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Gardiner, Maine 04345
Strikeapose2
Jul 12, 2017 1:41 PM CST
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I would like to transplant this I've had it for 3 years I want to know the basics like the soil I should use any help would be greatly appreciated about this exact type of euphorbia not all euphorbia just the one identified in this picture I need exact care for this one particular point if you could help me I would greatly appreciate it thank you
Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
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tarev
Jul 12, 2017 1:58 PM CST
You got a grafted crested Euphorbia there. So you got two plants fused together, do you know what succulent plant was used for the rootstock (the lower part).

Anyways, with succulents, I use cacti mix with added pumice or perlite. I make them gritty enough. Euphorbias like lots of light and a bit stepped up watering in my area, due to our very long hot and dry period, no rain for 4 to 5 months. Also, I always use containers with drain holes, not too deep if possible, it needs to drain fast enough so the roots do not sit in too much moisture for so long. You can use a tray to catch excess water, but be sure to drain it out, so it is not sitting in water. During the cooler months, when temps starts falling below 50F, I start to hide the Euphorbias. Our winter is different than yours, we got more rain, so I keep them warm and dry indoors by our south facing window.

So for your area, I would say, use well draining media, plant in a container with drain holes, protect from excessive summer rains. Though it can take stepped up watering during the hot months, depending on the humidity levels in your area, and if rainfall is too much, protect it so it won't go mush. During winter, bring it indoors and position in your warmest, sunniest area. In winter, scale down watering, cold and wet combo kills any succulent very fast, especially indoors when their growth slows down.



Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Jul 12, 2017 10:48 PM CST
The bottom plant is also a Euphorbia. Euphorbia lactea (the top) is always grafted to another Euphorbia.

If its getting top heavy, or you feel its pot bound, find a pot with a wider base but not much bigger than the pot its in. Extra pot means extra drying time so increase the size by only about 1 inch (1/2 inch all the way around).

Euphorbia, like all cactus, need fast draining soil so the roots have some dry time between waterings. I like to use un-glazed terra cotta pots that are wider than they are tall. For soil, use something formulated for cactus with some extra perlite mixed in. If you use something like Miracle Grow Palm and cactus soil, add 1/4 to 1/3 perlite.

You have been caring for this plant for 3 years and it looks really good. I don't think you need any cultural help.
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Name: Will Creed
NYC
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WillC
Jul 14, 2017 1:13 PM CST
Why repot? It is healthy and doing well and nothing suggests it would benefit from a larger pot. This is a plant with a small, fine root system that does not do well in larger pots. Much can go wrong when repotting, so why risk it?
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Horticultural Help, NYC
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Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Jul 14, 2017 3:23 PM CST
Good question.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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