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Name: Rj
Just S of the twin cities of M (Zone 4b)
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crawgarden
Aug 8, 2017 8:31 AM CST

Dinosaur-era plant found growing in Wisconsin lakes

By Brooks Hays
July 31, 2017 at 5:05 PM
Follow @upi

The newly discovered algae species, Lychnothamnus barbatus, has a distinct structure and is significantly taller than most freshwater algae. Photo by Paul Skawinski/University of Wisconsin Extension
July 31 (UPI) -- Scientists have found a surprise algae species growing in Wisconsin lakes, a species most thought was existent from the Americas.

Lychnothamnus barbatus is a tall algae species. It has previously been found in Europe and Australasia. Cretaceous-era fossils unearthed in Australia offer the only evidence of the species in the Americas.

Having disappeared from the scientific record, most assumed it had died out with the dinosaurs. But now, researchers have found the unique algae species living in the Midwest.


"This means mainly that we don't know as much about what's out there as we could," Richard McCourt, a professor of botany at Drexel University, said in a news release. "Lychnothamnus barbatus' survival isn't, per se, ecologically earth-shaking, but it changes our view of what the algal flora of North America is composed of and inspires us to keep hunting for more new finds."

Researchers collected the algae from 14 lakes across Wisconsin. After combing the scientific record for a match, researchers confirmed the species identify using DNA analysis.

It's possible the species is invasive, having snuck across the globe in the ballast of a cargo ship.

"Other species like it have probably been brought in in ballast water on ships and released into the St. Lawrence seaway or other lakes," McCourt said.

But it's not inconceivable that the algae species has been hiding out undetected for centuries.

"If it went unnoticed, it is probably due to the fact that much of what is in lakes and streams is not thoroughly examined, despite centuries of collecting," McCourt said. "We need more feet on the ground, hands in the water, collecting."

Researchers described the discovery of the surprise species this week in the American Journal of Botany.

https://www.upi.com/Science_Ne...
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Name: Yardenman
Maryland (Zone 7a)
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Yardenman
Aug 9, 2017 4:16 AM CST
crawgarden said:
Dinosaur-era plant found growing in Wisconsin lakes

By Brooks Hays
July 31, 2017 at 5:05 PM
Follow @upi

The newly discovered algae species, Lychnothamnus barbatus, has a distinct structure and is significantly taller than most freshwater algae. Photo by Paul Skawinski/University of Wisconsin Extension
July 31 (UPI) -- Scientists have found a surprise algae species growing in Wisconsin lakes, a species most thought was existent from the Americas.

Lychnothamnus barbatus is a tall algae species. It has previously been found in Europe and Australasia. Cretaceous-era fossils unearthed in Australia offer the only evidence of the species in the Americas.

Having disappeared from the scientific record, most assumed it had died out with the dinosaurs. But now, researchers have found the unique algae species living in the Midwest.


"This means mainly that we don't know as much about what's out there as we could," Richard McCourt, a professor of botany at Drexel University, said in a news release. "Lychnothamnus barbatus' survival isn't, per se, ecologically earth-shaking, but it changes our view of what the algal flora of North America is composed of and inspires us to keep hunting for more new finds."

Researchers collected the algae from 14 lakes across Wisconsin. After combing the scientific record for a match, researchers confirmed the species identify using DNA analysis.

It's possible the species is invasive, having snuck across the globe in the ballast of a cargo ship.

"Other species like it have probably been brought in in ballast water on ships and released into the St. Lawrence seaway or other lakes," McCourt said.

But it's not inconceivable that the algae species has been hiding out undetected for centuries.

"If it went unnoticed, it is probably due to the fact that much of what is in lakes and streams is not thoroughly examined, despite centuries of collecting," McCourt said. "We need more feet on the ground, hands in the water, collecting."

Researchers described the discovery of the surprise species this week in the American Journal of Botany.

https://www.upi.com/Science_Ne...


Yeah, we all need a new species of algae...
Name: Sandi
Austin, Tx (Zone 8b)
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Bubbles
Aug 9, 2017 6:49 AM CST
I think that's fascinating!
springfield MO area (Zone 6a)
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Frillylily
Aug 9, 2017 6:58 AM CST
seems like it has survived just find w/o any hands or feet in the water. Less hands and feet, just let things be.

Name: Yardenman
Maryland (Zone 7a)
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Yardenman
Aug 9, 2017 3:55 PM CST
Frillylily said:seems like it has survived just find w/o any hands or feet in the water. Less hands and feet, just let things be.



Well, actually I do too. More species, better diversity. More foods. more food crops. And just plain nicer flowers too.

Name: Cheryl
Texas (Zone 9a)
Region: Texas Greenhouse Plant Identifier Plant Lover: Loves 'em all! Plumerias Ponds
Foliage Fan Enjoys or suffers hot summers Tropicals Garden Ideas: Master Level Garden Sages Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
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ShadyGreenThumb
Aug 11, 2017 10:30 AM CST
A friend sent me this article.

Scientists identify first flowering plant from 40 million years ago in 'major step forward' http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sci...
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