Plant ID forum: ???? What is this

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NY
Laurasloan
Jul 26, 2017 2:04 PM CST
Hi! This is growing in our garden . What is it! Millbrook New York
Thumb of 2017-07-26/Laurasloan/ed58f3
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Thumb of 2017-07-26/Laurasloan/4410b2

Thank you ! Laura sloan
Name: Rj
Just S of the twin cities of M (Zone 4b)
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crawgarden
Jul 26, 2017 2:08 PM CST
Dodder
Dodder (Cuscuta)
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[Last edited by crawgarden - Jul 26, 2017 2:09 PM (+)]
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NY
Laurasloan
Jul 26, 2017 2:13 PM CST
Thank you!!! That was very helpful and quick!!! Thank you again!!!
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
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DaisyI
Jul 26, 2017 2:32 PM CST
Wow, I thought Cuscuta was a west coast thing. The seeds germinate in the ground but have to root in a plant to survive. If this one is already rooted in the plant stems, there's not much you can do to save the plant. To save your yard, dispose of any plants the Cuscuta is rooted into and watch for little orange worms emerging from the soil.
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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sooby
Jul 26, 2017 2:34 PM CST
It's parasitic so you'll probably want to remove it. There's rather a lot there, I was able to get rid of a small infestation by pulling it several years ago - there are some recommendations from the Missouri Botanical Garden here

http://www.missouribotanicalga...
NY
Laurasloan
Jul 26, 2017 3:39 PM CST
That is very helpful !! Thank you!!!
Name: Rj
Just S of the twin cities of M (Zone 4b)
Garden Ideas: Level 1 Plant Identifier Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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crawgarden
Jul 27, 2017 3:41 PM CST
Plant parasite dodder transmits signals among different hosts
CHINESE ACADEMY OF SCIENCES HEADQUARTERS


CREDIT: ZHANG JINGXIONG

Around 1% of flowering plants are parasites. Some of these parasites can survive without host plants while others cannot. The former are called facultative parasites and the latter obligate parasites.

Based on their photosynthetic capability, parasites can be classified as either hemiparasites (those that perform photosynthesis) or holoparasites (those that do not).

Compared with normal autotrophic plants, plant parasites have unique physiological and ecological characteristics, as well as unique evolutionary histories. Many holoparasites exhibit special morphologies. For example, the root parasites Orobanche spp. (broomrapes) have no leaves and lack chlorophyll.

Although the morphology of parasitic plants varies, they all use a special organ, the haustorium, to attach to hosts, penetrate host tissues, and extract water and nutrients. Cuscuta spp. (dodder) is a plant parasite that connects to the vasculature of host plants to extract water, nutrients, and even macromolecules.

It is the only parasitic plant in the family Convolvulaceae, and is closely related to the morning glory and sweet potato. Dodders are leafless and rootless throughout their lifecycle, totally depending on host plants to survive. Whether hosts and dodders have any exchange of signaling molecules was previously unknown.

Like other parasites, it is generally believed that dodders are harmful to hosts. A research team led by Prof. WU Jianqiang, a scientist at the Kunming Institute of Botany of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (KIB/CAS) and the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Germany, discovered that when a host plant is attacked by insects, dodders can transmit signals to other dodder-connected hosts, which then activate defense responses.

As a result of the induced defense responses in these dodder-connected host plants, insects grew smaller than on hosts whose dodder-connected neighboring plants were not attacked by insects.

Importantly, the researchers also revealed that mobile signals transmitted by dodders are ancient and well conserved. Jasmonic acid (a plant hormone) plays an important role in generating these signals; such signals are produced very rapidly and can travel through a dodder network at least one meter long.

This is the first time that dodders have been found to transmit inter-plant signaling. This discovery shows that, in addition to damaging hosts, dodders also transmit ecologically meaningful information among host plants.

This research has been published in PNAS online in an article entitled "Stem parasitic plant Cuscuta australis (dodder) transfers herbivory-induced signals among plants".

###

This work was primarily supported by the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the Max Planck Partner Group Program, and the National Natural Science Foundation of China.
Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed.
Name: Daisy I
Reno, Nv (Zone 6b)
Not all who wander are lost
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DaisyI
Jul 27, 2017 5:49 PM CST
Interesting.... Thank You! Crawgarden!
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and proclaiming...."WOW What a Ride!!" -Mark Frost

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