Daylilies forum: Questions About Pollinating

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Name: Nikki
Yorkshire, UK (Zone 8a)
LA name-Maelstrom
Dog Lover Cat Lover Rabbit Keeper Container Gardener
Scatterbrain
Jul 17, 2017 1:20 PM CST
@maurice,

Thank you Maurice, Thank You!

It certainly seems to be the correct plant and it does produce prolifs. as Courtney Anne is known to do. I think that the pod on the dip. will probably not be viable as you suggest.

Will keep trying using her with TETs and see what happens. Interestingly though, she has no child plants registered on the database which might suggest that she is either infertile or incorrectly registered --or maybe just that no-one has registered any seedlings from her of course.

Can I.pick your brains again, please.?
Occasionally I have noticed that the pistil/style of a bloom seems to be split along its length and separates at the top, a bit like cheesestrings. What causes that, please?
Name: Ken
East S.F. Bay Area (Zone 9a)
Region: California
Image
CaliFlowers
Jul 17, 2017 6:08 PM CST
I have to go out around 6 or 6:30 to gather pollen before the bees get to it. I also remove the stamens from flowers which are going to be used as pod parents, so that bees aren't attracted to them. The stigma in most daylilies is far enough away from the stamens so that honeybees will seldom cause a problem, but larger, clumsier bees such as bumblebees and carpenter bees will generally get pollen everywhere. Once pollen is gathered, I can have breakfast and pollinate at my leisure, up until around 11:00 or so. In hot weather I try to be finished by 10:00.

I arrange the stamens on sheets of paper held by clipboards for use as needed. (Our moderate weather and low humidity helps preserve pollen) I have used pollen up to 8 days after harvest, but the effectiveness drops off pretty sharply after 5 days. Unless you use very thick paper, moisture from the stamens will cause the paper to adhere to the clipboard, so I use a foot-long piece of .015" metal shim stock to swipe gently under the paper in order to detach any sticky spots. A worn hacksaw blade works well too. I now use plastic or painted clipboards for easier removal.

I have 5 clipboards that I rotate through as the pollen ages out. The clipboards provide a good writing surface and prevent stray breezes from scattering the sheets of paper.

Sometimes I find pollen that has been damaged overnight by earwigs, but I will use it if I really have to, as earwigs only damage it, they aren't running from plant to plant, mixing pollen. Nightly excursions with headlamp and hemostats will control earwig problems.

I freeze pollen inside airtight containers such as plastic 35mm film canisters, because I assumed that defrost cycles would ruin it, but if matchboxes work, that's great news, because they're certainly more plentiful than 35mm film canisters.

If your pollen is being exposed to water; heavy dew, mist or rain, it's probably 'spent' and no longer fit for use, and drying it afterward won't help. If this is a continuous problem, you might have to harvest pollen or whole flower buds the evening before bloom. If you're doing this to a flower you want to set a pod on, it is possible to make a shallow cut part of the way around the neck of the blossom (floral tube) and (holding both sides of the cut) gently snap off the flower and pull it away, leaving the ovary and style. The exact place to cut varies by cultivar. These are always a lot of fun to find the next day.

Thumb of 2017-07-18/CaliFlowers/0c53eb

Name: Nikki
Yorkshire, UK (Zone 8a)
LA name-Maelstrom
Dog Lover Cat Lover Rabbit Keeper Container Gardener
Scatterbrain
Jul 18, 2017 11:58 AM CST
Thank you, Maurice,

That is really helpful. Thank You!

Do you know what causes the 'split stigma' I have seen occasionally? Are these flowers infertile, do you know?

Name: Valerie
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Irises Roses Peonies Butterflies Birds
Bee Lover Region: Canadian Ponds Garden Art Dog Lover Enjoys or suffers cold winters
Image
touchofsky
Jul 26, 2017 3:28 PM CST
Another pollinating question. If it rains 3 to 4 hours after the pollen is placed on the stigma., will the cross take?
Touch_of_sky on the LA
Name: Maurice
Grey County, Ontario (Zone 4b)
Image
admmad
Jul 26, 2017 4:54 PM CST
@scatterbrain

Sorry, to have missed your question; the system notifies me of posts that mention @ and admmad only.

The pistil actually is originally three parts and they develop together with a central open channel for the pollen tubes to grow down. Sometimes there is a natural "accident" during development and the three parts are separate. There can be other accidents of development.

@touchofsky
I think whether the cross will take will be affected by several factors associated with the rainfall. For example, how long it lasts, how heavy the rainfall is, etc. Another factor is when the pod parent flower opens and the stigma becomes receptive.
Stout studied the growth of pollen tubes in the style and concluded this "a period of about two hours after pollination is usually required before tubes are noticeably within the stylar canal".

On the basis of his observations, rain after two hours should not change the probability that the cross will succeed.
Maurice
Name: Valerie
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Irises Roses Peonies Butterflies Birds
Bee Lover Region: Canadian Ponds Garden Art Dog Lover Enjoys or suffers cold winters
Image
touchofsky
Jul 26, 2017 5:21 PM CST
@admmad
Thank you so much. Your knowledge is invaluable I tip my hat to you.
Touch_of_sky on the LA

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