined area, chickens will eat everything down to bare dirt, then you just move their tractor to a new spot and replant with grass or whatever it is you would like where the purslane is growing. They are happy little animals.
I want to live in a world where the chicken can cross the road without its motives being questioned.
[Last edited by Bonehead - Jul 8, 2017 4:55 PM (+)]
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zone 5 - northern Illinois
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ninabee
Jul 8, 2017 5:20 PM CST
I actually have 3 chickens. They were very helpful spreading the purslane around. As I was pulling and digging, they were kicking it around in search for bugs. (They think I dig at things to help them find bugs, lol). At this point I don't want them eating it because I treated the area with roundup. Sad
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Jul 8, 2017 6:01 PM CST
After the Roundup dries, the damage to the plant is done and the poison is harmless. I found this out the hard way (I used to have the poison control number memorized). And yes, I still have all my original children.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Name: Sandy B.
Ford River, Michigan UP (Zone 4b)
(Zone 4b-maybe 5a)
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Seed Starter Vegetable Grower
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Weedwhacker
Jul 8, 2017 7:35 PM CST
I would suggest digging the plants out (as much as possible), removing them from the yard/garden (I throw all my weeds into a bucket and then put the bucket inside my GH to dry out thoroughly before throwing them onto the compost pile), and then repeat, repeat, repeat. As Daisy (I think it was) said, get them before they can produce seeds!! That is really of paramount importance in eliminating any weeds. And, be diligent. Weeding is never "once and done," even if you decide to spray with a herbicide. Keep going back, dig anything out that is regrowing, remove it from the yard/garden... and repeat. A few years ago purslane was a huge problem in my garden, now it's pretty much gone and I'm overrun with wood sorrel Hilarious! . It's always something...
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Minnesota (Zone 3b)
RpR
Jul 8, 2017 8:23 PM CST
I am assuming there is no grass in that area.
My father nearly eradicated it from our garden by pulling it, roots and all. The soil has to be moist and you simply gently but firmly grab it low and pull, using tool to loosen soil first works even better but that was forty years ago and I simply did/do not go out every day on search and destroy missions.
My south garden , as I stopped worrying about purslane and concentrated more on crab grass and oxalis, is now one third potatoes and two thirds purslane.
I had never seen it that thick, a solid mat except where I have boards to separate corn rows, but as the corn failed it has no competition except a few struggling crabgrass and morning glories
I will go down next week and pull the crabgrass, morning glories and a few other odd balls .
To kill in the garden, I use vegetation killer, as the title says it kills all vegetation.
That also works on purslane but you have to bend over and spray the root area not just spritz while standing up.

I have never had it in a grass lawn
[Last edited by RpR - Jul 8, 2017 8:34 PM (+)]
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Name: Sandy B.
Ford River, Michigan UP (Zone 4b)
(Zone 4b-maybe 5a)
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Seed Starter Vegetable Grower
Greenhouse Region: United States of America Region: Michigan Enjoys or suffers cold winters Butterflies Birds
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Weedwhacker
Jul 8, 2017 8:36 PM CST
"I have never had it in a grass lawn"

Nor have I; Ninabee, is yours growing in a lawn, or ?
“Think occasionally of the suffering of which you spare yourself the sight." ~ Albert Schweitzer /
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Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Jul 8, 2017 8:52 PM CST
RpR said:
I have never had it in a grass lawn


I have never had a grass lawn. Smiling

Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

Webmaster: osnnv.org
zone 5 - northern Illinois
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ninabee
Jul 9, 2017 4:19 AM CST
No, it's not growing in the lawn. Just in areas without grass. We downsized our vegetable garden and the areas not being used for anything are bare and the purlane is rampant. Also growing like crazy in my flower garden.
Name: Sandy B.
Ford River, Michigan UP (Zone 4b)
(Zone 4b-maybe 5a)
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Seed Starter Vegetable Grower
Greenhouse Region: United States of America Region: Michigan Enjoys or suffers cold winters Butterflies Birds
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Weedwhacker
Jul 9, 2017 7:33 AM CST
I'd suggest getting as much out as possible and then putting a thick mulch over the area. Be sure to stay on top of anything that reappears and pull it out when it's small. Eventually you'll win Smiling
“Think occasionally of the suffering of which you spare yourself the sight." ~ Albert Schweitzer /
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Minnesota (Zone 3b)
RpR
Jul 9, 2017 11:26 AM CST
Weedwhacker said:I'd suggest getting as much out as possible and then putting a thick mulch over the area. Be sure to stay on top of anything that reappears and pull it out when it's small. Eventually you'll win Smiling

That is a very good idea as even though it will come up again, it is much easier to pull out of mulch.

I am going to have to try to get picture of my south garden so you can see what purslane garden looks like.

Minnesota (Zone 3b)
RpR
Jul 9, 2017 11:42 AM CST
ninabee said:No, it's not growing in the lawn. Just in areas without grass. We downsized our vegetable garden and the areas not being used for anything are bare and the purlane is rampant. Also growing like crazy in my flower garden.

Now here is an idea, after I moved the roses to one garden, the oxalis that had always been there really took over.
If it were not that oxalis is carrier for a disease that does not harm it but stopped me from growing groundcherries, I would have just left it as I had both green and maroon colored types and it was actually rather pretty when flowering, plus it is good to eat. Blinking

Trade Purslane for Oxalis. Hilarious! Hilarious!

Name: Sandy B.
Ford River, Michigan UP (Zone 4b)
(Zone 4b-maybe 5a)
Charter ATP Member I was one of the first 300 contributors to the plant database! Garden Sages Million Pollinator Garden Challenge Seed Starter Vegetable Grower
Greenhouse Region: United States of America Region: Michigan Enjoys or suffers cold winters Butterflies Birds
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Weedwhacker
Jul 9, 2017 6:40 PM CST
LOL, I'll trade for wood sorrel.

In my garden, at least, if it isn't one weed it's another...
“Think occasionally of the suffering of which you spare yourself the sight." ~ Albert Schweitzer /
Cubits.org - A Universe of Communities[/I] / Share your recipes: Favorite Recipes A-Z cubit
C/F temp conversion / NGA Member Map

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