Ask a Question forum: Tomato Leaves Yellowing and Drying Up

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Name: Susan Pingitore
IL
SusanPing
Jul 19, 2017 10:40 AM CST
I live in Zone 5. Two of my tomato plants, one an Early Girl and the other a Juliette grape tomato, are exhibiting signs of disease. The leaves are getting wilted looking, then drying up and turning brown. I cut off the dried up leaves today. Is there something I can use to treat them?

Thumb of 2017-07-19/SusanPing/55312e
Thumb of 2017-07-19/SusanPing/7e490a

The stem of the part of the plant I cut today looks healthy to me, but I'm certainly not versed in this.

Thanks for your help!!!!

Susan
[Last edited by SusanPing - Jul 19, 2017 11:50 AM (+)]
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Name: Paul
Utah (Zone 5b)
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Paul2032
Jul 19, 2017 10:58 AM CST
Pictures would help. There are a number of problems which are exhibited on the leaves....often different problems in different areas of the country with different rainfall, humidity, etc. Cut thru one of the stems and if it is discolored it might be fusarium or verticillium wilt.
Paul Smith Pleasant Grove, Utah
Name: Elaine
Sarasota, Fl
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dyzzypyxxy
Jul 19, 2017 11:08 AM CST
My tomatoes get all sorts of diseases down here in Florida, and I've had a little bit of success with giving the plants a douse with a gallon or so of water plus hydrogen peroxide. Get a big bottle of peroxide at the drug store or grocery store. Mix it with water at 8oz. to a gallon. Douse the whole root area of the plant with this. Each plant showing symptoms gets a whole gallon, as you really need to saturate all the soil around the plant with this stuff.

Sometimes, (only sometimes) the infection will be stopped by this treatment. It seems to work best if I catch the plants pretty early in the stages of the disease i.e as soon as symptoms appear. So, well what can I say? Hurry!

If it works, it may carry your plants through to the end of the season, at least. Then, when you remove the plants, turn the soil over so that it gets well exposed to the cold during the winter to hopefully kill off the pathogens. Better not plant tomatoes in the same area next year, either.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Name: Susan Pingitore
IL
SusanPing
Jul 19, 2017 11:51 AM CST
Paul2032 said:Pictures would help. There are a number of problems which are exhibited on the leaves....often different problems in different areas of the country with different rainfall, humidity, etc. Cut thru one of the stems and if it is discolored it might be fusarium or verticillium wilt.


I've updated the post and added some photos.

Thanks!

Susan
Name: Susan Pingitore
IL
SusanPing
Jul 19, 2017 11:53 AM CST
dyzzypyxxy said:My tomatoes get all sorts of diseases down here in Florida, and I've had a little bit of success with giving the plants a douse with a gallon or so of water plus hydrogen peroxide. Get a big bottle of peroxide at the drug store or grocery store. Mix it with water at 8oz. to a gallon. Douse the whole root area of the plant with this. Each plant showing symptoms gets a whole gallon, as you really need to saturate all the soil around the plant with this stuff.

Sometimes, (only sometimes) the infection will be stopped by this treatment. It seems to work best if I catch the plants pretty early in the stages of the disease i.e as soon as symptoms appear. So, well what can I say? Hurry!

If it works, it may carry your plants through to the end of the season, at least. Then, when you remove the plants, turn the soil over so that it gets well exposed to the cold during the winter to hopefully kill off the pathogens. Better not plant tomatoes in the same area next year, either.


I've updated the post and added some images. Do you think I should still give the peroxide a try? The thought of not getting any harvest on these plants is upsetting. Sighing!

Susan
Name: Elaine
Sarasota, Fl
The one constant in life is change
Cat Lover Master Gardener: Florida Tropicals Multi-Region Gardener Vegetable Grower Region: Florida
Herbs Orchids Birds Garden Ideas: Level 2 Garden Sages Celebrating Gardening: 2015
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dyzzypyxxy
Jul 19, 2017 12:41 PM CST
Well, one thing I know for sure, it won't hurt the plant to try, and peroxide isn't expensive or hard to find. I'd for sure give it a go.

From your pictures you've maybe got a case of fusarium, or one of the Early Blight diseases, I think.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill

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