Ask a Question forum: Endless Summer Hydrangea

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Apple Valley, MN
Christyjosch
Jul 20, 2017 11:57 PM CST
I am in Minnesota and this is the second summer I've had my Endless Summer Hydrangea, but it still hasn't bloomed this summer. I fertilize it with Miracid. It has morning shade & afternoon sun. What am I doing wrong? And am I supposed to be cutting the old branches off that don't have any growth?
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Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
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sooby
Jul 21, 2017 3:58 AM CST
We had one here and it got a lot of winterkill. After every winter a bit more of it died back, it didn't flower and eventually died altogether. I think it survived about three years. I concluded it wasn't hardy enough for my USDA Zone 4 area but I think you are a zone or two milder than that, maybe Zone 6?

It probably would be better in a grass-free spot - do you know why the grass is not doing as well around the hydrangea? How often are you fertilizing it (could it be getting too much?). Do you know the pH of your soil?

It might prefer morning sun and afternoon shade, although the one we had here had that and still dwindled away. You might as well cut off the dead branches.
Name: Christine
Saugerties, NY zone 5a
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Christine
Jul 21, 2017 6:11 AM CST
I agree with Sue, the grass is choking out the hydrangea, and you can cut off all the old dead wood, it probably will not flower this year but prepare the soil around it for next season and watch how much you fertilize it. Is it getting enough water?
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Name: Rj
Just S of the twin cities of M (Zone 4b)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Plant Identifier Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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crawgarden
Jul 21, 2017 6:28 AM CST
Hi Christy, I've had an Endless Summer since they have come out, that being said they are iffy at best in our climate. As you know they bloom on both old and new wood, I do not prune out the dead twigs until the first week in June.
Last winter was very mild and we really did not have much snow for insulation. I typically have much better luck if I mound leaves around the bush in the fall.
2nd year is a little early yet, typically it takes about 3 years for a lot of perennials to take off.
Agree with Sue, morning sun and afternoon shade would be best.
I would not give it any more fertilizer this year.
Endless summer will survive in our z4b, but typically will not bloom as well as in the higher zones.
Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed.
[Last edited by crawgarden - Jul 21, 2017 6:37 AM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1508134 (4)
Name: Philip Becker
Fresno California (Zone 8a)
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Philipwonel
Jul 21, 2017 1:17 PM CST
Welcome! and I agree
Let me go hear. 😁
Don't prune it in fall. Cover it with freeze cloth. Prune, in spring, when it starts to bud.

Be carefull with fertilizer. I belive they make a special type.

Also fertilize with Epson Salt, as directed on box. It releases a nutrient the plant needs, and helps it bloom, and stay right color.

When dormant, move to where, it will only get morning to noon sun.

Keep grass and anything else, a couple feet beyond drip line.

Drip line, outer most edges of branches, is where you want furrow, for watering and fertilizing, wonce it gets established to new home.

If you transplant it. Make furrow, where you cut roots off, to start out.
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Whew, did i cover everything? 👹
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Anything i say, could be misrepresented, or wrong.
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
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sooby
Jul 21, 2017 3:03 PM CST
Prune how, Philip? If this hydrangea is pruned the wrong way in spring it will cut off the flower buds that have already formed the previous year leaving you only with flowers that form on the current year's growth. Epsom salts may not do any harm but unless there is a shortage of magnesium in the soil it don't believe it would do any good. The colours of hydrangea relate to aluminum (which is why they are blue in acidic soil because more aluminum becomes available at lower soil pH).
Name: Philip Becker
Fresno California (Zone 8a)
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Philipwonel
Jul 21, 2017 3:36 PM CST
@sooby: You should read up on Empson Salt.
Also ! Go back to my reply.
And tell me, what part i didn't explain clearly !!!
Because, i haven't a clue 😕
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Anything i say, could be misrepresented, or wrong.
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
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sooby
Jul 21, 2017 4:08 PM CST
Philip, to answer your question, you said "Prune, in spring, when it starts to bud." When people shorten the branches in spring they cut off the flower buds on hydrangeas that flower on the previous year's wood, hence no flowers if it is one that only blooms on last year's wood, or fewer flowers if it is one like Endless Summer that blooms on both old and new wood. So I was thinking to clarify, if you meant take out dead wood in spring rather than prune back live wood.

Epsom salts is magnesium sulfate. If the soil is deficient in magnesium it would be good for the plants. If the soil is not deficient in magnesium it won't do anything. (If the plant is deficient in magnesium it will typically have interveinal chlorosis but not on the youngest leaves, that would be iron or manganese deficiency). It is aluminum that influences whether coloured hydranges flower blue or pink. This article may help:

http://www.caes.uga.edu/newswi...

Edited to correct typo
[Last edited by sooby - Jul 21, 2017 4:10 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1508615 (8)
Name: Philip Becker
Fresno California (Zone 8a)
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Philipwonel
Jul 21, 2017 4:55 PM CST
Sue, i was thinking of pruning out anything that didnt make it through the severe winter. The more wood the less die back.
Also, that variety grows on new and previous years growth.

Empson salt is also good for other plants, namely, roses, peppers, eggplant, and tomatoes. It makes a nutrient the plants need available.
I can't remember name of nutrient, sorry. Maybe it only works in plants that are planted in ground. Shrug!
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Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
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sooby
Jul 21, 2017 5:10 PM CST
Philipwonel said:Sue, i was thinking of pruning out anything that didnt make it through the severe winter.


I thought so but to some people pruning means "cutting back" so I wanted that to be clear because that would reduce the blooms.

Philipwonel said:
Empson salt is also good for other plants, namely, roses, peppers, eggplant, and tomatoes. It makes a nutrient the plants need available.
I can't remember name of nutrient, sorry. Maybe it only works in plants that are planted in ground. Shrug!
😎😎😎


But I told you the nutrient above Smiling It is magnesium. ALL plants need magnesium. Some may need more than others, some soils may be deficient, and usually it is added to container mixes as dolomitic limestone (which is a longer lasting form of magnesium than Epsom salts). It is often not included in fertilizers in which case it may need to be supplied in some way. Since it occurs naturally in soil you do not need to add it unless the soil does not contain enough for some reason. That's more likely on an acidic soil.
[Last edited by sooby - Jul 21, 2017 5:11 PM (+)]
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Name: Archivesgirl
Salisbury, MD (Zone 7b)
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Archivesgirl
Jul 21, 2017 5:16 PM CST
I agree with most everything said. The grass is number one. Pull out the grass out widely around the plant. Planting in good soil and getting water is absolute (do you water your plants or have irrigation? Mine are on a drip line). As for color, I use holly-tone fertilizer for acid loving plants (i.e., rhododendrons, evergreens, hydrangeas, hollies). Put some mulch around it (but don't cover the plant) for moisture retention. Mine didn't do well this year but still bloomed because we had a late 10" snow (unusual for the Eastern Shore of MD).

Welcome! I agree Gayle
Apple Valley, MN
Christyjosch
Jul 25, 2017 10:33 AM CST
Wow...thank you for all the expert advice! I already pulled out the grass around the plant and started watering it more often. I will look into the Holly-Tone Fertilizer but will quit fertilizing it for this year. I will move it to a spot that gets morning sun and afternoon shade in the fall. I won't prune it in the fall! I will post a picture if I get a bloom this summer! Smiling Thank You!
Name: Cindy
Hobart, IN zone 5
aka CindyMzone5
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
Shadegardener
Jul 25, 2017 12:23 PM CST
'Endless Summer (bummer)' has died back to the ground every year for the past several years. And it's in a protected spot. If it dies back to the ground, it doesn't bloom on new wood the following summer. I'm ready to yank that one out of the ground after 8+ years. I shouldn't have to over-fertilize to get it to bloom.
Only when the last tree has died and the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught will we realize that we can't eat money. Cree proverb
Name: Philip Becker
Fresno California (Zone 8a)
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Philipwonel
Jul 25, 2017 2:14 PM CST
Christy :
Sounds like a great plan. 😁😁😁 Thumbs up
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Anything i say, could be misrepresented, or wrong.
Name: Philip Becker
Fresno California (Zone 8a)
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Philipwonel
Jul 25, 2017 2:18 PM CST
@Shadegardener
Cindy : Have you ever given it extra protection over winter ?
Like freeze cloth or straw ?
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Anything i say, could be misrepresented, or wrong.
Name: Cindy
Hobart, IN zone 5
aka CindyMzone5
Celebrating Gardening: 2015 Plant Identifier
Shadegardener
Jul 25, 2017 4:22 PM CST
No extra protection. It's supposed to be hardy and isn't.
Only when the last tree has died and the last river has been poisoned and the last fish has been caught will we realize that we can't eat money. Cree proverb
Name: Philip Becker
Fresno California (Zone 8a)
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Philipwonel
Jul 25, 2017 4:42 PM CST
Cindy : I think you just answered your own question !
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Anything i say, could be misrepresented, or wrong.
Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
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sooby
Jul 25, 2017 5:07 PM CST
It's promoted as being hardy to zone 4. So one wouldn't expect to need to protect a plant that is hardy to zone 4 in that zone or milder. Yet the Endless Summer website says to protect it from "freezing winter temperatures". Freezing winter temperatures occur in much milder zones than 4, so in what zone does it not need winter protection one might wonder.

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