Ask a Question forum: Thwarting Deer

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Name: Yardenman
Maryland (Zone 7a)
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Yardenman
Aug 12, 2017 1:32 AM CST
I was looking at some stuff in my basement and noted the rolls of 2"x3"x36" vinyl mesh rolls. It occurred to me that deer might really not want to put their hooves through that 18" deep.

So I got to thinking about how to set up a mesh like that they wouldn't walk through to get at my hostas. The green vinyl mesh is nearly invisible to me, and my hostas are in a landscaping box.

Hmm... What if I laid down that vinyl mesh 6' out from the host bed and dared the deer to walk through it. Framed and hinged so I could lift it up when I needed to mow the lawn. And held 18" high" otherwise?

Do you think that might discourage them?
[Last edited by Yardenman - Aug 12, 2017 1:34 AM (+)]
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Name: Karen
NM (Zone 7b)
Region: New Mexico Critters Allowed Region: Arizona Xeriscape Greenhouse Annuals
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plantmanager
Aug 12, 2017 9:12 AM CST
It's worth a try! We have them all over our land. We are going to try putting up fence posts with 30 pound clear fishing line attached. Supposedly it spooks them when they come up against it and they turn and run. I think they'll be hesitant to jump over what they can't see well.
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Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
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sooby
Aug 12, 2017 10:36 AM CST
I've used the fishing line strung using electric fence posts with one strand at deer chest height. In one spot I have added another line about a foot lower to protect a young apple tree, but I'm not sure it is necessary. I actually watched a deer reach for a daylily bud over the fishing line and spooked when its chest or neck touched the line and backed away and the daylily bud survived. I think they don't like feeling the touch of something they can't see or else they have encountered electric fencing before and expect a zap. You just have to make sure it is set back a little from the plants so that they have to reach over. I've suggested this to other people and it worked for them too but I'm not sure it would do as well on a long established deer route. It's very inexpensive to try though, you can't really see it so it doesn't detract from the garden.
Name: Elaine
Sarasota, Fl
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dyzzypyxxy
Aug 12, 2017 11:33 AM CST
Not sure the mesh idea would work unless you covered all the ground between the deer and the hostas. They'll jump over it if they can see clear ground beyond it.
Elaine

"Success is stumbling from failure to failure with no loss of enthusiasm." –Winston Churchill
Name: Karen
NM (Zone 7b)
Region: New Mexico Critters Allowed Region: Arizona Xeriscape Greenhouse Annuals
Cactus and Succulents Bromeliad Adeniums Orchids Tropicals Plumerias
Image
plantmanager
Aug 12, 2017 11:35 AM CST
The deer have established routes around our property, but I'm thinking of fencing in a new area that hasn't had any plants up to now. I'll do raised beds. Since it's new, I'm hoping the fishing line alone will work. If not, we can do the electric fence too. I want to keep it as nice looking as I can. I hate to see everything in wire cages.
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Name: Yardenman
Maryland (Zone 7a)
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Yardenman
Aug 12, 2017 11:58 AM CST
I'm thinking the deer won't walk along the mesh, but also wont jump 6' across it if there might be and there will be.

I know white tail deer; I used to hunt them, bow and arrow. And one thing they hate is high tight spaces around their precious legs. My plan is to threaten those legs. I'll let you know if it works...

And, BTW, if a couple break their precious legs, that is fine with me. A few limping or flopping around will be a good lesson to the others. If I didn't care about household pets, I would set out rat traps for the big buggers.

I hate deer destroying my yard and I'm tired of them. Time they learned to fear us humans again! Glare

May they live safely and happily in the woods and wetlands...
Name: Yardenman
Maryland (Zone 7a)
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Yardenman
Aug 17, 2017 5:42 AM CST
I observed something new today. Usually, there are routine deer hoofprints on my mulch. But today there were scuffled marks and 3 piles of deer scat, none of which looking healthy (sorry, a soft pile, not the usual pellets).

Is this "rut" symptoms?

Name: Sue
Ontario, Canada (Zone 4a)
Daylilies Birds Enjoys or suffers cold winters Native Plants and Wildflowers Butterflies Annuals
Region: Canadian Keeps Horses Dog Lover Plant Identifier Garden Sages
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sooby
Aug 17, 2017 11:15 AM CST
It's too early for the rut, maybe it was something it/they ate?

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