Ask a Question forum: What is this?

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San Diego
Cristiangee
Aug 2, 2017 4:08 PM CST
I found these blue worm/Rollie polli looking things in my soil, can someone please tell me what these are and if they're bad or good to your garden before I even use the soil
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Name: Lin
Florida Zone 9b, 10a

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plantladylin
Aug 2, 2017 4:48 PM CST
They look like some sort of Grub Worms, which are the larvae of beetles; they eat the roots of plants. I found this article giving tips on eradicating them: http://www.veggiegardener.com/...
~ Playing in the dirt is my therapy ... and I'm in therapy a lot! ~


Name: Yardenman
Maryland (Zone 7a)
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Yardenman
Aug 3, 2017 1:56 AM CST
Cristiangee said:I found these blue worm/Rollie polli looking things in my soil, can someone please tell me what these are and if they're bad or good to your garden before I even use the soil
Thumb of 2017-08-02/Cristiangee/e75f35
Thumb of 2017-08-02/Cristiangee/e4224f



If they are widespread in the lawn and garden, a spray of beneficial nematodes or an application of milky spore powder will help a lot. Both seek grubs to feed on and will spread throughout the soil for years as long as there are grubs. Neither are harmful to beneficial insects like worms or bees or ladybugs.

Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
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sooby
Aug 3, 2017 2:23 AM CST
Yardenman said:

If they are widespread in the lawn and garden, a spray of beneficial nematodes or an application of milky spore powder will help a lot. Both seek grubs to feed on and will spread throughout the soil for years as long as there are grubs. Neither are harmful to beneficial insects like worms or bees or ladybugs.



Milky spore only works if they are Japanese beetle grubs (and in at least some areas is not as effective as it was once thought to be). There are several similar related grubs that are not Japanese beetles so these would need to be identified to determine if milky spore is an option.

Name: Philip
Anaheim, CA (Disneyland) (Zone 9b)
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pphanfx
Aug 3, 2017 2:33 AM CST
Hmm.. good chance those are larvae of "May Beetles," June Beetles", or possibly those Green Rose Chafers. They'd be consuming decaying matter and some roots around the surface at night.. The adults are annoying, but beneficial pollinators.

Possible Suspects (Southern California):
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See a bunch of these flying around? Bzzz *bump*... bzzz *bump* *thud*

Water your plants!
[Last edited by pphanfx - Aug 3, 2017 2:36 AM (+)]
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Name: Yardenman
Maryland (Zone 7a)
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Yardenman
Aug 3, 2017 2:39 AM CST
sooby said:

Milky spore only works if they are Japanese beetle grubs (and in at least some areas is not as effective as it was once thought to be). There are several similar related grubs that are not Japanese beetles so these would need to be identified to determine if milky spore is an option.



You are quite correct about milky spore attacking only "japanese" beetle larvae, though I thought all scarab beetle grubs are included in that category.

Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
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sooby
Aug 3, 2017 10:58 AM CST
Yardenman said:

You are quite correct about milky spore attacking only "japanese" beetle larvae, though I thought all scarab beetle grubs are included in that category.



Only one species of Scarab, which is the Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica), is susceptible to milky spore but not the other Scarabs like June Beetle, Chafers etc. I was at a talk by an entomologist a couple of years ago who said that even for Japanese beetle milky spore is no longer as effective as it was once thought to be (at least in some areas), and that the nematodes are likely a better choice if avoiding "chemicals". The way to identify the grubs is to look at the spine pattern on their rear ends (raster). Figure 2 on this page gives the pattern for several of them but the grubs tend to take a rather dim view of having their bottoms inspected Hilarious!

https://extension.entm.purdue....

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