Houseplants forum: Umbrella plant

Views: 526, Replies: 10 » Jump to the end
Los Angeles
Image
krystenr1
Aug 22, 2017 12:56 PM CST
When is it time to repot? I thought umbrella plants were supposed to grow pretty rapidly, but I haven't seen any growth over the last year.


Thumb of 2017-08-22/krystenr1/8b8754
Thumb of 2017-08-22/krystenr1/eeb64d
Thumb of 2017-08-22/krystenr1/8f377e
Thumb of 2017-08-22/krystenr1/d0dca5

Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
Always count your blessings in life
Cat Lover Houseplants Plays in the sandbox Region: California Orchids Plant Lover: Loves 'em all!
Composter Cactus and Succulents Dragonflies Hummingbirder Amaryllis Container Gardener
Image
tarev
Aug 22, 2017 1:35 PM CST
Hello krystenr1, your Schefflera looks quite okay to me! It maybe making its trunk fatter or just busy with root formation, so you don't see other type of growth for now.

There is a different type of dynamics involved with growing them indoors and outdoors. My Scheffleras grow outdoors year round, but in part sun conditions. At this time of the year, I spritz everything, the leaves, branches, stems and water them often. So far it is giving me new leaf growth if I do that.

Give your plant some more time to mature further. The stem looks so green, so to me it looks very young, it should eventually make it bark-like texture. I do not think your plant is due for a repot either. But if I do make a repot, I prefer to do it in Spring, not during summer when conditions are stressfully dry and hot.
Los Angeles
Image
krystenr1
Aug 22, 2017 1:38 PM CST
tarev said:Hello krystenr1, your Schefflera looks quite okay to me! It maybe making its trunk fatter or just busy with root formation, so you don't see other type of growth for now.

There is a different type of dynamics involved with growing them indoors and outdoors. My Scheffleras grow outdoors year round, but in part sun conditions. At this time of the year, I spritz everything, the leaves, branches, stems and water them often. So far it is giving me new leaf growth if I do that.

Give your plant some more time to mature further. The stem looks so green, so to me it looks very young, it should eventually make it bark-like texture. I do not think your plant is due for a repot either. But if I do make a repot, I prefer to do it in Spring, not during summer when conditions are stressfully dry and hot.


Awesome, thank you! I spritz it every day but only water it once a week. I assume this is okay behaviour given that it lives inside? What do you think? It sits in a south-facing window but it's sharing that window with a lot of friends, so it doesn't have entirely direct light.
Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
Always count your blessings in life
Cat Lover Houseplants Plays in the sandbox Region: California Orchids Plant Lover: Loves 'em all!
Composter Cactus and Succulents Dragonflies Hummingbirder Amaryllis Container Gardener
Image
tarev
Aug 22, 2017 1:53 PM CST
Yup, it sounds okay. I always try to observe the leaves. The leaves of your plant looks quite happy. It is quite drought tolerant, so your once a week watering is okay, as long as you do it thoroughly. I have to do more frequent watering on my plant since it stays outdoors.

This is mine:
Thumb of 2017-08-22/tarev/78cacb

And the well formed trunk, has bark texture already:
Thumb of 2017-08-22/tarev/1d38d4

I have this other one, a cutting obtained from that other plant a few years back, at first it was not doing good..very sparse leafing:

Oct2016
Thumb of 2017-08-22/tarev/f78efd

Then I spritz it more often, watered more often, finally better growth. I guess I can get away with it here since our humidity is dismally low:
Thumb of 2017-08-22/tarev/5e340d Thumb of 2017-08-22/tarev/799b4d

It is good your plant shares the spot with other plants, it helps create some humid environment.
[Last edited by tarev - Aug 22, 2017 1:54 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1533567 (4)
Los Angeles
Image
krystenr1
Aug 22, 2017 2:36 PM CST
Wow yours look amazing! I hope to have something of that size someday.
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
Image
WillC
Aug 22, 2017 3:32 PM CST
Krysten - Your Schefflera arboricola will stay in that pot for a long time as it is nowhere near being potbound. Indeed, the slow growth is at least in part because it is putting energy into filling the pot with roots at the expense of foliage growth. Top growth tends to be stronger when plants are moderately potbound. It is good light, not pot size, that is the primary determinant of plant growth.

Scheffleras do not require high humidity, so spraying the leaves serves no particular purpose. I see what appear to be water spots on the leaves. That happens when water droplets evaporate and leave mineral residue behind. If the white residue was there before you purchased the plant, then it may be pesticidal residue from the nursery.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
Always count your blessings in life
Cat Lover Houseplants Plays in the sandbox Region: California Orchids Plant Lover: Loves 'em all!
Composter Cactus and Succulents Dragonflies Hummingbirder Amaryllis Container Gardener
Image
tarev
Aug 22, 2017 6:29 PM CST
Actually in California, with our extremely super dry weather, that spritzing of leaves, branches and stem helps a lot. Unlike in other areas going midwest to east where there is more rain, pronounced humidity levels, it will not matter naturally. When humidity levels go down so much to 40% and lower it really takes a toll on any plant here. Lucky for those on the coastal side of California where the ocean brings forth marine layer fog for the plants.

More often the white residue on the leaves can be hard water leftovers. So a good wash down from time to time is quite good for the plant too.

I am quite thankful Scheffleras have a drought tolerant attribute, but there is a limit to the excessive dry conditions so spritzing helps it.
[Last edited by tarev - Aug 22, 2017 6:29 PM (+)]
Give a thumbs up | Quote | Post #1533711 (7)
Name: Will Creed
NYC
Professional indoor plant consultan
Image
WillC
Aug 22, 2017 6:58 PM CST
Tarev - It may surprise you that humidity levels in our overheated homes in the northeast in winter, the humidity levels are often drier that the desert. The plants I take care of are in office environments where I have no way to increase humidity. I learned long ago that many of the most commonly used indoor plants, including Scheffleras, do quite well as long as their roots are kept sufficiently moist. It also means, somewhat counterintuitively, that our plants use more water in winter than in summer.
Will Creed
Horticultural Help, NYC
www.HorticulturalHelp.com
Contact me directly at [email protected]
I now have a book available on indoor plant care
Name: tarev
San Joaquin County, CA (Zone 9b)
Always count your blessings in life
Cat Lover Houseplants Plays in the sandbox Region: California Orchids Plant Lover: Loves 'em all!
Composter Cactus and Succulents Dragonflies Hummingbirder Amaryllis Container Gardener
Image
tarev
Aug 22, 2017 9:20 PM CST
Actually I do understand indoor winter growing conditions for Scheffleras and other tropical plants so it is not at all surprising to me, since I have lived before in the North too, in Canada, where our winter conditions are much longer and colder.

Since krystenr1's question pertains to her Schefflera during this summer season in her current location, then that is my suggestion to spritz the plant more often. Summer growing time is active growing time for tropical plants provided temperatures are not extreme. As it is, our temperatures here exceed comfortable levels, and with the longer light situation, the plant is consuming more resources. It is good Krystenr1's plant is indoors so that helps the plant a lot in not suffering extreme dry conditions outdoors. But temperature is just one of the aspects to be monitored, humidity levels in summer is important too. Sadly most of Cali do not get rain, so humidity here is often dismal, indoors and outdoors.

Compared to indoor winter growing time, watering conditions needs to be adjusted as the plants will slow down naturally with the shorter light levels and even if heaters are running it goes in a cycle so there is frequent temperature fluctuation. So I still water my plants during winter but with greater intervals, since they are not growing in their optimum desirable conditions, and I would not recommend spritzing in winter since it will just invite fungal issues. It is a different matter if one has a greenhouse and money to spend to keep the ideal temperature needed sustained. My indoor plants are usually grouped together in winter too, so they can benefit from whatever shared humidity they can get. And even if indoor humidity is lower during winter, it is better than freezing temperatures, so the plants can still ably cope and survive.


Los Angeles
Image
krystenr1
Aug 22, 2017 11:04 PM CST
This is great info, thank you!
Name: Tiffany purpleinopp
Opp, AL 🌵🌷⚘🌹🌻 (Zone 8b)
Houseplants Organic Gardener Composter Region: Gulf Coast Miniature Gardening Native Plants and Wildflowers
Tropicals Butterflies Garden Sages Cactus and Succulents Plant Identifier Million Pollinator Garden Challenge
Image
purpleinopp
Aug 23, 2017 4:59 PM CST
Yours looks like the smaller of the 2 in popular commerce, S. arboricola, a much smaller plant in general, and a slower-grower than S. actinophylla. Many anecdotes conflate the 2 species.
👀😁😂 - SMILE! -☺😎☻☮👌✌∞☯🐣🐦🐔🐝🍯🐾
The less I interfere, the more balance mother nature provides.
👒🎄👣🏡🍃🍂🌾🌿🍁❦❧ 🍃🍁🍂🌾🌻🌸🌼🌹🌽❀☀🌺
☕👓 The only way to succeed is to try.

« Garden.org Homepage
« Back to the top
« Forums List
« Houseplants forum
You must first create a username and login before you can reply to this thread.

Member Login:

Username:

Password:

[ Join now ]

Today's site banner is by dirtdorphins and is called "Agastache"