Texas Gardening forum: Fall veggie and herb gardens in N Central Tx

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North Central TX (Zone 8a)
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tx_flower_child
Aug 2, 2017 8:13 PM CST
Has anyone started a fall vegetable and/or herb garden from seeds? Especially in the DFW area? I know the window has passed for some crops unless they're transplants, but as I'm fixing to order seeds from Victory Seeds (yay!), I'm open for suggestions. And might be open to sharing.
Name: Kristi
east Texas pineywoods (Zone 8a)
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pod
Aug 2, 2017 9:24 PM CST
Cool weather herbs that I start in fall/winter are Chervil and Cilantro. I tried Caraway this summer and it has struggled so I think it will be a cool weather herb also.

I haven't done much for vegies through winter as it is a busy time at work but I do grow lettuce and radishes. Some greens will also do well. I am sure there are other cool weather crops but no experience for me.

Tell us, what seeds were you thinking of ordering?
Be content moving inch by inch because, by days end, the inches, will add up to feet and yards.

Fulfilling ambitious objectives is usually done one step at a time.
North Central TX (Zone 8a)
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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tx_flower_child
Aug 2, 2017 10:09 PM CST
Thanks @pod. Cilantro is definitely on my herb list. Other herbs would be Basil, Dill and Parsley. I know that there are several types of each but I haven't gotten that far.

Not sure if Arugula is a veg or an herb. Victory Seeds has it under herbs.

And now, in no particular order, are some of the vegetables that I'd like to get for the Dallas Public Seed Library. (I'm donating all almost all of the seeds there.) Some of them I grew when I lived in Austin but only grew them from transplants, not seeds. Thus I don't know if it's too late for starting seeds.

Lettuce
Spinach
Kale
Collards
Mustard
Swiss Chard
and maybe some Carrots, Beans, Peas, and Turnips.

One thing that the Seed Librarian told me the other day was that most of the people who have been 'checking out' seeds are beginning gardeners. He also said that the Seed Library is pretty wiped out. (Feel free to donate.) BTW - in case anyone is unfamiliar with the Dallas Seed Library, the main thing to know is that you don't have to live in Dallas to use it. But you'd have to drive to the main branch of the Dallas Public Library in downtown Dallas. (No small feat.)

I can also get seeds for wildflowers (think Bluebonnets) and various other flowers, including tropical milkweed. I barely got that far last night when I was reading thru the Victory Seeds online catalog. It was making me hungry and I had to quit.

Actually, I know that beans would be a stretch, but there are some on the 'endangered' list that I thought it would be nice to support. And if need be, some seeds can be ordered when it's time for spring planting.

And . . . since many of the seed packets have 350 or more seeds, I might be persuaded to share some with friendly Texas gardeners.

Thanks again for any advice.
Name: Kristi
east Texas pineywoods (Zone 8a)
Winter Sowing Cat Lover Dog Lover Vermiculture Birds Bulbs
Canning and food preservation Butterflies Composter Bromeliad Bookworm Greenhouse
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pod
Aug 3, 2017 9:02 PM CST
Cilantro and Parsley will do for planting in winter..
Basil and Dill are summer herbs.
I wouldn't call Arugula an herb ~ but then what do I know... Green Grin!

I would have to check my seed stash but know I have cilantro and should have some chervil and dill seed to share. I also have been harvesting a lot of Papalo seed this summer if it interests you.

I need to get some fall crops started here as well. My inspiration plays out as the days grow shorter and things get busier at work.

I barely got that far last night when I was reading thru the Victory Seeds online catalog. It was making me hungry and I had to quit.
That made me laugh. That explains why I overspend when I shop the seed catalogues. Rolling on the floor laughing
Be content moving inch by inch because, by days end, the inches, will add up to feet and yards.

Fulfilling ambitious objectives is usually done one step at a time.
North Central TX (Zone 8a)
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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tx_flower_child
Aug 3, 2017 9:36 PM CST
@pod — I never thought of Arugula as an herb, either. Guess we both know about the same.

I wasn't sure if there was enough time to get in a quick batch of Basil but probably not. I'll check but I think Dill can survive awhile depending on our undependable weather. As I recall, Victory Seeds has 3 different types of Dill. I hate making decisions when they don't matter very much.

I had never heard of Papalo so I googled it just now. Wow! Love the description. "It has been described by some as somewhere between arugula, cilantro and rue; others say it tastes like a mixture of nasturtium flowers, lime, and cilantro." I got that from the 1st site that popped up.
http://www.underwoodgardens.co...

So yes, would love any seeds you have to share. I can send you a tree-mail with my address for whenever. And you can think of what seeds you'd like in return.

Since I've one 2 certificates now from Victory Seeds, I can always hold back a little for spring planting. They've got a lot of regular, heirloom and 'endangered' tomato seeds. And who knows? Maybe I'll be lucky and win another NARR. Stranger things have happened.
Name: Kristi
east Texas pineywoods (Zone 8a)
Winter Sowing Cat Lover Dog Lover Vermiculture Birds Bulbs
Canning and food preservation Butterflies Composter Bromeliad Bookworm Greenhouse
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pod
Aug 4, 2017 6:12 AM CST
Yes, it may take me a bit but I will see what I can put together to send you and if you don't want or need what I send, share at will.

The Papalo is an odd seed to germinate. I think it produces loads of seed due to low germination but the plant is sturdy in the summer heat. As much as I like Cilantro, the verdict is still out on Papalo. It is an unusual taste/scent.

I love Underwood Gardens. I have bought from them in the past. Their site has great information and they have some unusual plants. I always look for plants better suited to our summer heat. Sometimes I win and sometimes the summer temps win.

And if anyone else reading this thread wants to try some of these herb seeds, I will share. Just let me know...

A smaller lettuce that I love for winter growing is Little Gem. It is a small romaine although I don't care if it forms heads. I trim it like a loose leaf and love the taste. Lovey dubby
Be content moving inch by inch because, by days end, the inches, will add up to feet and yards.

Fulfilling ambitious objectives is usually done one step at a time.
North Central TX (Zone 8a)
Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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tx_flower_child
Aug 4, 2017 12:04 PM CST
Thanks, pod.

Looking at the lettuces on Victory Seeds, I saw some that sound wonderful, several of which I can't pronounce. Plan to order all 3. Each cost $1.95 per packet and a packet contains one gram, which is approximately 500 to 600 seeds. Would be happy to share a few seeds. Sounds like they'd be especially good for our many Texas micro climates. If anyone has conflicting information, speak (or type) now.

Italienischer
(Leaf-type Lettuce)

55 days — The vigorous growing plants reach up to 18 inches in height, upright, and sturdy.  The vibrant green leaves are interestingly shaped, almost like dandelion leaves.  The flavor is sweet, crisp, and remains so long after other varieties have grown bitter with maturity.  
It can be sown in spring or fall in most areas and is a "cut and come again" type.

and

Sweet Valentine
(Romaine-type Lettuce)

55 days — A fast-growing romaine type that is slow to bolt even in hot conditions. The deep red leaves form a nice romaine head at maturity. The flavor is exceptionally sweet and mild. 
It can be sown in spring or fall in most areas.

and one more:

Merveille de Quatre Saisons
(Bibb-type)

40 days — "Marvel of Four Seasons," as the name suggests, is a marvelous lettuce variety that can be grown nearly year-round. This French heirloom was first introduced to Americans on the PBS series, "The Victory Garden."
Ruby red-tipped leaves that surround tight folded green hearts. Does great through the summer heat and can withstand down to 20ºF in a sealed greenhouse or in cloches.

I did say that the catalog was making me hungry, right?

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