Cactus and Tender Succulents forum: Why is my jade wrinkly?

Views: 1744, Replies: 10 » Jump to the end
Los Angeles
Image
krystenr1
Jul 20, 2017 9:54 AM CST
Too much or too little water perhaps?


Thumb of 2017-07-20/krystenr1/ae70a8
Thumb of 2017-07-20/krystenr1/453f3e

Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Image
DaisyI
Jul 20, 2017 10:40 AM CST
Over-watering and under-watering often look the same. So, if the soil is very dry, water and within a couple days, the leaves should puff up. If the soil is damp, don't water and suspect that you are dealing with root rot.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

Webmaster: osnnv.org
Los Angeles
Image
krystenr1
Jul 20, 2017 12:08 PM CST
DaisyI said:Over-watering and under-watering often look the same. So, if the soil is very dry, water and within a couple days, the leaves should puff up. If the soil is damp, don't water and suspect that you are dealing with root rot.


I forgot to water it for a really long time so I suspect underwatering. I just watered it yesterday so I'm hoping it will puff back up like you said soon. Should I wait to water again until it does?
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Image
DaisyI
Jul 20, 2017 1:48 PM CST
You should wait to water again when it needs water again. Smiling Hopefully, you didn't let it be dry for so long that the roots died. That's why under-watering and over-watering tend to look the same. No functioning roots sending moisture to the leaves. We will all hope with you. Crossing Fingers!
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Hummingbirder
Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator
Image
Baja_Costero
Jul 20, 2017 1:59 PM CST

Moderator

Yes, as usual Daisy is so right. Smiling

Some people like to wait until their succulents shrivel or wilt to water (personal preference I guess) but a much better general guide in my opinion (as far as the health of the plant goes) is to water well and then wait however long it takes for the soil to go dry at depth to water again.

When you figure out the right time interval, you have a great starting point for the future. You can then tweak it as temperature/humidity/light change with the passing of the seasons. If conditions do not change, the time interval will not change either. Here in our exceptionally mild climate (no heat no cold) I actually water on a very regular schedule that I have worked out through experience. The same approach might work in a very bright indoor climate controlled situation (my indoor plants also on a regular schedule). You still have to check the soil to confirm whatever approach you choose. Smiling
Los Angeles
Image
krystenr1
Aug 25, 2017 11:26 AM CST
I followed your advice but it seems to be getting more wrinkly Sad

Should I pull it up and see if there are any viable roots left? I definitely left it unwatered for too long Sad


Thumb of 2017-08-25/krystenr1/4600f6
Thumb of 2017-08-25/krystenr1/d373d8

Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
Garden Sages Plant Identifier
Image
DaisyI
Aug 25, 2017 5:27 PM CST
That might be a good idea.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

Webmaster: osnnv.org
Name: Yardenman
Maryland (Zone 7a)
Image
Yardenman
Aug 31, 2017 3:51 AM CST
Baja_Costero said:Yes, as usual Daisy is so right. Smiling

Some people like to wait until their succulents shrivel or wilt to water (personal preference I guess) but a much better general guide in my opinion (as far as the health of the plant goes) is to water well and then wait however long it takes for the soil to go dry at depth to water again.

Smiling


At what depth do you measure, and how?

Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Hummingbirder
Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator
Image
Baja_Costero
Aug 31, 2017 12:20 PM CST

Moderator

A couple of inches down, ideally. Use a moisture meter, a bamboo chopstick (tends to stick to moist soil), or your finger. Also try to track the moisture by repotting at a time when you think it's going dry, but is not completely dry. Which provides a great chance to directly examine the soil and determine if you were right.
[Last edited by Baja_Costero - Aug 31, 2017 7:20 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1539068 (9)
Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
Always count your blessings in life
Cat Lover Houseplants Plays in the sandbox Region: California Orchids Plant Lover: Loves 'em all!
Composter Cactus and Succulents Dragonflies Hummingbirder Amaryllis Container Gardener
Image
tarev
Aug 31, 2017 12:32 PM CST
krystenr1, I wonder if you can try and spritz some water on the branch and stem. I am finding now with my Crassulas due to the extended dry heat conditions and very low humidity levels, they are responding quite well with spritzing of water on the branches and stem, as well as watering the media. It was a surprise for me when I observed that in my jades and other Crassulas, I guess it needs to feel a good cool down and at the same time it is thirsty too at this very dry time of the year.

Do the spritzing early part of the day, so it dries out at days end.
Name: Baja
Baja California (Zone 11b)
Cactus and Succulents Seed Starter Foliage Fan Xeriscape Container Gardener Hummingbirder
Native Plants and Wildflowers Garden Photography Region: Mexico Plant Identifier Forum moderator Plant Database Moderator
Image
Baja_Costero
Aug 31, 2017 3:36 PM CST

Moderator

As long as the plant is green there is still hope. If the roots are working properly, one proper watering should be enough to pump them back up again, at least some of the way. If that doesn't happen, the roots are no longer working (most likely), or the plant is in some kind of total stress shutdown (total arrest) and you'll just have to provide a protected location and good care and wait it out.

If the roots are not working then the plant will have to grow new ones. Which is not normally any problem. Fallen leaves can root, any stem that touches the soil will root. But the water expense to elaborate those roots and survive in the interim will come at a precious cost to the plant when it's already so dehydrated. I am not optimistic about its survival in this scenario but jades can be incredibly durable plants so don't give up. Smiling

What will tell you the plant is making a turnaround is when there are new leaves and those leaves are plump. The lower leaves are going to look sadder longer and most of them may just fall off. That's kind of normal and not a problem if they're being replaced.

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Cactus and Tender Succulents forum
Only the members of the Members group may reply to this thread.

Member Login:

Username:

Password:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by plantmanager and is called "Aloe Sinkatana"