Ask a Question forum: Planting Bulbs & Hosta for full sun

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Central Illinois
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countrycottagemm
Jul 14, 2017 7:25 AM CST
Planting bulbs will be a first time go for me this fall & spring.

A few questions on that....

(1) Do they come up and bloom the first year or is there a delay?

(2) Will each bulb only produce one stem and one flower? Like the tulips? One flower for each bulb? What about other varieties like hollyhocks? I see to plant them several inches apart, but the photos I have seen have them growing so close they are touching.

(3) After you have planted your bulbs, how do you keep track of exactly where they are so you don't plant something else on top of them? Or possibly to transplant down the road?

I want to plant many of each in groups to produce that full over-flowing cottage look.

Also, to avoid creating a second post I'll just add my hosta question here...

Any south facing full sun hosta tolerant recommendations?

Name: Jai or Jack
WV (Zone 6b)
Om shanti om.
Container Gardener Multi-Region Gardener Garden Photography Amaryllis Zinnias Gardens in Buckets
Region: Pennsylvania Annuals Houseplants Plant and/or Seed Trader Birds Garden Ideas: Level 1
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Jai_Ganesha
Jul 14, 2017 9:36 AM CST
countrycottagemm said:Planting bulbs will be a first time go for me this fall & spring.

A few questions on that....

(1) Do they come up and bloom the first year or is there a delay?


In general they come up the spring after you plant them. So if you plant them in October of 2017 you'll get blooms in March-May of 2018.

(2) Will each bulb only produce one stem and one flower? Like the tulips? One flower for each bulb? What about other varieties like hollyhocks? I see to plant them several inches apart, but the photos I have seen have them growing so close they are touching.


This varies significantly for each kind of bulb and for each variety. Most fancy tulips have a single flower per bulb but there are smaller, species tulips which have several. Many daffodils/jonquils have several blooms per bulb, depending on variety.

(3) After you have planted your bulbs, how do you keep track of exactly where they are so you don't plant something else on top of them? Or possibly to transplant down the road?


Personally I use little plant labels I get at the Dollar Tree. But they're the first things that come up in spring so it's hard to forget.

I want to plant many of each in groups to produce that full over-flowing cottage look.


You'll probably want to look for varieties that are good naturalizers. These will spread year-to-year and give that look you're talking about. Some varieties of tulip are more tender or finicky and don't naturalize or stick around for more than a season or two, but other varieties of tulip will reliably spread and grow and bloom every single year. There are dozens or hundreds of each kind so it varies a lot.

Also, to avoid creating a second post I'll just add my hosta question here...

Any south facing full sun hosta tolerant recommendations?



I don't know much about hostas despite having several.
Keep going!
[Last edited by Jai_Ganesha - Jul 14, 2017 9:37 AM (+)]
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springfield MO area (Zone 6a)
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Frillylily
Jul 14, 2017 9:48 AM CST
I don't know of any hostas that will take south full sun. But I don't know about Illinois, maybe the summers there are not as scorching as here. ?
I'd probably choose a different plant for full sun. Daylilies, salvia, sage, daisies, ect.
Name: Jai or Jack
WV (Zone 6b)
Om shanti om.
Container Gardener Multi-Region Gardener Garden Photography Amaryllis Zinnias Gardens in Buckets
Region: Pennsylvania Annuals Houseplants Plant and/or Seed Trader Birds Garden Ideas: Level 1
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Jai_Ganesha
Jul 14, 2017 9:55 AM CST
I used to live in Belleville (on Scott AFB) and no hostas would take full sun there for sure.

But some coleus might as long as they are not allowed to dry out. Sometimes I think people who like hostas would also like some of the more sun-friendly varieties of coleus. It's just as reliable and easy as hostas to grow but you can change the coleus up every year with new varieties. There are approximately eleventy zillion varieties.
Keep going!
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
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sooby
Jul 14, 2017 10:10 AM CST
If you're planting bulbs in spring they are likely to be summer flowering so should flower the same year you plant them (if they are of flowering size). Bulbs planted in fall would typically flower the following year.

Hollyhocks do not grow from bulbs so it sounds like you are planting a mixture of different kinds of plants and not asking about bulbs only?

Hostas tend to struggle in full sun here in Ontario, Canada, although there may be some that tolerate it better than others. There is a specific hosta forum on NGA and you may get some suggestions for the more sun tolerant ones there:

https://garden.org/forums/view...
Central Illinois
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countrycottagemm
Jul 15, 2017 6:04 AM CST
What are good naturalizes?


Jai_Ganesha said:

In general they come up the spring after you plant them. So if you plant them in October of 2017 you'll get blooms in March-May of 2018.



This varies significantly for each kind of bulb and for each variety. Most fancy tulips have a single flower per bulb but there are smaller, species tulips which have several. Many daffodils/jonquils have several blooms per bulb, depending on variety.



Personally I use little plant labels I get at the Dollar Tree. But they're the first things that come up in spring so it's hard to forget.



You'll probably want to look for varieties that are good naturalizers. These will spread year-to-year and give that look you're talking about. Some varieties of tulip are more tender or finicky and don't naturalize or stick around for more than a season or two, but other varieties of tulip will reliably spread and grow and bloom every single year. There are dozens or hundreds of each kind so it varies a lot.



I don't know much about hostas despite having several.

Name: Jai or Jack
WV (Zone 6b)
Om shanti om.
Container Gardener Multi-Region Gardener Garden Photography Amaryllis Zinnias Gardens in Buckets
Region: Pennsylvania Annuals Houseplants Plant and/or Seed Trader Birds Garden Ideas: Level 1
Image
Jai_Ganesha
Jul 15, 2017 7:30 AM CST
Good naturalizers are those bulbs that will reproduce asexually undergrown at the same time as growing and blooming.

So for example, if you plant three daffodils and in a year you have 5 or 6, those are good naturalizers.

There are hundreds of examples in terms of species, varieties, and named cultivars. The only way to know which is which is to look through a catalog. If you type "bulb catalog" on Google you'll find several websites offering to send you free paper catalogs in the mail or emailed catalogs. Go through those and look for those which say they'll naturalize easily.
Keep going!

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